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In his announcement today declaring a national emergency, President Trump repeatedly mentioned that previous presidents have called national emergencies.

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President Trump has declared a national emergency because he says that's what it is - an invasion, he called it today, of drugs and criminals coming into our country.

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In 1993, a 24-year-old woman named Lorena Bobbitt reacted violently to what she said was a long-term pattern of marital abuse — sexual and otherwise — by severing the penis of her husband, John Wayne Bobbitt, then driving away and tossing the remnant out her car window.

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With a single line, President Trump fanned the flames of a push in Iraq to expel U.S. forces, just as he declared he wanted to keep troops in the country.

"We spent a fortune on building this incredible base. We might as well keep it," Trump said in a CBS interview on Feb. 3, referring to the Ain al-Asad military base in Iraq's western desert. "And one of the reasons I want to keep it is because I want to be looking a little bit at Iran because Iran is a real problem."

Former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld said Friday he is thinking about challenging President Trump for the 2020 Republican presidential nomination.

Weld, a moderate Republican, was twice elected governor. He supports abortion rights and was an early proponent of gay rights.

He resigned his post as governor after being offered the ambassadorship to Mexico, but the nomination stalled in the Senate after opposition from other Republicans.

Weld then ran as the Libertarian Party's vice presidential nominee in 2016 on a ticket with former New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson.

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Just a short time ago, President Trump stood in the Rose Garden and declared a national emergency to secure funding for his long-promised border wall.

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Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET

Calling it "a great thing to do," President Trump declared a national emergency on Friday in order to help finance a long-promised wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. It's a highly unusual move from an unconventional president.

The New Hampshire primary is tentatively scheduled for Feb. 11, 2020, which is only — or "still," depending on your tolerance for campaign coverage — about a year away.

And for the past half-century, one of the most recognizable symbols of the Granite State's early electoral contest has been Dixville Notch's midnight vote.

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Nigerians vote for a new president tomorrow. And they're going to have a lot of choices. There are more than 70 candidates who want the top job in Africa's most populous nation. NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports.

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NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Sen. Angus King, I-Maine, of the Armed Services committee, about President Trump's plan to declare a national emergency to build a wall along the Southern border.

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For decades, the rate of cancer incidence and deaths from the disease among African-Americans in the United States far outpaced that of whites. But the most recent analysis of national data by the American Cancer Society suggests that "cancer gap" is shrinking: In recent years, death rates from four major cancers have declined more among blacks than among whites.

The report was published online Thursday in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society.

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Live-Action Short Films

If the theme of this year's animated short Oscar nominees was "parenthood," the theme of 2019's live-action shorts is "boys in trouble."

A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, James Cameron worked for Roger Corman, the king of fast-and-cheap exploitation moviemaking. But in the flaming nightmare dystopia of A.D. 2019 Los Angeles, he now takes so long to make movies that the three-to-10-year lifespans of Hollywood trends scarcely trouble him. Case in point: The Cameron-co-written-and-produced — but Robert-Rodriguez-directed — Alita: Battle Angel, which the King of the World first announced his intention to make some 20 years ago.

The most French of notable Korean directors, Hong Sang-soo has made more than a few talky movies in which people ponder their existence while at the beach, as if in an Eric Rohmer film. (Two of these Hong movies are even set at a French beach.) Snow replaces sand in the writer-director's Hotel by the River, but otherwise the scenario is familiar.

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