Jack Rodolico | New Hampshire Public Radio

Jack Rodolico

Senior Producer/Reporter, Podcasts & Special Projects

Jack has spent his career in public radio and podcasting producing narrative-driven investigative journalism that delivers an emotional impact. He is the recipient of more than a dozen local and national awards, including a National Edward R. Murrow Award and finalist nods from the Scripps Howard Foundation and the Dart Award for Excellence in Coverage of Trauma.

Jack was the lead reporter on “A Mountain of Misconduct” and “Heroin Diaries”, both collaborations with Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting. He was senior reporter on “Last Seen”, a podcast from WBUR and The Boston Globe about the greatest art heist in history.

He has covered opioid addiction for National Public Radio and he reported and produced “Monumental Dilemma” for 99% Invisible, a story about the racist origins of the oldest monument dedicated to a woman in the United States.

NHPR

The New Hampshire chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union released a report today that details the practice of judges jailing poor people who can’t afford to pay fines – a practice that’s illegal.

Flickr/Johan J.Ingles-Le Nobel

New Hampshire has confirmed a batch of mosquitos in Manchester tested positive for West Nile Virus.

So far this year, the public health lab has tested over 3,000 batches of mosquitos, 46 people and two animals for various mosquito-borne illnesses. Even though this is the first confirmed instance of West Nile Virus, state epidemiologist Benjamin Chan has a warning.

Jack Rodolico

Democratic presidential candidates and their surrogates lined up to address union members at the annual AFL-CIO Labor Day breakfast.

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders gave a rowdy keynote address to union members at a Greek Orthodox Church in Manchester. Sanders spoke about his opposition to international trade deals like NAFTA, as well as his long support for union workers - including during last year’s strike against FairPoint Communications.

Jack Rodolico

Manchester is getting a $2.9 million grant from the U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development to remediate lead hazards in 175 housing units.

While this is the fourth time the Queen City has received the federal grant, the announcement from Senator Jeanne Shaheen's office comes on the heels of a new state law aimed at educating families about lead hazards, and as one of the state's largest landlords faces a lawsuit over lead contamination in a Manchester apartment complex.

At a recent town meeting in Madison, just south of Conway, a tiny room was packed: five zoning board members sat at a table in front of the police chief, frustrated neighbors and attorneys for a company called Becket Family of Services. The mood was tense. This was the third meeting like this one, and the prior two ended in stalemates.

H.A. Kimball

The way New Hampshire cares for people with mental illness and developmental disabilities has changed dramatically over the past 200 years.

The shifts in approach have been urged on by advances in drugs and science, legislative mandate, budget cuts, and the force of media and popular culture.

Just 25 years ago, New Hampshire was a national leader in caring for people with mental and physical disabilities. Today, the state ranks closer to the bottom, and New Hampshire is in the middle of a period of dramatic change.

It was nearly a year ago that widespread abuse at Lakeview Neurorehabilitation Center in Effingham came to light. Now, Lakeview is shutting down.

The facility is a treatment center for people with brain injuries and intellectual disabilities. And as New Hampshire faces a future without Lakeview, families and state regulators are deciding where to send people with highly challenging behaviors. 

Brett Levin/Flickr

A growing majority of Granite Staters support loosening state laws on marijuana, according to a survey from WMUR and the University of New Hampshire.

Sixty percent of residents support legalizing marijuana. That’s up from 54 percent a year ago. Support is strongest among liberals, younger adults and non-churchgoers.

Jack Rodolico

Ohio Governor John Kasich wraps up a three-day swing through New Hampshire today, his first stretch of campaigning since officially joining the race for the Republican presidential nomination this week.

In front of crowds in Nashua and the Seacoast, Kasich’s stump speech was essentially an annotated version of his life story -- a  weaving together of what he calls his record of working across party lines with a personal history rooted firmly in the middle class.

Jack Rodolico / NHPR

Ohio Governor John Kasich made his first official campaign stop in New Hampshire as a presidential hopeful last night. The Republican candidate spoke to a friendly crowd at Rivier University in Nashua that included both long-time supporters and undecided voters.

Jack Rodolico

Shaghaf Mohammed has seen too much in her 11 years. Her family fled Iraq in 2013. And when they left, they never could have guessed the battle they’d face in their new home in Manchester. Shaghaf’s four-year-old sister, Aleel, is sick with lead poisoning.

Jack Rodolico for NHPR

A new state law aims to boost the number of children screened for lead poisoning. There's good reason New Hampshire is aiming for that goal.

Children aged 0-6 are the most likely to suffer permanent health and cognitive damage from lead exposure. Yet in 2013, New Hampshire tested a mere 16.5 percent of children in this age group for elevated blood lead levels. That's concerning because 62 percent of New Hampshire's houses were built before 1978 - the year the federal government cracked down on lead paint.

