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Union Rep. Explains Why 40,000 Verizon Workers Are On Strike

Hundreds of Verizon workers strike outside of the telecommunications company's Brooklyn offices on April 13, 2016 in New York City. Across the nation nearly 40,000 Verizon workers with the Communications Workers of America (CWA) and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) walked off their jobs Wednesday demanding a new contract. The workers' contract expired in August, and Verizon management has yet to negotiate a new one citing issues with health care expenses for its retired and current employees. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Hundreds of Verizon workers strike outside of the telecommunications company's Brooklyn offices on April 13, 2016 in New York City. Across the nation nearly 40,000 Verizon workers with the Communications Workers of America (CWA) and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) walked off their jobs Wednesday demanding a new contract. The workers' contract expired in August, and Verizon management has yet to negotiate a new one citing issues with health care expenses for its retired and current employees. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Almost 40,000 workers of Verizon Communications, Inc. went on strike Wednesday. The two sides were unable to reach an agreement after eight months without a new contract.

The employees, who mostly work on landline and internet operations on the East Coast, are represented by two major unions: the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers and the Communications Workers of America (CWA). Bob Master of the CWA District 1 speaks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about what pushed the workers to strike.

Note: Verizon Communications, Inc. did not respond to Here & Now’s request for comment.

Guest

  • Bob Master, assistant to the vice president of Communications Workers of America, District 1.

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