Summer

Courtesy Mark Yokoyama via Flickr/Creative Commons

Something Wild fan, Michael Carrier, wrote in recently, he said “If possible could you do a program about identifying some of the more common sounds you hear at dusk or night in New Hampshire.”

Yeah, we can do that.

So a typical evening scene in Anytown, New Hampshire is a symphony of sound. A screen door slams in the distance…a jake brake startles the neighbor’s dog…the weekend warrior fires up her motorcycle…But as the evening settles in and human sounds fade away we can better hear the natural world.

Some kids spend their summers swimming and paddling. Others hammering and drilling.

 

Bella and Kaylee are two of the leaders of Girls at Work. It’s a program for girls based in Manchester that teaches girls how to build everything from shelves to picnic tables using power tools.

 

2018 Summer Movie Show

Jul 17, 2018
Flickr, Eman Rahman

From action-packed thrillers and family-friendly animation, to heart-warming documentaries and the latest installments in several superhero franchises, summer 2018 has had a diverse movie lineup. We discuss the summer's movies so far: what we loved, what we hated, and what we think you should see. After that, we'll look ahead to the rest of the summer, and let you know what upcoming movies you won't want to miss. 

N.H. Visitors to Spend $155M Over Fourth of July Holiday

Jul 1, 2018
Martin Abbott / Flickr CC

 

New Hampshire tourism officials estimate more than a million out-of-state visitors are expected to spend in excess of $155 million over the Fourth of July holiday period in the state.

The period from Friday, June 29, through Sunday, July 8, kicks off New Hampshire's busiest travel season.

The majority of visitors will be coming from New England and the Middle Atlantic states.

Courtesy Heidi Asbjornsen

The specter of drought is often raised in these early days of summer. And for good reason, though water levels have returned to normal around the New Hampshire, state officials are still warning residents to remain cautious after last summer drought. And while we often fret about the health of our lawns and our gardens, Dave (from the Forest Society) wanted to address drought resistance among his favorite species, trees.

 

US Dept of Agriculture

As the school year winds down, many parents are having to "wind up," making plans to care for, and entertain, their children during the long weeks of vacation.  We talk with two Granite State parents, who write about parenting, about navigating the sometimes steep price of summer.

Courtesy of St. Paul's School's Website

Long before the #MeToo movement took down politicians, movie moguls and powerful media personalities, St. Paul’s School in Concord was grappling with its own history of sexual misconduct.

Courtesy dimitrisokolenko via Creative Commons.

Labor Day weekend is often summer’s last hurrah – or at least our last chance to participate in those uniquely summer pastimes. So we thought we’d go out with some sun, surf and a nice breeze by exploring another of New Hampshire’s Wild Neighborhoods. And once again we take a tour of great place to visit, but a hard place to eke out a living.

Courtesy of Doug Flamino

Each August, the town of Hancock, N.H., does what every good town should do: it celebrates itself. Hancock’s Old Home Days are a chance for residents to relish the quaintness of their community.

Along with a parade, talent show, 5K race and ice cream social, there is also a high-spirited water ballet performance by a group of local women. They’re called the Synchro Sisters...and they have a secret.

(Editor’s note: we highly recommend listening to this story.)

Courtesy Mark Yokoyama via Flickr/Creative Commons

Something Wild fan, Michael Carrier, wrote in recently, he said “If possible could you do a program about identifying some of the more common sounds you hear at dusk or night in New Hampshire.”

Yeah, we can do that.

  

So a typical evening scene in Anytown, New Hampshire is a symphony of sound. A screen door slams in the distance…a jake brake startles the neighbor’s dog…the weekend warrior fires up her motorcycle…But as the evening settles in and human sounds fade away we can better hear the natural world.

7.25.17: Nerdette's Summer Homework Special

Jul 25, 2017
Nathan Oakley via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/fHEvdT

On today's show, we're tuning into WBEZ's Nerdette, hosted by Tricia Bobeda and Greta Johnsen! In this Summer Homework Special, we’ll get homework assignments from astrophysicists, writers, sex therapists, and even Tom Hanks.

Skin Cancer: The Latest Research, News, And Advice

Jul 17, 2017
Pixabay.com

New England is not known for its sunny skies, but it is known for high rates of skin cancer. Why are Granite Staters highly vulnerable to this disease, including the most virulent type, melanoma? We'll look at this, and at why there's cause for optimism, particularly when it comes to prevention and a promising treatment, immunotherapy.

This show originally aired on June 1, 2017. 

Courtesy Heidi Asbjornsen

The specter of drought is often raised in these early days of summer. And for good reason, though water levels have returned to normal around the New Hampshire, state officials are still warning residents to remain cautious after last summer drought. And while we often fret about the health of our lawns and our gardens, Dave (from the Forest Society) wanted to address drought resistance among his favorite species, trees.

Olja Antic; Flickr

A female superhero, intergalactic travel, a beach-body reboot, and more - this year's summer film schedule is jam-packed with big action, but also some satisfying classic comedy and thought-provoking drama. We'll talk about the must-sees, and the maybe-avoids.


Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The sun is out—but ticks are too. The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services is reminding people to take precautions against getting bitten. 

The tiny parasites can be as small as a poppy seed and they like to hang out in tall grass or loose brush. “Ticks are out and biting," says state epidemiologist Benjamin Chan. "In fact, we tend to see tick bites start to go up in April and become more prominent in May, so now is a high-risk time where people can get bitten."

Onasill ~ Bill Badzo via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/84Dbc7

The BBC's list of the top 100 movies since 2000 included a lot of foreign and art house films, with hardly a blockbuster in the bunch. The internet peanut gallery was not pleased. Has anyone even seen these movies besides movie critics, they cried? Today, movie critic Ty Burr talks about the chasm between film buffs and mainstream movie goers.

