Todd Bookman | New Hampshire Public Radio

Todd Bookman

Senior Reporter

Todd started at NHPR in 2009 as an intern, and in 2011, took over the health beat. He spent two years at WHYY in Philadelphia covering health and science, before returning to NHPR in 2016 as a general assignment reporter with a focus on business and economics. He holds a master’s degree in public administration from Columbia University.

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Todd Bookman/NHPR

After more than two months of roped off parking and patrolled sand, New Hampshire’s beaches reopened on Monday.

Huge swaths of the shoreline remained empty, though, likely due to a combination of chilly morning weather and the large number of restrictions that remain in place, including limited parking capacity, in an effort to limit the spread of the coronavirus.

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Dan Tuohy / NHPR

The New Hampshire Supreme Court issued two opinions Friday that will require government agencies to share more information with the public.

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

While most of the state's businesses appear to be adhering to emergency orders issued by Gov. Chris Sununu designed to limit the spread of the coronavirus, more entities are openly violating the guidelines as the pandemic drags into warmer weather.

Related: What's open and what's not open in New Hampshire?

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With parades and public ceremonies cancelled because of the coronavirus, communities across New Hampshire are marking Memorial Day in novel ways.

Across Dover, Rochester and Somersworth, church bells tolled at 10am to mark the day of remembrance.

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Todd Bookman/NHPR

For the faithful, live streaming Sunday Mass is akin to watching fireworks on television: you can see it, and hear it, but you don’t feel it.

“It’s not the same,” said Mary Sanphy of Concord, who has spent the past few months praying alongside a screen. 

On Sunday, though, Sanphy and other Catholics in New Hampshire were able to receive Holy Communion in person for the first time in more than two months.

As long as social distancing is observed and other guidelines followed, the Diocese of Manchester is allowing parishes to offer the Eucharist.

File Photo, NHPR

A recent graduate of Southern New Hampshire University is suing the school, seeking a partial refund on her tuition after in-person classes were cancelled in mid-March due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Dan Tuohy | NHPR

New Hampshire's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate ballooned to 16.3 percent in April, the highest level since local reporting on unemployment began in 1976, and a clear indicator of the coronavirus’s staggering impact on the state economy.

Sea / Sean Hurley/NHPR

After two months of being limited to curbside pickup and delivery only, restaurants and cafes across New Hampshire are again serving customers outdoors.

Monday marked the next phase in the gradual reopening of the state’s food service industry, which has been devastated by the coronavirus pandemic and resulting restrictions.

Jon Greenberg, NHPR

Planet Fitness is facing a potential class action lawsuit filed by a member who alleges the New Hampshire-based gym chain charged membership fees despite the facilities closing their doors due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Pete Nakos/NHPR

On May 4, members of Anytime Fitness, a West Lebanon gym, received an unexpected email.

“We are so excited to share with you that our doors are now OPEN,” it read. 

Chris Spielmann/Wikimedia Commons

Manchester is easing the process for restaurants to set up outdoor seating, including using sidewalk space in front of adjacent properties.

In response to the coronavirus pandemic, restaurants in the state will be allowed to serve customers outdoors beginning May 18, though tables will need to be spaced at least six feet apart.

Sign up for NHPR's coronavirus newsletter to get the latest updates.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

New Hampshire’s economy took another step towards reopening on Monday, as retail businesses and hair salons welcomed customers back inside their stores.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

New Hampshire retail stores, hair salons, and barbershops will be permitted to allow customers back inside on Monday for the first time since Gov. Chris Sununu instituted limits to curtail the spread of coronavirus nearly two months ago.

Sean Hurley/NHPR

Like a lot of restaurants, Mad River Tavern in Campton shut down in mid-March due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Most employees were laid off, and whatever ingredients could be saved landed in the freezer. 

With the doors closed, tavern owner TJ O’Neil rolled up his sleeves.

With the help of a skeleton crew, he refurbished the bar, painted walls, and did trim work. 

Allison Quantz | NHPR

Hospitals in New Hampshire reopened their doors for a limited range of elective and other time-sensitive procedures on Monday, allowing patients to access care delayed by the global pandemic. 

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Josh Rogers / NHPR

Escrito en inglés por el personal de NHPR, reportado por Todd Bookman  

Traducido al español por María Aguirre y Daniela Allee 

El gobernador Chris Sununu anunció que la orden de quedarse en casa seguirá vigente hasta el 31 de mayo. La orden previa debía expirar el 4 de Mayo. 

