Politics

Political news from New Hampshire Public Radio, from the State House to the First in the Nation Primary.

Lauren Chooljian for NHPR

Allegations that New Hampshire Republican state Senator Andy Sanborn made inappropriate comments at the State House are following him on the campaign trail for Congress.

Sanborn is among a handful of Republicans running to replace retiring Democratic Rep. Carol Shea-Porter in the 1st Congressional District. 

Josh Rogers for NHPR

Abortion rights have become a major issue in New Hampshire's Democratic gubernatorial primary.

“The confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, means in almost certain terms the overturning of Roe V. Wade.”

That was Steve Marchand speaking in Portsmouth Tuesday.

U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit

President Donald Trump has chosen Judge Brett Kavanaugh to replace retiring U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy.

Kavanaugh currently serves as a U.S. Circuit Judge on the D.C. Court of Appeals. He’s described as a conservative.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with New Hampshire's Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen about her thoughts on the president's pick.

New Hampshire Attorney General

For the first time ever, the New Hampshire Attorney General's office is auditing all state-level fundraising reports to make sure they're filed on time and include all the right information. And in its initial review, the office found “deficiencies” in 73 of the 142 filings that were submitted for the June 20 reporting deadline.

As they introduce themselves to voters, Democratic gubernatorial candidates Molly Kelly and Steve Marchand are both playing up their modest origins.

The particulars - Kelly was a single mom, Marchand is the son of immigrants who never graduated from high school - are a clear contrast to Governor Sununu. But this focus also makes them something rare in recent state politics. 


Republican Gov. Chris Sununu has signed a bill to continue New Hampshire's expanded Medicaid program for another five years.

The current program uses Medicaid funds to purchase private health plans for about 50,000 low-income residents. It would have expired this year if lawmakers didn't reauthorize it.

The bill also changes its structure to a more cost-effective managed care model. The plan also imposes new work requirements on enrollees and use 5 percent of liquor revenues to cover the state's cost as federal funding decreases.

Jason Moon for NHPR

This week’s Supreme Court ruling limiting the ability of public sector unions to collect "agency fees" from non-members has landed along predictably partisan lines in New Hampshire. 

NHPR

In this Race for the 1st conversation, The Exchange talks with Bruce Crochetiere, a Republican running in the closely watched race for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District. 

Crochetiere is the founder of a technology company, Focus Technology Solutions, and resident of Hampton Falls. 

Josh Rogers for NHPR

Democrat Molly Kelly says the retirement of Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy should be a wake up call for Democrats.

Kelly says the threat to abortion rights and gay rights are reasons to back her over Governor Chris Sununu.

Molly Kelly still has a primary to win, but as she campaigned outside the superior court in Manchester, she was using rhetoric usually reserved for a the home stretch of a general election.

Standing before supporters holding signed with slogans like "Trust Women" and "Save Roe," Kelly said she always had, and always would, stand with women.

Josh Rogers for NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu will call lawmakers back to Concord to fight any effort by other states to force New Hampshire businesses to collect sales taxes on customers who buy goods across state lines. 

Annie Ropeik for NHPR

New Hampshire’s two Democratic candidates for governor have been hitting the campaign trail hard this summer – but so far, they haven’t had much of an audience.

Molly Kelly and Steve Marchand are struggling to draw attention to their primary race – while focused on targeting incumbent Republican Governor Chris Sununu.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

One of Senator Maggie Hassan's interns has become a flashpoint in the national discussion this week over civility in politics, and both of New Hampshire's major political parties are pointing fingers. 

Asea / Flikr Creative Commons

Governor Sununu signed a bill on Wednesday that would extend the subsidy for the Burgess BioPower biomass plant in Berlin by three years.

Under a 2011 agreement, Eversource pays Burgess at above-market prices. That's capped at 100 million dollars, but that could be reached sooner than anticipated.

So, with this new bill, the subsidy will continue for three years after hitting the cap. 

Those who opposed this bill argued that those above-market prices would be passed on to customers.

Updated at 5:54 p.m. ET

Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy announced his retirement Wednesday, setting the stage for what promises to be an epic political battle over his replacement.

A Trump nominee is likely to be far more conservative than Kennedy, who, though appointed by President Ronald Reagan, voted with the court's liberals in some key cases.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

You’ll hear a lot this campaign season about who’s raising the most money — but the most telling parts of a candidate’s fundraising report aren't the details about how much a candidate raked in, but where that money came from.

That’s especially true in the race for New Hampshire governor, where we have a Republican incumbent who can draw on plenty of political and corporate connections, one Democratic challenger who is similarly well-connected to her party’s establishment and another Democrat who says he wants to get big money out of New Hampshire politics.

NHPR Staff

A group of seven Republican state representatives is challenging the nonprofit status of the conservative policy group Americans for Prosperity.