Then, as we bid a fond farewell to August, it's time to catch up on worthwhile summer movies before the leaves  turn. The Hippo's Amy Diaz runs through a few you and the kids don't want to miss.

8.24.16: Best Summer Listens

Aug 24, 2016
Allison Marchant via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/4jZ1ad

So late August is just about the toughest time to produce a radio show, because just about everybody is on vacation  -  of course, that doesn't matter much for podcasts - these days with so much on-demand audio, our playlists are packed with great new shows, and fresh episodes from our long-time favorites. Since Virginia is off swimming in a lake somewhere, and all of the other newsmakers are off squeezing the last few drops out of summer, today we're going to do a summer playlist of staff podcast picks. 

Courtesy Mark Yokoyama via Flickr/Creative Commons

Something Wild fan, Michael Carrier, wrote in recently, he said “If possible could you do a program about identifying some of the more common sounds you hear at dusk or night in New Hampshire.”

Yeah, we can do that.

So a typical evening scene in Anytown, New Hampshire is a symphony of sound. A screen door slams in the distance…a jake brake startles the neighbor’s dog…the weekend warrior fires up her motorcycle…But as the evening settles in and human sounds fade away we can better hear the natural world.

Hannah McCarthy for NHPR

Most knew her as the “Shooting Gallery Lady.”

Elizabeth Moreau, a Hampton Beach icon, died of a stroke on Monday night after nearly forty years on the boardwalk. In the days since, there has been an outpouring of response on social media. People have flooded the Hampton Beach Facebook page with pictures and memories of Elizabeth and the gallery.

At the beginning of this year's summer season, Elizabeth and her husband, Robert, shared their story with NHPR.

Courtesy DES

To everything there is a season and this is the season when we go swimming and we spend a lot of time talking about Cyanobacteria. So what is it, exactly? Sonya Carlson is head of the Beach Inspection Program with the state Department of Environmental Services and gave us a primer on the micro-organism.

Happy Father's Day

Jun 17, 2016
http://gph.is/1sHPC2C

Justin Ennis via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/juNFgM

It feels like summer. Time to head to the coast, the lake, or local pool. The urge to jump into water may feel instinctive on a hot day, but swimming is a learned behavior for humans. Today, an historian says that by learning to swim a little, humans have learned to drown a lot.

Plus, Pulitzer-prize winning novelist Richard Russo joins me for the 10-Minute Writer's Workshop. He talks about shedding pretentiousness, learning humility, and why the hapless citizens in the decaying mill town of his youth keep coming up in novels like Nobody's Fool and Empire Falls.

Michael Bentley via Flickr

Every week here at Something Wild we encourage you to go outside.  It's easy to find the wild in New Hampshire, be it a walk on the beach, a hike in the woods or a quiet crepuscular kayak ride.  However there are things you need to be mindful of when you're out.  We've heard a lot about ticks but not so much about poison ivy.  

You've probably seen or come into contact with poison ivy at some point; the three waxy leaves with serrated edges.  You probably also know you should avoid it.  Don't touch touch the vine, don't touch the root.  You can get a rash from any part of the plant.

NHPR

We’re at an osprey nest in Tilton with Iain McLeod, director of Squam Lakes Natural Science Center. Our goal is recruiting another individual for Project OspreyTrack. He explains that Project OspreyTrack began in 2011, “to try to understand a little bit more about osprey migration and foraging.” 

André Karwath via flickr Creative Commons

Summertime ushers in a bevy of fresh fruit enjoy and in no time, a bevy of fruit flies. With a keen sense of smell, fruit flies hone in on a juicy cantaloupe or overripe bananas tossed on the compost pile. Although they're a pest in the kitchen, fruit flies have been a focus of research for over 100 years, and today there are hundreds of labs dedicated exclusively to studying them.

Pam Hunt; NH Audubon

We’re standing up to our shins in Turkey Pond, on a warm July morning with Pam Hunt, a biologist with New Hampshire Audubon who has spent the last five years organizing, in conjunction with NH Fish and Game, the New Hampshire Dragonfly Survey. Hunt trained about a hundred volunteers to gather data and help map the distribution of dragonflies across the state. 

Michael Bentley via Flickr

Every week here at Something Wild we encourage you to go outside.  It's easy to find the wild in New Hampshire, be it a walk on the beach, a hike in the woods or a quiet crepuscular kayak ride.  However there are things you need to be mindful of when you're out.  We've heard a lot about ticks but not so much about poison ivy.  

You've probably seen or come into contact with poison ivy at some point; the three waxy leaves with serrated edges.  You probably also know you should avoid it.  Don't touch touch the vine, don't touch the root.  You can get a rash from any part of the plant.

Brian Hoffman via flickr Creative Commons

If today's installment of Something Wild fell to my NH Audubon cohorts, it would be easy to feature our national symbol, the Bald Eagle--perfect for patriotic Fourth of July! Instead, "NH Forest Guy" wracks his brain to make a tree connection to our nation's birthday. All I could come up with is that bottle rockets are affixed to wooden sticks and that firecrackers and other pyrotechnics are constructed and packaged using cardboard and paper--all derived from tree. No trees? No fireworks!

NH Audubon

Those of you who keep a close eye on the Peregrine Falcon cam in Manchester, will be well acquainted with the saga these birds have undergone. If you're not, NH Audubon's Chris Martin recorded a quick recap last year.

Jason Moon / NHPR

We're checking in booksellers and a librarian for their picks of what to read this summer.

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