Todd Bookman

Reporter

Todd started at NHPR in 2009 as an intern, and in 2011, took over the health beat. He spent two years at WHYY in Philadelphia covering health and science, before returning to NHPR in 2016 as a general assignment reporter with a focus on business and economics. He holds a master’s degree in public administration from Columbia University.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of Paula Martin Group

The Currier Museum is adding a second Frank Lloyd Wright home to its collection.

The museum announced Friday that it purchased the Toufic H. Kalil House on Heather Street in Manchester. The concrete and glass structure is down the street from the Wright-designed Zimmerman House, which the Currier has opened for tours since 1990. 

The N.H. Liquor Commission says it is going to build new stores along Interstate 95, aiming to capitalize on the highway’s steady stream of motorists.

The current red barn-like structure on the southbound side of the highway opened in 1981. Fifteen years later, the Liquor Commission built a companion in the northbound lanes.

Both stores have been gold mines ever since, with the northbound store becoming the biggest-grossing outlet in the state, while the southbound store ranks fourth.

istock photo

A health care entity ordered by regulators to stop selling products is asking the state to let it keep its current members enrolled through the end of 2020.

The New Hampshire Insurance Department issued a cease and desist order in late October requiring Trinity HealthShare and a partner company, Aliera, to immediately stop selling or renewing “illegal health insurance” in New Hampshire.

[Read NHPR's previous coverage of this story here.]

Todd Bookman/NHPR

U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson met with formerly homeless veterans in Manchester on Tuesday.

Carson also released new statistics showing that the rate of veterans experiencing homelessness dipped by 2% nationally, but by more than 20% in New Hampshire.

CREDIT CREDIT BAISHAMPAYAN GHOSE VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Voters in New Hampshire cities delivered a mixed message Tuesday on whether to allow sports gambling parlors in their communities.

A ballot measure that would permit sports betting passed in Manchester, Berlin, Claremont, Laconia and Somersworth. 

[You can read more about sports gambling here]

But voters in Nashua, Concord, Dover and Rochester voted down allowing gambling halls in their municipalities.

Credit Baishampayan Ghose via Wikimedia Commons

State lawmakers approved sports gambling earlier this year, but left up to voters the ability to opt-in for having any retail gambling facilities in their community. On Tuesday, residents of nine New Hampshire cities will get to weigh in. Here’s a quick primer on the issue:

Earlier this year, news broke about a painting stolen from an art gallery in Meredith. There aren’t many art heists in New Hampshire, which got us interested in learning more about the artist who made the painting.

It turns out his life story is a remarkable one, with detours through the state prison and a 1988 exhibition that would reshape his life.  

iStock

The New Hampshire attorney general’s office is ordering a health care entity to immediately stop doing business in the state after it failed to properly register as a charitable organization.

The attorney general’s action comes a day after the Insurance Department also ordered Georgia-based Trinity HealthShare, along with another entity, Aliera Healthcare, to cease offering was it called “illegal health insurance” to customers in New Hampshire.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

The company barred from selling health plans by the New Hampshire Insurance Department this week includes on its board of directors the man who served as the state’s top insurance regulator until last summer.

Ali Oshinskie / NHPR

Lawyers for the ACLU of New Hampshire and the state’s Department of Justice met Wednesday for the latest hearing in a federal court case over a Republican-backed law that alters the definition of who qualifies as a state resident. 

Todd Bookman/NHPR

A federal judge has ruled that an Exeter, New Hampshire man’s lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the state’s criminal defamation statute can proceed, rejecting the Attorney General’s request to dismiss the suit.

https://youtu.be/JQAFzBpM0YM

Edward and Elaine Brown, the Plainfield couple who led a months-long armed stand-off with U.S. marshals over their refusal to pay federal income taxes, could be re-sentenced following a separate U.S. Supreme Court ruling.

A woman detained in county jail for nearly two weeks and subjected to a body cavity search has filed a lawsuit in federal court, contending that her civil rights were violated.

According to court paperwork filed earlier this month and first reported by Seacoast Online, Robyn White, 44, of Avon, Maine, alleges that New Hampshire State Police pulled her over on I-95 on Feb. 10, 2017 for snow covering her rear lights.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Two very different groups took to the State House on Wednesday. The first called for the impeachment of President Donald Trump, while the second was decked out in ‘Make America Great Again’ T-shirts. 

Neither side, however, appeared to be drawing many people to their cause. 

David Lane/Union Leader (Pool Photo)

A Manchester man accused of shooting two people during a wedding ceremony earlier this month was arraigned Tuesday on an additional charge after allegedly assaulting his attorney. 

Dale Holloway, 37, appeared in a Manchester courtroom where he pleaded not guilty to first degree assault, which carries a sentence of up to 15 years in prison. 

CREDIT DON TREEGER/THE REPUBLICAN VIA AP, POOL

A Coos County grand jury has indicted the driver of a truck that crashed into a group of motorcycles on 23 different charges, including manslaughter and driving under the influence.

