wildlife

The Eastern grey squirrel is a ubiquitous rodent in our area, and increasingly this fall, roadkill. We take them for granted; they've become a frequent topic of conversation mostly due to the notable number of carcasses on the roads. We take a moment to learn about the little creature we live in close proximity to, and find out why they are so plentiful this year and how they fit into the natural world and our environment.

Later in the hour, we get an update on the state's fight to protect the ash tree against the Emerald Ash Borer.

Courtesy of New Hampshire Audubon

If you’ve been noticing a lot of dead squirrels on the roads recently, you’re not alone.

New Hampshire has seen a bumper crop of acorns and pine cones in recent years, a key food source for the animals.

 

A New Hampshire legislative committee said Friday that wildlife officials must gather more public comment on a proposal to expand the trapping rules for snowshoe hares.

The wild rabbits are later released by sporting clubs to be chased by hunting dogs for training purposes and competitive field trials. The proposal would increase the number of permits allowing people to trap the rabbits from six to 10, and extend the season for capturing. The current rule has been in place since 2007.

Courtesy of Chad Witko

Back in January, NHPR ran a story about Kevin, a sandhill crane who was melting hearts in the town of Rollinsford. Despite a leg injury and freezing temperatures, the bird was living its best life in this small town.

With the warmer weather and longer days, Kevin now appears to have flown the coop, leaving behind many a brokenhearted resident.

Courtesy Sarah Lindberg

New Hampshire wildlife officials have a new plan for a bear in Hanover that gave local and state officials the run-around last year.   

Moose Hunt Lottery Opens in New Hampshire

Jan 29, 2018
USFWS David Govtaski

  The moose hunt lottery is now open in New Hampshire.

The 2018 applications must be postmarked or submitted online by midnight on May 25, or delivered to the licensing office at the Fish and Game Department headquarters in Concord before 4 p.m. that day.

Winners will be selected through a computerized random drawing on June 15.

Pixabay

If you see a family of turkeys crossing the road, the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department would like to know. As the summer winds down and young turkeys begin to mature, wildlife officials are reminding residents about their annual citizen science turkey count.

Paul Scott via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/8bUHaa

You may have seen ads posted on your community cork board for something called citizen science. It’s a trend in scientific research that allows regular people to help out with professional-grade studies by reporting data about their own backyards.

Tuesday at 6pm in the Draft Sports Bar in Concord, Concord Monitor columnist David Brooks will host the Science Café. He and a panel of scientists will talk about this innovative approach to research, and he spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello for a preview.

What exactly is citizen science?

NHPR

Normandeau's agency's been swamped by a rising number of hikers needing rescue. We'll talk about that, also continued funding struggles, controversy over gun politics, and Fish and Game's starring role in the TV show "North Woods Law: New Hampshire" on Animal Planet. 


Ross Boyd

Something Wild recently visited Maria Colby, director of Wings of the Dawn Wildlife Rehabilitation Center in Henniker.

Peter Roome via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/ckY7tj

Millennials are less religious than their predecessors—so what does that mean for the future of the abortion issue? On today’s show, the growing number of young pro-life activists who are—or call themselves—secular feminists: the new generation of pro-life activists who are separating themselves from the GOP, and the religious right.

Plus, a new 10-Minute Writer's Workshop with Jodi Picoult. Her newest book carries on her tradition of tackling tough subjects with an ensemble of narrators, and this time, it's race. 

Beavers have been busy this summer, building dams and creating wetlands—in places they're not always welcome. Commercial trappers are getting more calls to remove beavers from neighborhoods this season, and that's due to a drop in international fur prices. When prices for fur drop overseas, the number of beavers in New Hampshire goes up.

Anton Kaska unfolds a beaver trap and wedges it into the swampy ground in a marsh in a Bedford neighborhood. It's designed to catch the beaver around the shoulders and neck.

Bryan Hanson / Morguefile

The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation announced a million dollars in grants Tuesday to restore New Hampshire’s forest and fish habitat.

Eight organizations received funding to restore wildlife habitat in New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, and Maine. Collectively, the groups will open nearly 200 miles of streams for fish passage and improve habitat for the New England Cottontail, American woodcock, and golden-winged warblers.

Eversource, New Hampshire’s largest electric utility, is donating the bulk of the funding.

N.H.'s New Ten-Year Action Wildlife Plan

Dec 3, 2015
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services / Flickr/CC

The state's new ten-year wildlife action plan was announced last month, laying out priorities for New Hampshire's natural resources and critters. We'll look into what the plan entails, and how its used in towns weighing conservation against other considerations.

Guests:

Bow Police via Facebook

An emu famous for running wild through New Hampshire for more than a week has been reunited with its owner and returned home to Vermont, perhaps after recognizing the man's jacket.

The Concord Monitor reports Kermit Blackwood figured it was a long shot that the emu loose in New Hampshire was his bird, Beatrice.

It wasn't until the Townshend, Vermont, resident traveled roughly 80 miles to the Henniker-based nonprofit Wings of the Dawn when he knew for sure.

jjjj56cp via flickr Creative Commons

The bird world quiets down by late summer - but not the American goldfinch, one of the most common backyard birds. September brings the chatter of young goldfinches as they follow their male parent. They beg noisily, perched with head thrown back and trembling wings.

