Prison and Justice Reporting

An ongoing series of stories on New Hampshire's criminal justice system, with a focus on the experience of those people moving through the state's corrections system. 

Visit N.H. Bar Foundation at nhbarfoundation.org.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Last year, 29 year old Robert Wilson was accused of a felony-level crime and faced the possibility of three and a half to seven years in prison. On Monday, after representing himself “pro se," the jury found him not guilty. 

Generally speaking, this doesn’t happen. Litigants represent themselves frequently in civil court, but rarely do criminal defendants argue by themselves before a jury. Wilson had even refused stand-by council.

Laws limiting where sex-offenders can live have been used in many towns and states aimed at protecting vulnerable populations, especially children. But a growing chorus of critics from police to civil rights attorneys argues these laws are unconstitutional and even counterproductive. We'll look at the options that communities have in dealing with this sensitive issue.

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New Hampshire Debates Body Cameras For Police

Feb 18, 2015
West Midlands Police / Flickr/CC

The national conversation over police use of force sparked by the deaths of unarmed suspects in Ferguson and New York City has been marked by unrest and divisive politics. But in the midst of this polarized debate, there is one change that nearly everyone agrees on: the need for more body cameras worn by police officers. Before the new technology is widely adopted though, questions of privacy, effectiveness, and cost will have to be addressed.

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