Seven motorcyclists were killed when Vladimir Zhukovskyy, 25, allegedly swerved into oncoming traffic on Route 2 in Randolph last June. The riders were all members of the Jarhead Motorcycle Club, which is made up of Marine Corps members and their families.

File Photo/NHPR

The New Hampshire Liquor Commission has settled a dispute with a former employee who it accused of violating store policy and subsequently fired.

Backers of the former employee, however, describe him as a whistleblower who was retaliated against for shedding light on alleged ‘bootlegging’ at state-run liquor stores.

NHPR

The Democrats hoping to win their party’s nomination for president represent the most diverse field in history. Along with age, race, and sexual orientation, the candidates also come with a broad range of religious and spiritual beliefs. As they make their way across New Hampshire, some candidates are talking about those beliefs in ways Democrats usually don’t.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu says that while he continues to oppose the impeachment of President Donald Trump, he does believe the whistleblower who filed a complaint concerning the president’s alleged pressuring of the leader of Ukraine should be “protected.”

Lois Hurley for NHPR

A newly unsealed affidavit sheds more light on what led to a car crash in Randolph this summer that killed seven motorcyclists, all members of a club for military veterans. 

Rouven74/Wikimedia Commons

New Hampshire gunmaker SIG Sauer is facing another proposed class action lawsuit over claims its popular P320 pistol can inadvertently fire without a trigger pull.

In a complaint filed in federal court in Concord, Derek Ortiz, an Arizona gun owner, alleges that SIG Sauer’s model P320 pistol contains a design flaw that allows it to discharge when dropped, and that the Newington-based company continued to sell the flawed gun to the public after discovering its potential for malfunction.

C-Span

Senator Jeanne Shaheen says she will prioritize the needs of patients over the concerns of private equity firms.

Her remarks come in the wake of reporting by the New York Times that revealed a $28 million advertising campaign raising concerns about proposed legislation aimed at curbing "surprise medical bills" is being funded by companies that benefit from the practice. 

Baishampayan Ghose via Wikimedia Commons

The Lottery Commission is sifting through more than a dozen bids from vendors looking to manage sports gambling in New Hampshire.

State officials announced Monday that it received 13 responses to its request for proposal to oversee both online and in-person sports wagering.

The legislature approved sports gambling earlier this year, greenlighting up to 10 physical locations around the state. Similar to the rollout of Keno, municipalities will need to get approval of local voters before any facilities can start taking bets. 

New Hampshire-based defense contractors, military personnel and research universities should be on guard against foreign adversaries trying to steal information, according to senior FBI officials.

The state is home to more than 80 defense contractors with security clearance, as well as multiple military installations and university research and development campuses that are at risk, says Joe Bonavolonta, Special Agent in charge of the FBI’s Boston Division, who spoke with NHPR on Thursday.

Courtesy of the Paula Martin Group

New Hampshire may not be a hotbed of modern architecture, but in the quiet North End neighborhood in Manchester, there are not one, but two Frank Lloyd Wright houses on the same street.

That’s the result of one family, the Kalils, being inspired by another family, the Zimmermans. 

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Hotel conference rooms can be suffocating, the type of places where energy and creativity get ground down, leaving permanent stains in the beige carpet. 

But the mood is very different, very alive at the Autumn Seacoast Psychic Fair, held inside the Hampton Inn in Exeter. 

Courtesy of WNYC

Jim Schachter will take over as CEO of New Hampshire Public Radio, the station announced Monday, succeeding former chief executive Betsy Gardella, who resigned abruptly last October.

Schachter previously held the top news executive position at WNYC, the country’s largest public media station. In his role there, he oversaw programs including On the Media, The Brian Lehrer Show and Radio Rookies. Before joining WNYC, Schachter spent nearly 17 years at the New York Times, where he held the position of associate managing editor. 

Rouven74/Wikimedia Commons

Transit police officers in Philadelphia will no longer carry SIG Sauer pistols after a weapon allegedly fired without a trigger pull.

On Aug. 26, SEPTA officials say an officer’s SIG Sauer P320 pistol discharged while still in its holster during rush hour inside of a subway station. No one was injured in the incident, and an investigation remains ongoing. 

However, the agency is pulling its entire inventory of 350 P320 pistols out of service, and will replace them with Glock pistols. 

The New Hampshire Liquor Commission is cancelling a $26 million contract with a private software firm, citing poor performance by the company. 

New York-based AlfaPeople, which won the 10-year contract in 2016 through a competitive bid, failed to meet its obligations, according to the state Liquor Commission. 

Courtesy of Camp Yavneh

NHPR is exploring Route 4 this summer: its sights and sounds and can’t miss stops, along with some of the curious places that exist just off the historic highway.

That includes a little known camp that has welcomed Jewish kids and families for 75 years. Camp Yavneh offers all of the must-have summer activities: swimming, s’mores, arts and crafts, and games.

But it also provides kosher meals, an on-site rabbi to lead prayers, and a rich Shabbat celebration to welcome in the day of rest on Friday evenings. 

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