Josh Rogers

Senior Political Reporter and Editor

Josh has worked at NHPR since 2000 and serves as NHPR’s State House reporter. Before joining the staff, he lived in New York, where he worked for a number of different magazines.

Josh’s award winning reporting can be heard locally but also regularly airs on national broadcasts of NPR’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Josh is also a frequent analyst on political talk shows in the state. He grew up in Concord, and holds a Bachelor of Arts in American Studies from Reed College.

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Josh Rogers for NHPR

The political arm of Planned Parenthood of Northern New England is endorsing former state senator Molly Kelly in the race for governor. 

File photo

Steve Marchand is running for the Governor as a loud and unapologetic liberal. And whether the topic is guns, abortion, campaign finance or energy, the former Portsmouth mayor’s is working to ensure his stance is the most progressive in the race.

But, to see Steve Marchand as a pure liberal is to look past a long and mixed list of political affiliations.


josh rogers / nhpr

Right now New Hampshire's goal is to have 25 percent of local electricity derived from renewable sources by 2025. Steve Marchand wants renewables to count for 50 percent by 2030.

Marchand says Massachusetts, Vermont, and Maine are headed in that direction and New Hampshire would be wise to join them.

"I think this is a reasonable number. There are thousands of jobs in growing parts of the economy that I think are sitting there, if we are willing and able to lead on being more aggressive about increasing the percentage of our mix that comes from renewable resources."

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

By all accounts yesterday was an embarrassing day for political leaders in Concord. The bill they crafted, at Gov. Chris Sununu’s direction, aimed to blunt a U.S. Supreme court ruling that could force local business to collect taxes for other states. It was rejected by the New Hampshire House. NHPR’s Josh Rogers and Peter Biello talked about the political ramifications of the bill's failure, particularly for Sununu.

Josh Rogers / NHPR

It will be bottoms up in Concord on Saturday when a crowd gathers to toast the New Hampshire State House's 200th anniversary.

The "Toast to the Eagle" will feature a recitation of the 13 toasts made on July 18, 1818, the day the carved eagle was set atop the State House dome. The beer will come by Henniker Brewing Company. Its founder, Dave Currier, served in both the New Hampshire House and Senate. 

Dan Tuohy for NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu has signed a bill that eliminates the distinction between "residency" and "domicile" for voting purposes. The move comes a day after the state Supreme Sourt issued a split opinion finding the bill constitutional.

The governor said he sought the court's opinion on the bill to "put the issue to rest once and for all." 

Todd Bookman / NHPR

A divided New Hampshire Supreme Court says a bill eliminating the distinction between residency and domicile is constitutional.

The governor sought the court's input on House Bill 1264, which aims to require people who vote here -- like college students -- to abide by other residency requirements, like getting a driver's license or registering their cars.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Newly released documents indicate that New Hampshire state Senate leaders reassigned a staffer under the supervision of Bedford senator and congressional candidate Andy Sanborn in 2014 amid concerns over inappropriate comments. 

The AG last month cleared Sanborn and found no wrongdoing when it investigated the possible bribing of a former Senate intern who had been the target of a suggestive joke.

Josh Rogers for NHPR

Abortion rights have become a major issue in New Hampshire's Democratic gubernatorial primary.

“The confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, means in almost certain terms the overturning of Roe V. Wade.”

That was Steve Marchand speaking in Portsmouth Tuesday.

As they introduce themselves to voters, Democratic gubernatorial candidates Molly Kelly and Steve Marchand are both playing up their modest origins.

The particulars - Kelly was a single mom, Marchand is the son of immigrants who never graduated from high school - are a clear contrast to Governor Sununu. But this focus also makes them something rare in recent state politics. 


Governor Chris Sununu has released the findings of his school safety task force, which include 59 recommendations that range from gun laws to school building design. (Scroll down to read the full report.)

The task force was asked to give "practical, actionable recommendations from areas of agreement" among its members. These include urging the legislature to pass a law mandating at least one annual fire drills be used to test emergency response to an armed assailant.

Josh Rogers for NHPR

Democrat Molly Kelly says the retirement of Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy should be a wake up call for Democrats.

Kelly says the threat to abortion rights and gay rights are reasons to back her over Governor Chris Sununu.

Molly Kelly still has a primary to win, but as she campaigned outside the superior court in Manchester, she was using rhetoric usually reserved for a the home stretch of a general election.

Standing before supporters holding signed with slogans like "Trust Women" and "Save Roe," Kelly said she always had, and always would, stand with women.

Josh Rogers for NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu will call lawmakers back to Concord to fight any effort by other states to force New Hampshire businesses to collect sales taxes on customers who buy goods across state lines. 

Annie Ropeik for NHPR

New Hampshire’s two Democratic candidates for governor have been hitting the campaign trail hard this summer – but so far, they haven’t had much of an audience.

Molly Kelly and Steve Marchand are struggling to draw attention to their primary race – while focused on targeting incumbent Republican Governor Chris Sununu.

Jon Greenberg, NHPR

Gym chain Planet Fitness is allowing teenagers from age 15 to 18 to work out for free this summer at all of its New Hampshire gyms.

