SCOTUS

Updated at 6:26 p.m. ET

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and the woman accusing him of sexual assault more than three decades ago, Christine Blasey Ford, will both testify publicly before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 24. The committee was supposed to vote on the nomination this Thursday but faced pressure after Ford went public with her allegation over the weekend.

Ford and Kavanaugh both agreed to testify under oath before the committee.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Both of New Hampshire's Democratic U.S. senators said Monday they will vote against Brett Kavanaugh as a U.S. Supreme Court justice.

Shaheen said the nominee is out of step on the scope of a president's executive power, women's right to abortions and pre-existing conditions under the Affordable Care Act.

She also said she's frustrated by the "lack of documentation" produced by Republicans and the nominee's "refusal to answer basic questions about his judicial record and philosophy." She said she believes Republicans are deliberately concealing his record.

Confirmation hearings are continuing for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

After a sometimes raucous day of opening statements on Tuesday, Kavanaugh is facing his first round of questioning from Senators on Wednesday.

Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee want to know about Kavanaugh's position on a range of issues including abortion, healthcare and presidential power.

The nominee also faces questions about his time working in the Bush administration and his time working under independent counsel Ken Starr.

Watch the hearing live:

JJBers via Flickr/Creative Commons

A major ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court last month means that states that impose a sales tax can now require businesses located outside of their borders to collect that tax and turn the money over. It’s a big deal for New Hampshire, one of the few states without a sales tax.

U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit

President Donald Trump has chosen Judge Brett Kavanaugh to replace retiring U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy.

Kavanaugh currently serves as a U.S. Circuit Judge on the D.C. Court of Appeals. He’s described as a conservative.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with New Hampshire's Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen about her thoughts on the president's pick.

Jason Moon for NHPR

This week’s Supreme Court ruling limiting the ability of public sector unions to collect "agency fees" from non-members has landed along predictably partisan lines in New Hampshire. 

File photo

Backers of Right to Work legislation in New Hampshire are praising Thursday’s ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court in the case of Janus v. AFSCME. In a 5-4 decision, the justices ruled that public sector unions cannot charge non-members for the costs of collective bargaining.

SCOTUS

A major U.S. Supreme Court ruling last week could force New Hampshire businesses to collect a sales tax on behalf of other states.

The ruling in the case of South Dakota v. Wafair overturned more than 50 years of legal precedent. The decision is seen as a blow to New Hampshire businesses, which say collecting a sales tax on behalf of other states is burdensome.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Taylor Caswell, a commissioner at the New Hampshire Department of Business and Economic Affairs, about how the state plans to respond.


A Review of Recent SCOTUS Rulings

Jun 24, 2018
wikipedia

It's been a busy few weeks at the U.S. Supreme Court. We'll focus on several recent decisions  addressing online business, digital privacy, religious freedom, and sports betting.  The online-sales ruling in particular has made big waves here in New Hampshire. 

SCOTUS

 

The Supreme Court on Monday struck down a federal law that bars gambling on football, basketball, baseball and other sports in most states, giving states the go-ahead to legalize betting on sports.

The Supreme Court ruled 6-3 to strike down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act. The 1992 law barred state-authorized sports gambling with some exceptions. It made Nevada the only state where a person could wager on the results of a single game.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

The United States Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday in a case with huge potential impact on New Hampshire businesses, as well as anyone who shops online.

The case essentially pits the 45 states that impose a sales tax against the handful that don’t, including the Granite State.

On Thursday, the State of New Hampshire filed a legal brief in the U.S. Supreme Court case South Dakota v. Wayfair, which is scheduled for oral arguments later this month.

The case could have huge ramifications for how businesses collect sales taxes when selling goods to customers across state lines.

The U.S. Supreme Court Cases To Watch This Fall

Oct 23, 2017
John Marino; Flickr

A new term at the U.S. Supreme Court opens with some long-standing debates.  The high court began its legal season on October 1st. Major issues include the drawing of political boundaries, called gerrymandering. Other cases address issues of digital privacy and religious freedom. 

NPR has a comprehensive discussion of many of these cases, found here


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The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of a limited version of President Trump's travel ban this week, saving broader consideration for the fall.  We cover the legal arguments and look at other high-profile high court cases this term, including First Amendment issues on trademarks and hate speech. 


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  Former New Hampshire Senator Kelly Ayotte says she's certain U.S. Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch will be confirmed, even if it means changing Senate rules to overcome a Democrat-led filibuster.

“You would hope the Senate would allow this exceptionally qualified nominee to receive an up-or-down vote,” Ayotte reportedly said on a conference call Friday.

Ayotte was tapped by President Trump to usher his nominee through the confirmation process.

She accused Democrats of “blocking the process.”

Todd Bookman

 

  New Hampshire's two Democratic U.S. Senators say they will not support Judge Neil Gorsuch, Republican President Donald Trump's pick to serve on the Supreme Court.

Sen. Maggie Hassan says Gorsuch has sided with corporations over families and undervalues the federal act requiring equal education for students with disabilities. Hassan's adult son, Ben, has cerebral palsy. She says Gorsuch has "repeatedly ruled against the rights of people with disabilities."

Getty images, via NPR

NPR Politics team is blogging the Senate Judiciary Committee's hearings on the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court. The live blog below includes streaming video, with posts featuring highlights, context and analysis from NPR reporters and correspondents.

President Trump's pick for the Supreme Court is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. If confirmed, Gorsuch would fill the high court seat left vacant in February 2016, after the death of Justice Antonin Scalia.

Legal decisions are rarely read for pleasure. And though read, re-read, excerpted and quoted, they are not always "quotable." Clocking in at an average of just under 5000 words, they can sound jargony, pompous and bone-dry in the wrong hands. But what about the right hands? Today's 10-Minute Writers Workshop asks an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States about what goes into writing an opinion.

kconnors / Morguefile

The United States Supreme Court has rejected ExxonMobil’s appeal of a $236 million verdict in a case brought against the oil company by the state of New Hampshire.

The legal battle began more than a decade ago when the state Attorney General sued 22 oil companies for using a chemical called MtBE, which can contaminate soil and drinking water.

Richard Head was an Associate Attorney General at the time and now works for SL Environmental Law Group, which worked with the state on the suit. He spoke with NHPR’s All Things Considered host Peter Biello.