Internet Sales Tax

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: July 27, 2018

Jul 26, 2018

New Hampshire House lawmakers fail to pass a challenge to the Internet sales tax, an apparent rebuke to Governor Chris Sununu and the Senate, which had unanimously approved the original bill. In a tense meeting with EPA officials, Nashua residents demand more cleanup at a toxic site tapped for redevelopment. And state officials hold a public hearing on how best to use $23 million in federal funds to fight the opioid crisis.

GUESTS:

Dean Spiliotes - Civic scholar in the School of Arts and Sciences at SNHU and author of the website NH Political Capital.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

State lawmakers failed to pass a bill Wednesday that backers say would have protected New Hampshire businesses from having to collect sales taxes on behalf of other states.

The outcome, during a special session of the Legislature, was a surprising turn given that leadership in both parties and Governor Chris Sununu backed the broader bill.

NHPR File Photo

State lawmakers will be in Concord on Wednesday to vote on a bill aimed at protecting New Hampshire businesses from having to collect online sales tax.

The Special Session, requested by Governor Chris Sununu and approved by Executive Council, is a response to a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling.

NHPR Staff

A committee of state lawmakers wrapped up work Thursday on bill sparked by a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision. The legislation seeks to block other states from collecting sales taxes from New Hampshire businesses that sell goods online.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: July 13, 2018

Jul 13, 2018

The N.H. Supreme Court decides that the voting bill defining residency/domicile, HB1264, is constitutional. Candidates for New Hampshire's First congressional district hold their first debate, amid new allegations about State Senator Andy Sanborn. State lawmakers return to Concord to figure out how tax-free New Hampshire can fend off an internet sales tax.  And Attorney General Jeff Sessions visits N.H. to discuss the opioid crisis.

JJBers via Flickr/Creative Commons

A major ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court last month means that states that impose a sales tax can now require businesses located outside of their borders to collect that tax and turn the money over. It’s a big deal for New Hampshire, one of the few states without a sales tax.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

State lawmakers will return to Concord on July 25th for a special legislative session in response to an online sales tax ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court.

The Executive Council approved Governor Chris Sununu’s request on Wednesday.

NHPR Staff

The Executive Council will vote Wednesday on Governor Chris Sununu’s request for a special legislative session this summer.

The call for a session stems from the Supreme Court’s recent decision in South Dakota v. Wayfair, in which the majority of justices ruled that states that impose a sales tax can require businesses in other states to collect and remit that tax on their behalf.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

A New Hampshire joint legislative task force has been formed to review potential legislation dealing with the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling that states can force online shoppers to pay sales tax.

Its creation comes in preparation for a possible special session of the state Legislature to pass a bill protecting the state's tax advantage.

The bill would require any jurisdiction seeking to collect sales taxes in New Hampshire to get approval from the state's department of justice, and would authorize the attorney general to file expedited lawsuits against scofflaws.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 29, 2018

Jun 29, 2018

We look at how Supreme Court decisions on union dues and a tax on internet sales may affect businesses here in the state.  More prominent Republican lawmakers are bowing out of state politics.  And, it's not too early to think about tightening up your home for winter - Eversource says rates are going up almost twenty percent. 

Josh Rogers for NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu will call lawmakers back to Concord to fight any effort by other states to force New Hampshire businesses to collect sales taxes on customers who buy goods across state lines. 

SCOTUS

A major U.S. Supreme Court ruling last week could force New Hampshire businesses to collect a sales tax on behalf of other states.

The ruling in the case of South Dakota v. Wafair overturned more than 50 years of legal precedent. The decision is seen as a blow to New Hampshire businesses, which say collecting a sales tax on behalf of other states is burdensome.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Taylor Caswell, a commissioner at the New Hampshire Department of Business and Economic Affairs, about how the state plans to respond.


A Review of Recent SCOTUS Rulings

Jun 24, 2018
wikipedia

It's been a busy few weeks at the U.S. Supreme Court. We'll focus on several recent decisions  addressing online business, digital privacy, religious freedom, and sports betting.  The online-sales ruling in particular has made big waves here in New Hampshire. 

SCOTUS

A major U.S. Supreme Court ruling out Thursday could force New Hampshire businesses to collect a sales tax on behalf of other states.

 

The case of South Dakota v. Wayfair centers on how to treat items sold online, and whether states that impose a sales tax, such as South Dakota, can require businesses who sell goods to South Dakota residents to collect and remit those taxes.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

The United States Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday in a case with huge potential impact on New Hampshire businesses, as well as anyone who shops online.

The case essentially pits the 45 states that impose a sales tax against the handful that don’t, including the Granite State.

On Thursday, the State of New Hampshire filed a legal brief in the U.S. Supreme Court case South Dakota v. Wayfair, which is scheduled for oral arguments later this month.

The case could have huge ramifications for how businesses collect sales taxes when selling goods to customers across state lines.

New Hampshire’s U.S. senators don’t often see eye to eye, but this week they’re teaming up trying to defeat a bill that would force businesses to collect online sales tax for the first time.