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Fewer Migrant Children Reach U.S. Border, As Mexico Steps Up Deportations

In this June 19, 2014 photo, a 14-year-old Guatemalan girl traveling alone waits for a northbound freight train along with other Central American migrants, in Arriaga, Chiapas state, Mexico. The United States has seen a dramatic increase in the number of Central American migrants crossing into its territory, particularly children traveling without any adult guardian. More than 52,000 unaccompanied children have been apprehended since October. (Rebecca Blackwell/AP)
In this June 19, 2014 photo, a 14-year-old Guatemalan girl traveling alone waits for a northbound freight train along with other Central American migrants, in Arriaga, Chiapas state, Mexico. The United States has seen a dramatic increase in the number of Central American migrants crossing into its territory, particularly children traveling without any adult guardian. More than 52,000 unaccompanied children have been apprehended since October. (Rebecca Blackwell/AP)

Mexico has been deporting record numbers of Central American children in recent months, according to a new study by the Pew Research Center.

Mexico deported more than 3,800 unaccompanied minors from October 2014 to February 2015, a 56 percent increase over the same period the previous year. That has contributed to the significant drop in the number of unaccompanied children crossing into the U.S. since last fall.

Here & Now’s Robin Young talks to Jens Manuel Krogstad, a writer and editor at Pew Research Center who focuses on Hispanics, immigration and demographic trends, about what’s behind the increase, and what the impact has been.

Guest

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