Todd Bookman | New Hampshire Public Radio

Todd Bookman

Senior Reporter

Todd started at NHPR in 2009 as an intern, and in 2011, took over the health beat. He spent two years at WHYY in Philadelphia covering health and science, before returning to NHPR in 2016 as a general assignment reporter with a focus on business and economics. He holds a master’s degree in public administration from Columbia University.

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Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu talked up the economy, touted improvements to New Hampshire's mental health system, and promoted new protections for drinking water during his annual "State of the State" address.

Speaking inside Representatives Hall to a joint session of New Hampshire lawmakers on Thursday, Sununu asked Republicans and Democrats to come together, and avoid Washington-style gridlock.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

A woman who gained international notoriety after police seized 75 purebred Great Danes from her home in 2017 is accusing a non-profit of improperly trying to profit from her case.

Christina Fay’s arrest made global headlines due to the size and scale of the allegations, coupled with dramatic images of giant dogs living inside a filthy mansion set on 53 acres. She was ultimately found guilty of 17 counts of animal cruelty by a jury in Superior Court.

Allegra Boverman | NHPR

It wasn’t just the election results in New Hampshire that were under the spotlight on Tuesday - it was also the process itself. That’s in large part because of what happened a little more than a week ago in Iowa, where that state’s Democratic caucus collapsed in spectacular fashion.

By all accounts, New Hampshire’s 6,000 local and state election officials - many of them elected by their own communities - helped pull off a relatively smooth Primary Day.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

When it comes to abortion rights support, there is little daylight between the Democrats running for president. That much became clear quickly at the ‘Our Rights, Our Courts’ forum in Concord Saturday sponsored by several abortion-rights groups including the Center for Reproductive Rights.

Jesse Costa/WBUR

There are those that consider this the most consequential election in our nation’s history. On the line, nothing less than the county’s collective destiny. In other words, politics are deadly serious in 2020.

And yet, the candidates are out there telling jokes!

FILE

The New Hampshire Senate has again passed a bill that would let qualified patients grow their own medical cannabis. The bill allows patients or designated caregivers to raise up to three mature marijuana plants at a time.

Tom Sherman, a Democrat from Rye, says approved patients can struggle to obtain cannabis.

You can’t outscroll them.

Political ads are bombarding social media in New Hampshire right now, as presidential candidates try to squeeze in as much digital facetime as they can in the lead up to Tuesday’s primary.

  

Courtesy of S.E.A.

A federal judge says a sexual harassment lawsuit filed against the president of one of the state’s largest unions can proceed.

The suit, brought by Maddisun Barrows, a former State Employees Association employee, accuses Richard Gulla of sexual harassment and gender discrimination, and alleges the SEA failed to stop his behavior. 

Gulla denies the accusations.

Photos via Wikimedia Commons

Tonight, Iowans will take to school gymnasiums and church basements to select their preferred presidential candidates. 

Tomorrow, voters in the other state that likes to call itself “first” will wake up, read the Iowa results, and then possibly go in their own direction.

Urchin New Media/Wikimedia Commons

A New Hampshire bill that would have prohibited housing discrimination against people who have pets is being scaled back at the lead sponsor’s request.

The legislation, in its original form, would have prevented landlords from imposing no pet policies on rental units statewide. 

Rep. Ellen Read, a Democrat from Newmarket, says concerns over animals damaging rental properties are exaggerated, and that pet owners can struggle to find housing options. 

Courtesy Kelly Trinkle

The seasonal attraction called Ice Castles allows visitors to explore a landscape straight out of the movie Frozen. Open for just a few months on a former farm in the White Mountain town of North Woodstock, N.H., the massive ice installations draw adults and kids alike to a world of sub-zero architecture.

But last spring, as the temperatures rose, a neighbor’s basement looked more like the set of Waterworld, prompting a lawsuit against Ice Castles for allegedly failing to control the runoff from its property.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Steve Duprey, who has served four terms representating New Hampshire on the Republican National Committee, lost his bid for re-election Saturday. Chris Ager, chairman of the Hillsborough County GOP, will take Duprey's spot after winning election at the annual meeting of the New Hampshire Republican Party.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

State Senators began work today on a bill that would clear the way for importing prescription drugs from Canada, following in the wake of several states, including Vermont, which have approved similar measures. 

The lead sponsor of SB 685, Sen. Dan Feltes, a Democrat from Concord, said the program would help residents who struggle with the growing cost of prescription medicines.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Lawmakers are considering a bill that would tighten the rules for how candidates in New Hampshire spend their campaign funds.

