WebHeader_Grove.png
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Get 2 limited-edition podcast mugs when you make a sustaining gift of $8 or more per month today!

Nation's Worst Dressers Are In Anchorage, Survey Says

High fashion in Anchorage. (Just kidding! It's a photo from the 2011 Iditarod.)
Michael Dinneen
/
AP
High fashion in Anchorage. (Just kidding! It's a photo from the 2011 Iditarod.)

Which U.S. city has the worst-dressed citizens?

According to readers of Travel and Leisure magazine, it's Anchorage.

As paleoclimatologist Miriam Jones tells T&L, in Anchorage "it's not uncommon to see oversized parkas with fur-lined hoods and bunny boots, and people aren't alarmed when a person wearing a ski mask enters a room." She visited there often during a two-year research project.

But what would you expect, ask some who live in that Alaskan city. "You're not going to wear high heels out when it's been snowing six, eight, 10, 12 inches," Kris Natwick, membership director for the Anchorage Downtown Partnership, told The Associated Press. "You're going to dress appropriately for the weather."

The magazine's readers were asked to rank residents of 35 U.S. cities. The rest of the bottom five: Salt Lake City; Baltimore; Orlando; and San Antonio.

New Yorkers are the best dressed, T&L readers think. Others in the top five: San Juan, P.R.; Miami; San Francisco; and Los Angeles.

The Two-Way's hometown of Washington, D.C., ranked No. 22. We suspect T&L readers haven't seen how we dress — otherwise D.C. might have given Anchorage a run for its money.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Mark Memmott is NPR's supervising senior editor for Standards & Practices. In that role, he's a resource for NPR's journalists – helping them raise the right questions as they do their work and uphold the organization's standards.

You make NHPR possible.

NHPR is nonprofit and independent. We rely on readers like you to support the local, national, and international coverage on this website. Your support makes this news available to everyone.

Give today. A monthly donation of $5 makes a real difference.