Sam Evans-Brown | New Hampshire Public Radio

Sam Evans-Brown

Host, Outside/In

 

Sam Evans-Brown has been working for New Hampshire Public Radio since 2010, when he began as a freelancer. He shifted gears in 2016 and began producing Outside/In, a podcast and radio show about “the natural world and how we use it.” His work has won him several awards, including two regional Edward R. Murrow awards, one national Murrow, and the Overseas Press Club of America's award for best environmental reporting in any medium. He studied Politics and Spanish at Bates College, and before reporting was variously employed as a Spanish teacher, farmer, bicycle mechanic, ski coach, research assistant, a wilderness trip leader and a technical supporter.

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Negotiations between the faculty union and the administration at the University of New Hampshire broke down for the second time in a year yesterday.

NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown has the story.

UNH’s negotiator says that in light of the quote “epic” reductions in state funding to the university system, it’s only reasonable to ask professors to share in the cuts.

But the faculty’s negotiator, Dale Barkee, says that pressure to reduce salary and benefits began before cuts in the state’s contribution.

A New Hampshire interest group says they are disappointed with the Republican Party’s push to repeal gay marriage.

NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown reports.

Standing up for New Hampshire families calls itself a bipartisan group of citizens who oppose repealing New Hampshire’s 2009 gay marriage law.

At a press conference in Concord, the group urged the legislature to listen to their constituents, who support gay marriage 2 to 1.

The group’s spokesperson Tyler Deaton says that his group wants lawmakers to work on other issues.

Public Service of New Hampshire announced today it wants to increase its rates.

NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tells us why.

PSNH has asked the Public Utilities commission for a rate increase of a little more than a half cent per kilowatt hour.

For the typical resident that would mean about three dollars and seventy-seven cents more every month.

The hike will pay for a new scrubber designed to clean up emissions from PSNH’s coal burning plant in Bow.

Massachusetts is expected to announce new rules that will raise the bar on the definition of green energy.

NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown reports that shift could cost NH electric producers millions of dollars.

Massachusetts is on track to pass new regulations aimed at cutting the amount of greenhouse gasses going into the atmosphere.

The focus is on power from biomass – basically, burning wood to make electricity.

Dwayne Breger of the Massachusetts Division of Energy Resources, says there are two good reasons to get the most out of every tree.

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