Most songbirds switch their diet to high-protein insects when feeding their young, and they nest earlier when insects are most bountiful. For example, chickadees that keep bird-feeders busy in winter disappear in summer as they forage for insects not birdseed.

www.seacoastsciencecenter.org

New Hampshire wildlife officials are reminding residents that picking up young creatures is both illegal and potentially harmful.

Ashley Stokes heads the Marine Mammal Rescue program for the Seacoast Science Center in Rye. She says only those with special permits can care for wildlife, because improper care can harm or kill wildlife. But some individuals who encounter young harbor seals alone on New Hampshire beaches try to help anyway.

Fish And Game's Glenn Normandeau

May 11, 2015
Kevin Micalizzi / Flickr/CC

Fish and Game Executive Director joins us to discuss his agency's mission, its 150th anniversary, and its wildlife management planning process - including decisions around hunting permits and fishing catch limits.

Why Human Feeding Can Hurt Deer

Mar 24, 2015
Ben Hudson via Society for Protection of NH Forests

Last week, 12 deer were found dead in South Hampton. On Tuesday New Hampshire Fish and Game announced the cause of those deaths: feeding by humans.

Dan Bergeron is a deer project leader with New Hampshire Fish and Game. He joined All Things Considered with more on what happened.

 What were these deer fed, and why was that bad for them?

ForestWander.com

The "fisher cat": ferocious predator of house cats whose bloodcurdling screams pierce the dark of night. Facts about this one wildlife species have mutated a long way into fiction. For starters, fishers are members of the weasel family—not feline. Properly referred to, they're "fishers," not "fisher cats." 

The Battle To Save The Bats

Jan 27, 2015
Marek Stefunko / Flickr/CC

First the latest on impacts of the severe weather we’re seeing in the region, from roads to the power grid. Then, the battle to save the bats: we're talking with a UNH researcher about signs of resilience among bats, devastated by white-nose syndrome, and new findings about their immune systems that could lead to treatments for some human diseases.

GUESTS:

Logan Shannon / NHPR

Not so long ago, most parents had a pretty simple stance on pot : just say no. But legalization has made the conversation a lot more complicated. On today’s show: how to talk to your kids about marijuana.

Plus, a look at the strange subculture behind the Oxford dictionary’s 2014 word of the year: vape. More on an e-cigarette industry that’s projected to reach 10 billion dollars in the next 3 years.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

New Hampshire Fish and Game Department officers and a wildlife rehabilitator have nursed a juvenile bald eagle back to health.

The healthy bird was released in Squam Lake's Long Island last week, near its nest.

The Eagle-Tribune reports a conservation officer rescued the bird in August. It had a broken leg, possibly caused by falling out of the nest or having a rough landing while learning to fly.

Hadley Paul Garland via Flickr/CC http://ow.ly/C7DIV

Humans can't see ultraviolet light - but many types of wildlife can. And a man in Nashua is researching whether that difference may help humans and wildlife better co-exist in the future.

David Brooks writes the weekly GraniteGeek science column for the Nashua Telegraph and Granite Geek.org.

Something Wild: Goldfinches, The Late Nesters

Sep 12, 2014
jjjj56cp via flickr Creative Commons

The bird world quiets down by late summer - but not the American goldfinch, one of the most common backyard birds. September brings the chatter of young goldfinches as they follow their male parent. They beg noisily, perched with head thrown back and trembling wings.

Most songbirds switch their diet to high-protein insects when feeding their young, and they nest earlier when insects are most bountiful. For example, chickadees that keep bird-feeders busy in winter disappear in summer as they forage for insects not birdseed.

Saving The World's Wild Cats

Aug 7, 2014
Jens Hauser / Flickr/CC

Although at the top of the food chain, “apex predators" such as tigers, jaguars, and mountain lions face threats as varied as poachers, habitat destruction, and climate change. We’ll sit down with a leading expert to talk about this, how his efforts tie into a broader conservation movement, and the big cats in our own backyards.

GUEST:

via Griffins Guide

DNA analysis of the endangered New England cottontail shows that power line rights of way, railroad edges and roadsides may help support their diminishing habitat.

The small, brown rabbit has been declining in the region for decades. Development and natural forest growth have cut into the dense patches of shrubs and brush that it prefers.

Saturday Brings 'The Great American Backyard Camp-Out'

Jun 28, 2014
Thirteen of clubs via Flickr CC

Few things are as nostalgic for many Americans as the idea of sitting around a campfire, roasting marshmallows, and looking for constellations or listening to scary stories. It’s these memories that the National Wildlife Federation hopes to rekindle with the Great American Backyard Camp-Out on Saturday, June 28.

Steve Wall

Initial coverage by Sam Evans-Brown here.

 A second reward of up to $5,000 is being offered for information leading to an arrest and conviction in two recent loon shootings in New Hampshire.

The reward is being offered through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. An initial reward of $5,000 was offered by The Humane Society of the United States and The Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust.

Alexandra MacKenzie via flickr Creative Commons

Move over robins; red-winged blackbirds are the real harbingers of spring.

The male’s scratchy “oak-a-lee” songs are heard when the world is still blanketed with snow and maple sap is just beginning to flow. Males return north well before females, and the early bird does get the worm. In this case the metaphorical worm is prime breeding territory.

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