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Remembering Victims Of Fort Hood Shooter

ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

Last night, military personnel fanned out across the country to tell families about loved ones who were murdered.

MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

In Kiel, Wis., they arrived at 2 in the morning at the home of the Kruegers. Twenty-nine-year-old Sgt. Amy Krueger is among the dead. Her mother, Jeri Krueger(ph), told local media that Amy had enlisted soon after 9/11. She said she told Amy she couldn't take on bin Laden by herself. Her straight-talking daughter replied, watch me.

SIEGEL: Aaron Nemelka was a 19-year-old from West Jordan, Utah. As a child, he was a Cub Scout. Then he became a Boy Scout and an Eagle Scout. He joined the military just over a year ago. His uncle told local media that Nemelka said he was convinced that the Army was a good route to take in his life.

NORRIS: Francheska Velez was 21. She had just returned from a tour of duty in Iraq. She was due to be temporarily released from the military in a few weeks because she was pregnant.

SIEGEL: And 23-year-old Kham Xiong was from St. Paul, Minn. His wife says, yesterday he was waiting in line for a physical. She had just texted him to come home for lunch and he replied no, I'll stay. It's almost my turn.

NORRIS: These are just some of the 13 victims of yesterday's attack at Fort Hood, Texas. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by an NPR contractor. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

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