WebHeader_Grove.jpg
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Make a gift to NHPR and have a Valentine's message to a loved one read on air!

Remote Alaskan Island Is A Boon To Bird Researchers

Biologist Jeff Williams, biologist Steve Ebbert and deck hand Andy Velsko return to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service research boat R/V Tiglax after checking the conditions to land researchers on Buldir Island in the Aleutians during a trip from Adak Island to Attu Island on a weeklong research mission in southwestern Alaska, on Tuesday, June 2, 2015. Scientists on the R/V Tiglax conduct research in the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. (Bob Hallinen/Alaska Dispatch News)
Biologist Jeff Williams, biologist Steve Ebbert and deck hand Andy Velsko return to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service research boat R/V Tiglax after checking the conditions to land researchers on Buldir Island in the Aleutians during a trip from Adak Island to Attu Island on a weeklong research mission in southwestern Alaska, on Tuesday, June 2, 2015. Scientists on the R/V Tiglax conduct research in the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. (Bob Hallinen/Alaska Dispatch News)

Imagine spending three months on a windy island at the tip of the Aleutian Islands in Alaska. There’s no Internet, no cellphones and not much company besides the millions of seabirds who flock to Buldir Island to build their nests.

For some wildlife biologists, that setup is paradise and they’ll do just about anything for the chance to find out what life looks like on Buldir. Lauren Rosenthal traveled to the island to bring back this story for Alaska Public Media.

Reporter

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.