Weather

NHPR File

In New Hampshire, it can be a balmy 52 and sunny one day and a "bomb cyclone" of snow and wind the next. It's what you grow to expect as a New Englander. But we still depend on the forecast to make our plans -- and rush to the grocery stores.

So how does that work in a state without its own weather service office?

Ice accumulating on tree limbs and utility wires from today's rain and sleet has caused a few thousand power outages in New Hampshire.

As of Tuesday at 6 p.m., there are almost 10,000 customers without electricity.

Local and state plow crews continue to treat and monitor roads for slick travel conditions.

Line crews are tackling some of the toughest trouble-spots as night fell. The estimated outages, by utility (click the links to see the respective outages by town/utility):

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

The winter storm that began overnight will result in 3- to 6- inches of snow accumulation for most of New Hampshire before leaving the region by early evening.

Gov. Chris Sununu says the state Emergency Operations Center opened at 6 a.m. to monitor the impact on this morning's commute. Major highways are posted 45 mph top speed.

A flood watch is in effect for a large part of New Hampshire on Friday and Saturday, as the forecast calls for possible heavy rain at times, with precipitation turning to sleet and a wintry mix.

The National Weather Service has issued a slew of warnings and advisories for the Granite State. Some regions have multiple advisories. Concord, for example, has the following:

FILE

New Hampshire officials are warning residents to take some precautions as extreme cold is replaced by rain.

Mount Washington Observatory

The Mount Washington Observatory reported early Saturday that the summit tied for second-coldest place on earth, at a brisk -36 degrees Fahrenheit.

It was just 2 degrees from the coldest locations, Yakutsk, Russia, and Eureka, Nunavut, which recorded -38, according to the weather observer.

At 6,288 feet, Mount Washington is "home of the world's worst weather," as it is celebrated by the observatory, a non-profit organization.

Continuing sub-freezing temperatures are putting a strain on plumbers across New Hampshire.

Keith Godbout runs a plumbing business in Bow. He said he simply can’t keep up with the calls.

“This is the worst I’ve seen it since I’ve been in business for 23 years,” he said.

It’s not just the arctic temperatures, he added, but the fact that it’s been such a prolonged period of consistent cold. Godbout said he started hearing from a wave of mobile home residents last Tuesday, but that's now expanded to include more modern homes and older farmhouses.

NHPR on Instagram

The New Hampshire Department of Transportation says advisory speeds on Interestate 93 have been reduced to 45 mph between Exit 20 and Exit 32 due to snow showers and wintry conditions.

Crews are out treating roads in central and northern New Hampshire.

According to the National Weather Service, snow could accumulate to less than one inch, with showers expected to taper off later this evening.

N.H. Emergency Chief: Storm Severity Was Surprising

Nov 6, 2017
Chris Jensen Photo

In addition to the high winds and heavy rain of last week's storm, several other factors contributed to the fourth largest power outage in state history -- with a price tag in the millions, and counting. That's according to Perry Plummer, director of the state Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management.

Jason Moon/NHPR

  Damage estimates from last week’s severe storm continue to rise and appear likely to qualify for a presidential major disaster declaration.

Perry Plummer, director of the New Hampshire Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management, said Monday on The Exchange that the state’s damage tally is currently at $13.5 million.

NH DOT

With damage caused by Hurricane Harvey still being tallied and Hurricane Irma set to make landfall, New Hampshire officials are taking stock of the state's preparedness in what could prove to be a record-breaking year for major weather events in the United States.

Several costly natural disasters have hit New Hampshire in recent years, such as the “Mother’s Day Flood,” which caused more than $25 million in damage.

New Hampshire is unlikely to bear the direct brunt of a storm like Hurricane Harvey, but the state has experienced its share of disasters, from historic flooding to a tornado that killed a Northwood woman in 2008.

It’s those sudden or “no-notice” storms that keep Perry Plummer, director of New Hampshire Homeland Security and Emergency Management, on his guard. He wishes more people were prepared for major storms.

“We as citizens are under-prepared for disasters in this country,” Plummer said. “It’s a wake-up call for everybody.”

Updated at 2:15 a.m. ET Wednesday:

The most powerful Atlantic Ocean hurricane in recorded history made its first landfall in Northeast Caribbean islands. The eye passed over Barbuda around 1:47 a.m, according to the National Weather Service.

Updated at 11:10 p.m. ET

"Hurricane Irma has intensified into an extremely dangerous Category 5 hurricane," the National Hurricane Center says, citing the latest data from NOAA and Air Force hurricane hunter aircraft.

Kellan

A wetter than average April, combined with a snowier than average winter, has produced no shortage of New England’s least marketable terrain - mud.

We at NHPR were curious if well-learned meteorologists, the men and women who watch the weather more closely than any of us, would still technically consider this Mud Season, even though we are already firmly into May.

Turns out, nope.

