whales

New England Aquarium

Another minke whale has been found dead on the New England coast.

The carcass found in Massachusetts on Tuesday marks 26 deaths of what regulators call an "unusual mortality event" for minke whales.

They're not considered endangered. But like all whales, they are a protected species in American waters.

AP

A viral video of a whale carcass falling from a front-loader and dumpster to the pavement in Rye this week highlights what's being called an "exceptional die-off" of Minke Whales off the coast of Massachusetts and New Hampshire.

New England Aquarium spokesman Tony LaCasse says scientists do not yet know the source of these dead whales.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 21, 2018

Sep 21, 2018

We get an update on reform efforts at the Manchester VA. A Hampton couple is charged with a felony for allegedly voting in New Hampshire and Massachusetts in 2016. N.H. Senate Democrats have outlined the agenda they will pursue if they gain a majority in the Statehouse. And a dead whale washes up on on Jenness Beach in Rye, offering a chance to learn about the mammals, but moving it proves a challenge.

Blue Ocean Society

A fishing crew from Massachusetts is accused of harassing a humpback whale off Rye Harbor Thursday. A federal investigation could follow.

Dianna Schulte of the Blue Ocean Society was whale-watching in the area Thursday when she says she saw the Gloucester-based vessel Western Wave use its purse seine net to encircle a humpback whale and the herring she was eating.

The Leviathan In Our Midst: Whales Off N.H.'s Coast

Aug 14, 2018
NOAA

Whale-watching is a popular activity off New Hampshire's coast, but what do we really know about these huge marine mammals?  We hear from a paleobiologist who's written a new book "Spying On Whales: The Past, Present, and Future of Earth's Most Awesome Creatures," about the evolutionary history of whales. We also look at the ecological success of the humpback whale, and consider the North Atlantic right whale, teetering on the edge of extinction.  And we look at whale preservation efforts made by the lobster and fishing industry.

 

Biologists still don't know what killed a young humpback whale that washed ashore in New Hampshire.

The 45-foot-long whale, named Snow Plow, was discovered June 26 by fishermen who first spotted its corpse floating 20 miles off the shore.

Snow Plow was one of hundreds of whales that scientists had been tracking for years. She's part of several pods that return to the Gulf of Maine to feed every summer.

 

Scientists conducting a necropsy of a dead whale that washed up in Rye Monday say they have yet to find any indication of what killed the 18-year-old humpback. They found no sign of a hematoma, which would have indicated that the whale had been struck by a ship, but they would continue to take tissue samples to see if any disease can be detected.

julierohloff via Flickr Creative Commons

With the weather warming up across New England, people are heading for the coast. Today Word of Mouth hits the high seas. First we'll ponder the unfathomable push and pull of the open ocean. Then, we’ll speak to an artist who created the world’s first submerged sculpture park, his underwater gallery not only attracts art-lovers, but serves as an artificial reef. Plus, farmed fish now exceeds beef production. Have fish farmers learned from the mistakes of the meat industry?

Kurk Dorsey's "Whales & Nations"

Mar 19, 2014
Univ of Washington Press

The new book "Whales and Nations" by UNH professor Kurkpatrick Dorsey explores the history of international conservation efforts through the lens of the commercial whaling industry. We’ll talk with him about the whaling in the 20th century and why international diplomacy failed to regulate commercial whaling.

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