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Scientists Seek Clues To Climate Change Inside World's Oldest Ice

The Collins glacier on King George Island has retreated in the last 10 years and shows signs of fragility, in the Antarctic on Feb. 2, 2018. (Mathilde Bellenger/AFP/Getty Images)
The Collins glacier on King George Island has retreated in the last 10 years and shows signs of fragility, in the Antarctic on Feb. 2, 2018. (Mathilde Bellenger/AFP/Getty Images)

Later this year, a group of European scientists will begin drilling for what’s believed to be the world’s oldest ice in Antarctica. The scientists believe the ice can tell us something important about climate change.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Olaf Eisen, a glaciologist and geophysicist at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven, Germany, and coordinator of the ice mission.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

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