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Japanese Train Breaks Speed Record, Again

The Maglev (magnetic levitation) train speeds during a test run on the experimental track in Tsuru, 100km west of Tokyo, on May 11, 2010.  (Toru Yamanaka/AFP/Getty Images)
The Maglev (magnetic levitation) train speeds during a test run on the experimental track in Tsuru, 100km west of Tokyo, on May 11, 2010. (Toru Yamanaka/AFP/Getty Images)

A Japanese maglev that’s already the fastest passenger train in the world, has broken its own speed record.

Earlier this week, it hit a speed of 375 miles per hour on a test run near Mount Fugi, surpassing its previous record of 361 miles per hour.

Japan’s high-speed rail services are among the most advanced in the world, with hundreds of trains running each day with minimal delays.

However, unlike regular shinkansen or “bullet trains” that run on steel rails, magnetic levitation trains hover above rails, suspended by powerful magnets.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks to the BBC’s Rupert Wingfield Hayes, who is in Tokyo, about the new record and these Japanese speed demons.

  • Read more via BBC News
  • Note: This BBC interview can be heard in the Here & Now podcast or with the WBUR app.

    Guest

  • Rupert Wingfield-Hayes, Tokyo correspondent for the BBC. He tweets @wingcommander1.
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