Workforce

Taylor Quimby

About a mile from downtown North Conway is a house. A sign out front says, “Residents Only.” An old silver camping trailer sits off to one side, half buried by tall grass and weeds. A half-dozen bikes are parked in the driveway.

Inside, it’s dark and smells strongly of mildew.

Fernando, who is just about to turn 21, is leaning forward, his elbows on his knees. He and four others sit around a coffee table, laughing awkwardly about the radio reporter who knocked on their door just a few minutes ago.

Robert Garrova for NHPR

Many seasonal businesses in New Hampshire take advantage of temporary worker visas to fill jobs. Now that the busy summer season is here, companies are saying there aren't enough of what are called H-2B visas to go around.

The visas allow international workers to fill non-agriculture jobs like openings for restaurant servers and landscaping workers. The national cap is set at 66,000, though the Department of Homeland Security has the authority to add an additional 69,000.

Courtesy Stay Work Play

A new survey of New Hampshire's younger residents seeks to understand what attracts -- and what deters -- this age group from sticking with the Granite State.

 

Researchers polled 420 people between the ages of 20 and 40. Only 19 percent of respondents said they definitely would not leave the state in the next two years and lack of affordable housing was a key concern.

 

Addiction in the Workplace

Feb 11, 2018
Pexels

In the midst of a drug crisis, New Hampshire is also dealing with a severe labor shortage.  So now, some employers and the state hope to creatively address where the two overlap, promoting so-called "recovery friendly workplaces".  We look at the practical, legal, and financial aspects of this. 

A group of education and economic development officials are discussing how to meet New Hampshire's workforce demands.

The group met in Bedford on Wednesday at a forum on the future of the state’s workforce. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Taylor Caswell, the commissioner of the Department of Business and Economic Affairs who attended the forum.

(Editor's note: this transcript has been edited lightly for clarity.)

A recent nationwide survey of supervisors finds that many businesses are not taking full advantage of resources available to train and employ those with disabilities. We'll look at the results of this survey, employment trends for adults with disabilities both nationally and in New Hampshire, and how employers can (and why they should) take advantage of this workforce. 


NHPR Flickr

One leading economist says the Granite State is "getting its groove back," with GDP growth up three percent in twenty sixteen. Also, the gig economy, including freelance and contract work, gains traction here, and job prospects widen for the state's aging workforce.


NHPR/Hannah McCarthy

A proposal to establish a paid family and medical leave insurance program had its first hearing Wednesday at the State House. The idea has been in the works for a while, but some advocates think New Hampshire is finally primed for the idea.

Todd Bookman for NHPR

The term “apprentice” may conjure up thoughts of reality television and a certain President-elect, but actual apprenticeships--where workers learn skills on the job--are on the rise nationally. And in New Hampshire's health care industry, apprentices are being used as a way to fill a gap in the workforce.

Ryan Caron King | NENC

It’s hard to avoid the hand-wringing about aging demographics in New England these days. The region's six states have the six lowest birth rates in the country. Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont have the oldest populations in the country, and Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts aren't far behind.

New unemployment figures came out Tuesday and at 2.8%, New Hampshire's rate remains the lowest in the nation. On paper, that may sound like a very good thing: nearly everyone who wants a job has one. But if you are an employer trying to fill a vacancy or a company trying to expand, these can be frustrating times.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire lawmakers Friday declined to move forward with a workforce development program championed by Gov. Maggie Hassan. The initiative, which was scheduled to start last month, would use unspent federal money to provide job training for welfare recipients.

Wendy Nelson / Flickr/CC

We're talking with millennials from the state for an update on whether and why more young adults are leaving the New Hampshire than coming to it, and what it means for the economy.

  This program was originally broadcast on 3/10/16.

  

Sara Plourde / NHPR

As New Hampshire tries to address an epidemic of opiate abuse, leaders in the state often focus on increasing the number of treatment beds and programs. But many in the state say staffing those programs may be much harder than building them.

Addiction treatment programs have been facing staffing shortages across the country for many years. In New Hampshire, things are particularly bad.