An investigation by NHPR last year found that lawmakers in New Hampshire routinely use campaign money on items including flower arrangements, dry cleaning and auto mechanic bills, raising questions about the appropriateness of such expenses.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

A former state employee fired for what she alleges was hostility over a request for breastfeeding accommodation argued her case before the Supreme Court of New Hampshire on Tuesday. 

The case has been winding its way through both federal and state courts for more than six years. Kate Frederick, who now resides in Vermont, alleges she was fired from her position at the Department of Health and Human Services in September 2012.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Democrats on the state’s Fiscal Committee rejected a portion of a Department of Justice funding request, saying they didn’t want additional state money going toward lawsuits defending bills they opposed.

The Attorney General requested an additional $1.2 million in funding pay for ongoing litigation, including prosecuting criminal cases and defending two controversial election-related bills passed in previous sessions by Republicans. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

There appears to be little progress being made in a six-month long partisan stalemate over filling a vacancy on the New Hampshire Supreme Court.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

How would an extra $12,000 a year change your lifestyle? Your life? The centerpiece of Andrew Yang’s presidential campaign is something he dubs the Freedom Dividend: a payment of $1,000, every month, to every adult in America. 

George Goslin/Public Domain

Affordable housing isn't an issue getting a lot of attention in presidential campaign advertisements, on cable news or on the debate stage. But it is a topic with relevance to New Hampshire, a state with an incredibly tight rental market and a shortage of affordable housing options.

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

Presidential candidate Andrew Yang told an audience of teenagers in Concord today that he wants to lower the voting age in America to 16. He argues it would help promote civic engagement among younger people.

Speaking inside a nearly full auditorium at Concord High School, the former tech entrepreneur said that while some teenagers may not seem well-informed, there are plenty of voting-age adults who also fall into that category.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

With an $82 bet on the New England Patriots to win the Super Bowl, Chris Sununu, the state’s 82nd governor, helped launch sports wagering in New Hampshire on a snowy Monday afternoon.

Pixabay

Some Democrats in the statehouse want to make it easier to sue local gun ranges for noise violations. 

The proposed bill would repeal a 2004 law that grants gun ranges broad immunity from lawsuits, as long as they follow local noise ordinances that were already in place when the range opened. 

NHPR Photo

A group of lawmakers want to create a uniform statewide policy for how local law enforcement officers respond to misconduct within the force, including mandating public disclosure of any allegations. 

Under a bill coming up for debate next session, police officers in New Hampshire would be required to notify their chief when they see a fellow officer violate policy, from tampering with evidence to assaulting a suspect.

Flickr/Bhaskar Dutta

A bill coming before the legislature next year would require news organizations in New Hampshire to update or retract stories on the internet about a criminal proceeding if the defendant is ultimately found not guilty. 

The proposed legislation is sponsored by Rep. Jack Flanagan, a Republican from Brookline, who says two constituents contacted him requesting the measure.

courtesy

A bipartisan group of lawmakers wants to ban the retail sale of dogs, cats and rabbits at New Hampshire pet shops. The move, they say, would help stamp out less reputable breeders known as ‘puppy mills’ where animals are potentially subjected to inhumane conditions.

Pet shop owners, however, say the bill is unnecessary, and that the animals they sell are from regulated breeders.

A tax provision designed to boost local economies across the country has been getting a lot of attention in New Hampshire recently - not for its economic impact, but over allegations of political meddling. 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

A logger in Bradford is being ordered to pay a $10,000 fine for repeated violations of the state’s forestry laws.

The so-called enhanced penalty is the first of its kind in New Hampshire.

Under a bill passed in 2011, the Forest Protection Bureau and Attorney General can seek additional financial penalties against individuals with multiple forestry-related convictions during a seven-year period of time.

A recent health inspection at the men’s prison in Concord found 12 separate violations in the kitchen, including damaged equipment, a crumbling ceiling and rodent droppings. 

After receiving a complaint, health inspectors visited the prison the day before Thanksgiving last month. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

In a unanimous decision, the Supreme Court of New Hampshire has ruled that judges in trial courts can set cash bail for defendants at an unattainably high amount, as long as the court deems that the defendant is a flight risk.

In an opinion released Friday, the court agreed with the Attorney General’s office that setting high cash bail in those cases is justified, even if the defendant isn’t also deemed a danger to the public.

Alexius Horatius/Creative Commons

The Episcopal Church of New Hampshire is launching a new training program that it hopes will make  becoming a priest easier for people in different stages of their lives.

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