Portsmouth Black Heritage Trail

Courtesy BHTNH

The Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire purchased a property this week which will become its new home in Porstmouth.

 

Part of the group's mission is to share New Hampshire's African-American history.

 

Executive Director JerriAnne Boggis says the new headquarters will be an anchor for statewide educational tours.

 

K2PARN / FLICKR/CC

This Saturday, the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire will put on its annual Juneteenth Celebration.

Juneteenth marks the day when slaves in Texas heard they were free, almost two years after President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation.

For JerriAnne Boggis, the executive director of the Black Heritage Trail, the holiday is time for both festivities and reflection.

Barbara Follett had done more by the age of 25 than many will do in their lifetime. Including vanishing. Today on the show, the disappearance of an American prodigy... and how we forgot her. Plus, the rediscovery of the first known published African American in the country -- a woman from New Hampshire -- and how one woman figured out how to bring LGBTQ pride back to Concord year after year.

In recognition of Black History Month, website Mic.com launched what it’s calling the Black Monuments Project, which imagines new memorials for African American heroes in every state.

 

New Hampshire’s entry is Dinah Whipple, who’s credited with opening the first school for African American children in New Hampshire.

 

The 2017 Black New England Conference began Friday at the University of New Hampshire.

The event brings scholars, writers, and activists together to discuss the history and present-day experience of African Americans in New England.

JerriAnne Boggis with the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire helped organize the event.

37 INK

Enslaved to George Washington, Judge escaped to New Hampshire during Washington's presidency. She was relentlessly pursed by Washington, who sought to regain what he thought of as his property. Decades later, she revealed her story as one of the few early female fugitives. We sit down with the author of a new book on Judge's life. 

This show originally aired on March 2, 2017. 


Wikimedia Commons

Ona Judge, a runaway slave who evaded George Washington himself, lived most of her on New Hampshire’s Seacoast after gaining her freedom. Her story isn't well known, but there are many who are working to keep Judge’s history – and the history of the black community in Portsmouth – alive.

k2parn / Flickr/CC

With its 'lily-white' reputation, the Granite State doesn't often highlight the role that people of color have played throughout its history. A new documentary aims to reveal those hidden stories though, and their importance to the state's history.