The goal, says Planet Fitness CEO Chris Rondeau, is to encourage teens to get fit and do so at a time of year when gyms tend to be less crowded.

"The facilities are open, they are open 24 hours a day," he said.

NHPR Staff

A group of seven Republican state representatives is challenging the nonprofit status of the conservative policy group Americans for Prosperity.

AFP announced weeks ago that it would be conducting a campaign to call out lawmakers who voted against right-to-work, one of the group’s policy priorities for years. The state reps challenging AFP's status were all targets of mailers criticizing them for voting against right-to-work legislation.

The state reps say they want to the state to weigh whether AFP should be required to register with the state as a political committee.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

An intern working for New Hampshire Senator Maggie Hassan was caught on video swearing at President Donald Trump last week.

Senator Maggie Hassan's intern yelled, "Mr. President………" followed by an expletive, across the Capitol Rotunda at President Trump as his entourage entered the building.

That Hassan decided to suspend the intern, Keene State College Student Caitlin Marriott, for one week was first reported late Monday.

The video of the incident has since gone viral. Governor Sununu says he hopes Senator Hassan will decide to do what he called "the right thing."

After 18 months on the job, Jeanie Forrester is stepping down as leader of the New Hampshire Republican Party.

Citing "an opportunity to work with local government" Forrester announced her resignation in a late afternoon letter sent to her party's executive committee. 

Her resignation comes as both parties gear up for election season. It also follows campaign finance filings showing the state Democratic Party out-raising the New Hampshire GOP by close to 9-1.

Jason Moon for NHPR

The Marsy's Law amendment aimed to spell out new rights for victims of sexual and domestic violence in New Hampshire.

And despite having the backing of Governor Chris Sununu, and key lawmakers in both parties, the measure failed badly in the New Hampshire House.

But according to state filings, money doesn't appear to have been the problem. The campaign behind the effort, Marsy's Law For New Hampshire, spent $367,000 to boost the proposal.

josh rogers / nhpr

Governor Chris Sununu signaled he'd veto the death penalty repeal long before lawmakers sent one to his desk. So, at the event his press team billed as an announcement on the repeal bill, the only real suspense was over how many police officers Sununu could squeeze into his office to witness his veto.

With a political resume that includes twenty years in New Hampshire Senate, three terms on the Executive Council, time in the New Hampshire House and a run for governor, Manchester’s Lou D’Allesandro can, at this point, rightly claim to being something of a New Hampshire political institution. 

Josh Rogers for NHPR

Democrat Steve Marchand made his run for governor official. The former Portsmouth mayor says he sees himself as the frontrunner.

Marchand says he hopes to bring progressive values and an auditor's sensibility to the corner office. After he filed his campaign, he said 200 plus campaign events he's held and the thousands of voters he's talked to have taught him a valuable lesson: dDmocrats  want a candidate who is capable of being frank and getting specific.

Josh Rogers for NHPR

State Democrats are gearing up to try do something they haven’t had to do in 14 years: reclaim the governor’s office from an incumbent Republican.

But before they get to the general election, the Democrats will have to select a nominee, a choice between former state senator Molly Kelly and former Portsmouth mayor Steve Marchand.

Joining Rick Ganley to discuss that race is NHPR’s Josh Rogers. 

NHPR File Photo

Governor Chris Sununu says he's concerned by the public feud between the largest state employees union and the top managers of the New Hampshire Liquor Commission.

But, as NHPR's Josh Rogers reports, he says the commission's top manager has his confidence.

NHPR File Photo

New Hampshire's Attorney General's office says it has few details on a deal that could transfer ownership of Mount Sunapee Resort to Colorado-based Vail resorts.

When Vail resorts announced an agreement to buy Triple Peaks LLC, the company that owns the Sunapee Resort, Okemo Mountain in Vermont, and Crested Butte in Colorado, Vail said the land lease transfers for the properties in New Hampshire and Vermont will require permission from state regulators.

josh rogers / nhpr

U.S. Senator Maggie Hassan is the latest high-profile Democrat to back Molly Kelly in her bid to unseat Governor Chris Sununu.

According to Hassan , Kelly's record in the state senate -- where Kelly served five terms -- and her life story -- Kelly put herself through school while raising three children as a single mother -- prove she understands the challenges faced by New Hampshire families.

Former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder says his fight against gerrymandering is a partisan attempt at good governing. Holder was in New Hampshire Friday, promoting what he calls "fair redistricting."

Jason Moon for NHPR

With lawmakers gone from Concord, the 2018 political season is now officially on, and one New Hampshire politician making a quick shift to campaign mode is Gov. Chris Sununu. 

New Hampshire’s first Republican governor in more than a decade is hitting the trail with a mixed record at the Statehouse but plenty of enthusiasm.

Josh Rogers for NHPR

Businesses that focus on generating human organs won't have to pay state business taxes for ten years under a bill signed into law today by Governor Chris Sununu. Backers of the bill, including companies set to benefit, say it could mean great things for New Hampshire. 

Josh Rogers for NHPR

Second District Congresswoman Ann McLane Kuster is promoting the latest version of what she calls her Jobs and Opportunity Agenda.

Kuster talked up ways to develop the state's workforce during a visit to Nashua Community College. 

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