NPR News

This past week, republican presidential candidate Herman Cain has been hit hard over his 9-9-9 tax overhaul plan. During the last Republican debate, Cain's plan was attacked as regressive, meaning that it would hit the middle-class and poor Americans hardest.

Robert Dreyfuss, a Nation contributing editor, is an investigative journalist specializing in politics and national security.

Putting gobs of lipstick on the Iraq War pig, President Obama announced today that all US forces, except for a tiny number to protect the not-so-tiny US embassy in Iraq, were coming home. Said Obama:

President Obama is on a campaign swing through the West this week, making stops in California, Nevada and Colorado — all states where Hispanic voters will play a pivotal role in next year's election.

Obama has lost popularity with Latinos recently, mostly due to the economy. But Hispanic voters looking for alternatives find problems with the Republican slate as well.

GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain recently said he'd "electrify" the U.S.-Mexico border fence "with a sign on it on the other side that says it can kill you."

David Bosco reports on the new world order for The Multilateralist.

Update at 5:42 p.m. ET. As expected, President Obama announced that his administration was easing the terms of a federal program that would open the doors for homeowners to refinancing their homes no matter how far underwater their mortgage is.

The AP reports that the Federal Housing Finance Administration "estimated an additional 1 million people would qualify. Moody's Analytics say the figure could be as high as 1.6 million."

We wanted to share the following note from Michele Norris, which she sent to our staff and stations today. Listen for Michele's personal message this afternoon on All Things Considered.

Hello everyone,

I need to share some news and I wanted to make sure my NPR family heard this first.

Barry Duncan has an obsession that follows him everywhere he goes. "I see street signs, restaurant menus, objects while I'm walking along, and I'm just reversing them all the time," he tells Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered.

Duncan is a master palindromist. He creates phrases, sentences, even passages that read the same forward and backward. He's been at it since 1981, when he was working at a bookstore in Philadelphia and stumbled onto a book of wordplay.

[Spoiler alert: This review gives away some elements of the story.]

When a friend gave me Merce Rodoreda's Death in Spring, he told me it would blow my mind. Ten pages in, I doubted his claim.

The book begins when the narrator, a 14-year-old boy from a small mountain village, slips into a cold, sometimes savage river to escape a bee. His swim is interspersed with descriptions of his isolated community, with its pink painted homes and wisteria vines that "over the years, upwrenched houses."

NPR's Mara Liasson spoke with Republican presidential candidate Michele Bachmann in New Hampshire on Tuesday. The full transcript of that interview is below. Read the edited version of the interview.

MARA LIASSON: You're now a top-tier candidate. How do you build on the momentum that you clearly have in Iowa so that you don't end up like Mike Huckabee, who came out of there like a cannon and then didn't have the resources to go further?

Republican presidential candidate Rep. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota continues her announcement tour in South Carolina on Wednesday. Bachmann's strong performance in debates and on the stump has vaulted her out of the second tier of candidates.

On Tuesday, Bachmann stopped at a backyard event in Raymond, N.H. Poised and polished, she slung the applause lines as she attacked President Obama:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SUSAN STAMBERG, host:

Chuck Brown, the Godfather of Go-Go music, died in 2012. A year earlier, he'd stopped by World Cafe to discuss his 50-plus-year career and his last album.

Pages