WebHeader_Grove.png
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Support independent journalism with your sustaining membership.

A College Campus Where Guns Are Welcome

Joe Orefice (right) is the former faculty adviser to the Paul Smith's College Fish and Game Club. He said the school has found a way to foster a safe gun culture that allows students to hunt on the college's 14,000 acre property. Also shown from right to left are student hunters Nathan Lafont, Antony Pernisi, Erika Ochs, and Michael Servant. (Brian Mann)
Joe Orefice (right) is the former faculty adviser to the Paul Smith's College Fish and Game Club. He said the school has found a way to foster a safe gun culture that allows students to hunt on the college's 14,000 acre property. Also shown from right to left are student hunters Nathan Lafont, Antony Pernisi, Erika Ochs, and Michael Servant. (Brian Mann)

This political season, there may be no issue more contentious than the debate over gun control and gun violence.

Much of that conversation has been driven by mass shootings at public schools and on college campuses. In response, schools across the country have implemented new safety measures.

Some states, like New York, have passed stricter gun regulations. But a handful of colleges around the country are moving in a different direction, embracing guns and trying to make them a safe part of their campus culture.

Brian Mann from Here & Now contributor North Country Public Radio brought us this story about Paul Smith's College in Paul Smiths, New York.

  • Read more via North Country Public Radio
  • Reporter

  • Brian Mann, Adirondack bureau chief for North Country Public Radio. He tweets @BrianMannADK.
  • Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

    You make NHPR possible.

    NHPR is nonprofit and independent. We rely on readers like you to support the local, national, and international coverage on this website. Your support makes this news available to everyone.

    Give today. A monthly donation of $5 makes a real difference.