Thomas Fearon / NHPR

Last year, New Hampshire settled a class action lawsuit that alleged the state was violating the civil rights of people with mental illness. In the settlement, the state agreed to spend $30 million over four years to beef up services for those individuals.

Now, one year into the deal, a report from a court-appointed monitor says the state hasn’t yet hit the benchmarks it agreed to.

Bad news first

Thomas Fearon / NHPR

A new report finds New Hampshire is struggling to improve its mental health system, as it agreed to in a $30 million dollar lawsuit settlement. 

A court-appointed monitor finds, one year into the settlement, the state is lagging on nearly every benchmark. 

Jack Rodolico

The national death rate from knee replacement surgery is about one in a thousand. But patients are three times more likely to die if they have their knee replaced at a hospital that doesn’t perform that surgery frequently.

Now three leading healthcare systems, including Dartmouth-Hitchcock, are putting restrictions on their surgeons. 

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Eric Fleming

One of New Hampshire’s largest landlords, Brady Sullivan Properties, is under scrutiny from city, state and federal regulators for lead contamination in one of its buildings in Manchester. 

Conway Daily Sun/Jamie Gemmiti

Lakeview Neurorehabilitation Center in Effingham is telling employees it plans to close as early as August 1. This comes amid new reports of a sexual assault at the facility.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

In recent months, tenants of Manchester's Mill West complex have been complaining of construction-related lead dust in their apartments. The building's developer, Brady Sullivan Properties, has faced scrutiny from state and municipal health agencies over the issue. Compiled from news reports, interviews with regulators, and tenant correspondence, the timeline below tracks the developments in this ongoing story.

Flicker/M&R Glasgow

As of July 1, all babies born in New Hampshire will be screened for a rare genetic disorder.

Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disorder, or SCID, is often called “the bubble boy disease.” Trish Tilley with the Department of Health and Human Services explains why.  

"This is when babies just really can’t fight off any infection," says Tilley. "It’s a very rare, inherited disorder."

Liz West via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/8DoUxw

More than one-third of New Hampshire children experience one of the most preventable childhood diseases: tooth decay.

Jack Rodolico

The Environmental Protection Agency is taking action against Brady Sullivan Properties because of lead contamination.

The order demands Brady Sullivan clean up a mixed commercial and luxury apartment building in Manchester by July 15, and lays the groundwork for EPA to potentially fine or sue the landlord.

In May, Brady Sullivan hired a contractor to do sandblasting in Mill West, a converted mill. The contractor didn’t have the proper permits, and spread lead dust into more than three-quarters of the apartments above.

Jack Rodolico

As the next state budget takes shape, Gov. Maggie Hassan and legislative leaders have been debating how to fund New Hampshire's mental health system. The state spends more than $100 million each year providing these services, and one word sums up the sentiment in the mental health community right now: uncertainty.

  Case in point, a construction site at New Hampshire Hospital.

Brady-Sullivan Properties

Twenty Manchester residents are suing one of New Hampshire’s largest landlords for lead contamination in their apartments.

The state has announced which companies will be allowed to move forward with plans to open a medical marijuana dispensary.

Last November, our newsroom got an email from a guy in Manchester who said he wanted to share his story of spice addiction. He said: “It was not long for the culture of Spice within the city to suck my soul into the black hole.”

Jack Rodolico

The state is giving a first look at insurance networks for 2016 under the Affordable Care Act.

Every hospital in the state will be covered by at least two of the insurance plans that will be sold on Healthcare.gov in 2016. There will also be an uptick in the total number of plans over this year.

Two of the smallest insurers on New Hampshire’s health insurance exchange are drafting big rate increases for plans they’ll offer in 2016.

To be clear, it’s just a draft. But Maine Community Health Options is considering raising premiums about 20 percent over this year, and Minuteman Health is in the 40 to 50 percent range.

Aaron P. Bernstein Getty Images

Anthem is partnering with Southern New Hampshire University to offer a free college education to all its employees.

Two years ago, Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield in New Hampshire started a pilot program with SNHU’s College for America, which helps working adults complete a bachelor’s or associates degree for $2,500 per year or less. Now Anthem New Hampshire’s parent company, which operates in 14 states, will expand the program to any employee working more than 20 hours per week.

Jack Rodolico

Lakeview Neurorehabilitation Center will close its doors. This follows months of scrutiny after documented cases of abuse and neglect.

Lakeview CEO Chris Slover says if the state won’t allow the facility’s special education school to remain open, then he will not be able to keep the entire facility open – that includes an 88-bed treatment facility for people with brain injuries and other disabilities.

"I don’t have a choice. What they’re asking us to do is unrealistic," Slover says.

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