rural

James Sarmiento / Flickr

Educators will meet at Plymouth State University this week to take part in a summit on rural schools.

The Rural Educational Leaders Network brings teachers and administrators together to collaborate on issues they face, such as funding, varied class offerings, and population decline.

David Backler is the superintendent of SAU 20 in Gorham. He says this summit is also a chance to bring ideas and practices back to his schools.

"You want to be able to position yourself in a way you can showcase all the things you can provide."

Creative Commons

There are some obvious reasons, and some not-so-obvious for why low income people in rural New England struggle to find affordable housing.

For starters, there is simply a lack of inventory, as developers often prefer to build larger homes where there is more potential profit.

But a new study from UNH’s Carsey School of Public Policy finds that town zoning policies often present a roadblock to low-income housing by setting minimum lot sizes in rural communities.

Jacqui Jade O'Donnell / Flickr/CC

From petting zoos to pick-your-own, farmers across New Hampshire are diversifying in new ways to stay afloat. But that’s raising tensions in some towns, where neighbors say large-scale events like weddings can be a nuisance. We look at the impact of a recent state Supreme Court ruling on the issue and how lawmakers are exploring solutions.

modernfarmer.com

Listen to enough political punditry, and you could easily conclude that America's rural areas are vast swaths of Republican support, with little variety in political opinion or voter demographics.

But recent research from the University of New Hampshire's Carsey School of Public Policy undercuts that assumption. In fact, rural America is actually surprisingly varied, researchers found -- at least when it comes to election results.

The Two New Hampshires

Dec 4, 2013

New Hampshire Economist and Chancellor of the Community College System Ross Gitell is looking at the major demographic and economic differences between the rural and more urban parts of our state - a divide he says is growing. We’re talking about that, and his ideas on closing the gap.  

GUESTS:

N.H. Preservation Alliance

When you hear the phrase "historic preservation," images of Victorian mansions, federalist homes, and gothic revival churches might come to mind.  And those styles are all important parts of the state's architectural landscape.  But in rural areas, a smaller, simpler type of building is just as important to preservation advocates: grange halls.  

Mercy Health / Flick/Creative Commons

Let’s say you are one of the 904 or so residents of Warren, New Hampshire. Let’s say you get sick.  Maybe you just started on a new prescription and are having unwanted side effects.

“Today, they have one of two options,” says Shawn Tester, who runs the day-to-day operations at Ammonousuc Community Health Services, which has five primary care clinics in Grafton and Coos County.

“They either do without. Or they have to travel, oh, I don’t know, 45 miles to our Littleton office to receive that consultative service.”

Protecting The Land

Mar 9, 2012

In New Hampshire we value rural character—a value that's reflected in a strong history of land conservation.  Central to that history is conservation of privately owned land by means of what's called a "conservation easement deed" that limits future development.  It's typically a family decision.  A family chooses to conserve their land so that future generations will know the land as they do.  The property stays on a town's tax rolls and its natural resources are protected in perpetuity.  Land conservation benefits the public, and in most cases landowners are entitled to an income tax dedu