Courtesy of Emerson Aviation

Forget what the calendar says: For plenty New Hampshire residents, a surer sign of the start of spring is the annual “ice out” declaration on Lake Winnipesaukee. That's the day when the M/S Mount Washington can safely travel to all four of her ports without getting snared in ice along the way.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Parts of New England, including New Hampshire, are expected to receive at least a foot of snow thanks in part to something known as a weather bomb, or, for the logophiles out there, “bombogenesis.” Why is this storm considered “bombogenesis”? For that answer, we turn to Mark Breen. He’s a meteorologist at the Fairbanks Museum in St. Johnsbury, Vermont. He spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello.

What is bombogenesis?

I think that’s a really cool catchphrase what is probably a more boring title. It’s known as “explosive cyclogenesis.”

AMS Archives / Flickr/CC

A new book by Stephen Long describes how this giant storm transformed the New England landscape and seared itself into the memory of its people.  We’ll delve into just how big it was, the wide-ranging impacts, including how the hurricane created public works projects and developed new thinking around forestry. We'll also talk about preparation for the next inevitable great storm.

  This program was originally broadcast on 4/11/16.

Flikr Creative Commons / blmurch

Update Sunday 7/24 11:30pm: New Hampshire electric utilities say they've restored power to nearly all of the homes and businesses who lost electricity during Saturday's storm.

Qualsiasi/flickr

Today’s topic is thunderstorms. Summer in NH brings those triple H days – hazy, hot, and humid! On days like those there’s nothing more welcome than the arrival of a late-afternoon thunderstorm, leaving in its wake cool, refreshing air, scrubbed clean of haze and pollution.

KentonNgo via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/ZoYEH

  The mild March weather likely means an early start to allergy season.

The state Department of Transportation says it’s prepared for the first statewide winter storm of the season.

Sean Hurley

  Faced with the startling sight of bare pavement on the day after Christmas, the Mount Washington Auto Road is open for guided tours. 

Now that forecasters expect Hurricane Joaquin to pass well east of the state, New Hampshire utilities are holding off on deploying emergency work crews.

Alec O’Meara of Unitil says the company has been planning for the storm since Monday. He says, given that a large amount of the eastern seaboard was believed to be in Joaquin’s path, power companies were "really trying to figure out exactly where the best place for all those crews to be allocated. Thankfully it was more of an intellectual process, and it appears all will be spared - at least in the continental United States."

Snow Plow
Nedra / Flickr Creative Commons

We’re in for another long, cold, snowy winter in New Hampshire this year – at least according to the Old Farmer’s Almanac and publications like it.

But what do scientists make of these kinds of predictions?

The Merge Show

Aug 6, 2015

The English language is awash in portmanteaus, words or sounds that merge together to create something new. Spoon and fork combine to make spork, breakfast and lunch join to create brunch. Merging words, sounds or celebrity names is easy. Other types of mergers? Not so much.  Today’s show is all about what happens when two things become one - and from traffic lanes, to company buy-outs, to organ transplants, we’ll discover that merging is anything but simple.

Heavy Rain, Winds Cause Outages In New Hampshire

Jun 28, 2015
Courtesy Laconia Police Department

Update 9:29 am:  Unitil now says fewer than of its 200 customers are without power. 

New Hampshire power companies say they’re working to restore electricity during Sunday's heavy rain.

Eversource Energy, the state’s largest utility, reported more than 3,000 homes and businesses lost power during the morning, and that crews had begun working to restore electricity.

Qualsiasi/flickr

 

A strong storm has taken down trees and power lines in southern New Hampshire and a lightning strike is believed to be the cause of a house fire in Peterborough.

WMUR-TV reports police had to block off a neighborhood in Salem after trees fell on roofs, lawns and cars. Branches and power lines were in the streets Thursday.

No injuries were reported.

The fire in Peterborough started in a basement Thursday afternoon and was put out quickly. No one was hurt.

Rain Could Lower Risk Of Brush Fires In New Hampshire

May 11, 2015
Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

The return of rainy weather to New Hampshire may start to reduce the risk of brush fires.

Unusually dry conditions last week led to brush fires in more than a half-dozen towns and cities in southern New Hampshire.

Warm Weather To Start The Week In New Hampshire

May 4, 2015
Brady Carlson / NHPR

  Forecasters say Monday will likely bring New Hampshire its warmest temperatures of the year so far.

Meteorologist Rob St. Pierre of Hometown Forecast Services says an area of high pressure system has brought higher temperatures to the state, after several weeks of cooler weather:

“We had an upper level low sitting off to the east of Maine, and that was spinning in all the clouds. We had a northerly flow at the time, so that’s why our temperatures had a hard time getting out of the 40’s and low 50’s.”

BillandKent via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/M6KDm

The traditional declaration of ice out on Lake Winnipesaukee came around the usual time in 2015, even after an unusually cold and snowy winter.

Pages