AFP announced weeks ago that it would be conducting a campaign to call out lawmakers who voted against right-to-work, one of the group’s policy priorities for years. The state reps challenging AFP's status were all targets of mailers criticizing them for voting against right-to-work legislation.

The state reps say they want to the state to weigh whether AFP should be required to register with the state as a political committee.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

An intern working for New Hampshire Senator Maggie Hassan was caught on video swearing at President Donald Trump last week.

Senator Maggie Hassan's intern yelled, "Mr. President………" followed by an expletive, across the Capitol Rotunda at President Trump as his entourage entered the building.

That Hassan decided to suspend the intern, Keene State College Student Caitlin Marriott, for one week was first reported late Monday.

The video of the incident has since gone viral. Governor Sununu says he hopes Senator Hassan will decide to do what he called "the right thing."

New Hampshire Congresswoman Annie Kuster joined Democratic delegation that toured immigration control facilities in Texas over the weekend.

The group met with over 40 mothers who were separated from their children, and who are now being detained as a result of the president's recent immigration policies.

Kuster says she observed a lot of confusion among enforcement officers at the detention center who are unsure of how the families would be reunited.

After 18 months on the job, Jeanie Forrester is stepping down as leader of the New Hampshire Republican Party.

Citing "an opportunity to work with local government" Forrester announced her resignation in a late afternoon letter sent to her party's executive committee. 

Her resignation comes as both parties gear up for election season. It also follows campaign finance filings showing the state Democratic Party out-raising the New Hampshire GOP by close to 9-1.

NHPR

In this Race for the 1st conversation, The Exchange talks with Eddie Edwards, a Republican running in the closely watched race for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District. 

Edwards is the former chief of police for South Hampson, and served as the Chief of New Hampshire State Division of Liquor Enforcement. He is a Navy veteran and graduate of the FBI National Academy. 

Our Race for the First conversations focus on the issues at the forefront in the CD1 race, including opioids, guns, veterans, and how each candidate plans to stand out in a crowded race. 

The Exchange

In this Race for the 1st conversation, The Exchange talks with Naomi Andrews, a Democrat running in the closely watched race for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District. 

Andrews is the former chief of staff for Carol Shea-Porter, and also worked as campaign manager for Porter. Andrews is a graduate of Middlebury College, and has a law degree from the University of Richmond. 

Our Race for the First conversations focus on the issues at the forefront in the CD1 race, including opioids, guns, veterans, and how each candidate plans to stand out in a crowded race. 

Governor Chris Sununu has vetoed a bill to expand electric net metering in New Hampshire, but renewable energy advocates hope legislators will force the bill through.

Ted Vansant runs a solar business and leads the state's sustainable energy advocacy group. He calls the governor's move short-sighted.

"I really feel like he's missing an opportunity to move our state toward the growth of good jobs, clean air, clean water, and true long-term cost savings," Vansant says. (Read his organization's full statement below.)

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Bedford State Senator and Republican congressional candidate Andy Sanborn said allegations about his conduct at the Statehouse are being blown out of proportion by local media — despite a recent finding from the New Hampshire Attorney General's office that he did use "inappropriate language" toward a legislative intern in 2013.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Ask any fourth grader, Statehouse tour guide or civically engaged Granite Stater about the size of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, and they’ll likely have one oft-cited number at the ready: 400, the largest of any state in the nation and among the largest in the English-speaking world.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

In this Race for the 1st conversation, Laura talks with Andy Sanborn, a Republican running in the closely watched race for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District. 

Sanborn is a state senator and current chairman of the Senate Ways and Means and Election Law & Internal Affairs committees. 

Our Race for the First conversations will focus on the issues at the forefront in the CD1 race, including opioids, guns, veterans, and how each candidate plans to stand out in a crowded race. 

With a political resume that includes twenty years in New Hampshire Senate, three terms on the Executive Council, time in the New Hampshire House and a run for governor, Manchester’s Lou D’Allesandro can, at this point, rightly claim to being something of a New Hampshire political institution. 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu is reportedly set to veto at least one bill that would subsidize alternative forms of energy.

Sununu plans to veto one or two of the high-profile energy bills legislators passed this session, according to New Hampshire Journal.

Josh Rogers for NHPR

Democrat Steve Marchand made his run for governor official. The former Portsmouth mayor says he sees himself as the frontrunner.

Marchand says he hopes to bring progressive values and an auditor's sensibility to the corner office. After he filed his campaign, he said 200 plus campaign events he's held and the thousands of voters he's talked to have taught him a valuable lesson: dDmocrats  want a candidate who is capable of being frank and getting specific.

Josh Rogers for NHPR

State Democrats are gearing up to try do something they haven’t had to do in 14 years: reclaim the governor’s office from an incumbent Republican.

But before they get to the general election, the Democrats will have to select a nominee, a choice between former state senator Molly Kelly and former Portsmouth mayor Steve Marchand.

Joining Rick Ganley to discuss that race is NHPR’s Josh Rogers. 

Pages