WebHeader_Grove.jpg
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Join as a $13-a-month sustainer and get the retro NHPR t-shirt!

Does Being Lonely Impact Social Interactions?

A man walks along the edge of concrete blocks. (castgen/Flickr)
A man walks along the edge of concrete blocks. (castgen/Flickr)

Researchers at the University of Chicago have found that when you’re lonely, your brain may actually operate differently.

The researchers found that when lonely people are exposed to negative social cues of some kind, the electrical activity in their brains is more extreme. Meaning lonely people are subconsciously guarding against social threats, which could lead them to be even more isolated — and more lonely.

Here & Now host Peter O’Dowd speaks with Derek Thompson, senior editor with The Atlantic, on this research.

Guest

  • Derek Thompson, senior editor with The Atlantic. He tweets @DKThomp.
  • Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.