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Millions March In Unity, Defiance After Attacks In Paris

French President Francois Hollande takes part with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Prime Minister Manuel Valls, Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, Swiss President Simonetta Sommaruga, Malian President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita and the former French president's wife Carla Bruni-Sarkozy, in a "Marche Republicaine" unity rally in Paris on January 11, 2015 in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists. (Patrick Kovarik/AFP/Getty Images)
French President Francois Hollande takes part with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Prime Minister Manuel Valls, Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, Swiss President Simonetta Sommaruga, Malian President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita and the former French president's wife Carla Bruni-Sarkozy, in a "Marche Republicaine" unity rally in Paris on January 11, 2015 in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists. (Patrick Kovarik/AFP/Getty Images)

The French government today ordered more than 10,000 soldiers and police into the streets to protect “sensitive sites” and Jewish schools, after last week’s attacks at a satirical newspaper and a kosher supermarket that left 17 people dead.

The three gunmen in those attacks were also killed last week, but French officials say the threat is still present, and that there may still be other accomplices at large.

Across France on Sunday, more than 3 million people took to the streets in a show of unity and defiance in the wake of the attacks. More than a million marched in Paris, including at least 40 world leaders, in the largest demonstration in the country’s history.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks to Annick Cojean, a reporter at the French newspaper Le Monde, about the march, the mood in France and the French government’s response to the attacks.

Guest

  • Annick Cojean, reporter at Le Monde, and president of Le Prix Albert Londres (the Albert Londres Prize), the biggest journalism prize in France. She tweets @AnnickCojean.

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