Josh Rogers / NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu rolled out a limited reopening plan for some areas of New Hampshire’s economy Friday, citing what he called a “downward trend” in the overall rate of coronavirus cases and the readiness of the state’s hospitals to handle any surge in infections.

Tony Webster, Wikimedia Commons

Local banks say technical glitches are delaying the submission of applications for the second round of an emergency funding program for small businesses and nonprofits.

On Monday, the second phase of the Paycheck Protection Program, or PPP, got off to a rocky start. Local banks reported technical glitches as they attempted to submit loan applications for approval through the Small Business Administration.

bytemarks / Flickr Creative Commons

Here’s how Sarah Piedmont, 27, would describe the state’s online system for filing for unemployment benefits.

“It looks like they mashed together, like, five different websites from 2001,” she said.

Piedmont, who works as a restaurant server and is finishing up a degree in mathemathics at Southern New Hampshire University, is temporarily unemployed right now. 

Dan Tuohy | NHPR

A task force created to safely re-open the state’s economy met for the first time on Thursday.

The group consists of lawmakers, as well as leaders from a variety of industries including restaurants, retail and hospitals.

D.J. Bettencourt, policy director for Gov. Chris Sununu, said the committee’s mandate is “to ensure that New Hampshire’s economy is able to reopen efficiently, and in a manner that protects public health, while limiting the risks of any resurgence.”

LRGHealthcare Facebook Page

In the middle of March, LRGHealthcare — already drowning in debt — added more stones to its pockets. To prepare for a possible surge in coronavirus patients, the parent company of Lakes Region General Hospital in Laconia and Franklin Regional Hospital was forced to cancel all of its elective procedures.

David Lane/Union Leader (Pool Photo)

The man accused of opening fire at a wedding last October in Pelham, New Hampshire will remain in jail pending trial.

Dale Holloway appeared in court Tuesday via videoconference from Hillsborough County House of Corrections, where he is being held on attempted murder charges, as well as for the alleged assault of his first court appointed attorney.

[You can read NHPR's previous coverage of this story here.]

raymondclarkeimages/Flickr

While large sectors of the economy are shuttered at the moment, there are still plenty of products to ship, and goods to deliver to peoples’ homes.

Truckers, a loud but often invisible piece of the market, are in the middle of those transactions, logging thousands of miles back and forth across New England.

David Lane / Union Leader (Pool photo)

The man accused of opening fire during a wedding ceremony inside a Pelham church last year will argue that he should be released pending trial due to concerns over the coronavirus.

Dale Holloway, who will appear in court for a bail hearing Tuesday, is facing attempted murder charges for shooting Bishop Stanley Choate as well as the bride, Claire McCulllen, during a wedding last October inside the New England Pentecostal Ministries.

The groom, Mark Castiglione, was struck in the head with a firearm during the altercation. 

Courtesy

Most of us have never experienced anything quite like this moment. But Sharon Eng and her husband, who today own a manufacturing company in Belmont, happened to find themselves in the middle of another disease outbreak, on the other side of the world, in 2003. 

“My husband and I moved to Hong Kong in 1989, and we returned to the States in 2005,” said Eng. “So we got to see a lot of changes happen around the world. But in the latter part of our stay there, of course one of the most impactful changes, was when SARS hit.”

Todd Bookman/NHPR

There’s a gem of a plot of land in Kensington, in the southeastern corner of the state, that is usually closed to the public.

But with the stress of the coronavirus taking a toll, the owners of the Alnoba property are opening their arms to the community.

Courtesy of New Hampshire Department of Safety

A superior court judge has denied a request for a bail hearing made by the driver of a pick-up truck who crashed into a group of motorcycles in Randolph last June that left seven people dead.

Volodymyr Zhukovskyy is facing seven counts of negligent homicide, along with a range of other charges including driving while intoxicated, for his role in the accident involving the Jarheads Motorcycle Club, which is made up of Marine Corps members and their families.

Josh Rogers

Gov. Chris Sununu announced new measures Monday to slow the spread of the coronavirus in New Hampshire, as newly-released testing results reveal the toll the disease is taking on the state's healthcare workers.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Governor Sununu is asking the Executive Council to waive a public hearing for Eddie Edwards to serve as the director of the state’s Office of Professional Licensure and Certification.

Edwards, who ran for congress as a Republican in 2018, was nominated earlier this month.

Sununu is requesting the confirmation be fast-tracked so that Lindsey Courtney, who has been serving as interim executive director, can return to her full-time position overseeing public health licensing.

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