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Oakland Police Turn Corner On History Of Violence

Protesters block an entrance to the Oakland police department headquarters during a demonstration over recent grand jury decisions in police-involved deaths on December 15, 2014 in Oakland, California. Over 200 hundred protesters blocked entrances to the Oakland police department and adjacent streets during a demonstration against recent grand jury decisions in New York and Missouri to not charge white police officers with the deaths of black men. Dozens were arrested. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Protesters block an entrance to the Oakland police department headquarters during a demonstration over recent grand jury decisions in police-involved deaths on December 15, 2014 in Oakland, California. Over 200 hundred protesters blocked entrances to the Oakland police department and adjacent streets during a demonstration against recent grand jury decisions in New York and Missouri to not charge white police officers with the deaths of black men. Dozens were arrested. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Oakland, California’s police department has long had a reputation as one of America’s most violent, but the OPD is attempting to create a new era of peace.

The department gained notoriety for a series of beatings and false arrests in the early 2000s, and for its brutal response to the 2011 Occupy protests. But this winter, mass demonstrations for Michael Brown and Eric Garner were met by the OPD with a surprising level of restraint.

A new mayor, police chief and the extended usage of lapel cameras have improved relations between the police and Oakland citizens. Attorney Jim Chanin speaks with Here & Now’s Robin Young how the department is becoming less violent.

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