Immigration

Robert Garrova for NHPR

On Thursday, protesters delivered a petition to Governor Chris Sununu’s office they say is signed by more than 3,600 people. They're asking for the governor to call for an end to Border Patrol checkpoints on Interstate 93.

 

In the past few years the American Civil Liberties Union has been at the forefront in the fight to protect the rights of immigrant detainees.

Now the ACLU is expanding its Immigrants' Rights Project in New Hampshire, which the organization says is dedicated to expanding and enforcing the civil liberties and civil rights of immigrants and to combatting public and private discrimination against them. For this effort, the New Hampshire ACLU has hired its first immigration legal fellow.

SangYeob Kim spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello about his new position.

  Catholic Charities New Hampshire will receive more than $350,000 in grant funding to protect immigrant victims of crime.

 

The money comes from the federal Victims of Crime Act and was allocated through the New Hampshire Department of Justice.

 

Cathy Chesley is director of immigration legal services for Catholic Charities. She said the money will allow her organization to continue to support immigrant families who may fear deportation and not seek out help.

 

Via Wikimedia Commons

  

Thursday was the court-ordered deadline for border authorities to reunite families separated at the U.S.-Mexico border. A Keene woman whose sister-in-law and nephew were separated says they've now been reunited, but the reunification comes without answers to key questions.

Why were they cleared for reunification while others still wait in detention centers? Why were they not deported back to Honduras? And how long can they stay? 

 

While the Trump administration fortifies the southern border, there's growing concern over the number of foreigners entering the country illegally across the porous northern border with Canada.

People crossing the border between Vermont and Quebec have paid smugglers up to $4,000, usually payable when the immigrants reach their U.S. destination, according to officials and court documents.

While the number of arrests is tiny compared with the southern border, the human smuggling is just as sophisticated.

Courtesy of U.S. Customs and Border Protection

The ACLU of New Hampshire held a Know Your Rights training in Concord Thursday night. The training was in response to the immigration checkpoints conducted by U.S. Customs and Border Protection along I-93.

Border/State

Jul 13, 2018
Robert Garrova

Conversations around immigration have become a hot-button issues once again, not just in national rhetoric, but here in the Granite State. On today's show we'll hear of one family's vacation that came to a screeching halt on I-93, what an open borders policy could look like, and we'll hear about the sport that transcends borders.  

  •   Plus a conversation with Milford grad and Seattle Reign FC's Morgan Andrews
  • A Father-Daughter bond with deep love of country and soccer 

dawn paley / Flickr/CC

Americans across the country with relatives detained at the border are working to be reunited with their loved ones.

Courtesy photo

Victoria is 23 and working her way through college. Over Memorial Day weekend, she and her parents piled into the car and drove from New York for a vacation in the North of New Hampshire.

Hanging out at the hotel, taking a ride on the Cog Railway, that kind of thing.

CBP.gov

U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy of Vermont introduced legislation last week that would put limits on where Border Patrol officers can operate immigration checkpoints. The “Border Zone Reasonableness Restoration Act of 2018” is co-sponsored by Senator Patty Murray (D-Wash.).

Robert Garrova for NHPR

More than a hundred people rallied outside Dover City Hall Wednesday night to protest family separations in immigration cases.

Speakers with the ACLU of New Hampshire and local faith-based groups denounced the Trump administration's “zero-tolerance” immigration policy. While many of the remarks centered around the national conversation on immigration, several speakers called out recent Border Patrol checkpoints in the White Mountains as leading to family separations.

New Hampshire Congresswoman Annie Kuster joined Democratic delegation that toured immigration control facilities in Texas over the weekend.

The group met with over 40 mothers who were separated from their children, and who are now being detained as a result of the president's recent immigration policies.

Kuster says she observed a lot of confusion among enforcement officers at the detention center who are unsure of how the families would be reunited.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

New Hampshire's Democratic Congressional delegation says President Donald Trump's executive order ending the policy of separating families fails to protect those children who were already taken from their parents at the border.

Sens. Jeanne Shaheen and Maggie Hassan say the order does not provide a solution for the children and parents who remain separated. Shaheen says it is a violation of the law, leaving children indefinitely in detention centers.

President Donald Trump signed an executive order Wednesday ending his administration’s immigration policy to separate children from their parents at the U.S. border.

Congresswoman Annie Kuster is planning to visit McAllen, Texas on Friday, where hundreds of children are being kept in a former warehouse. She spoke with All Things Considered Host Peter Biello about her trip and what’s next for immigration reform.


Updated at 5:18 p.m. ET

President Trump signed an executive order on Wednesday to end his controversial policy that has resulted in thousands of family separations and brought criticism from Democrats and Republicans.

"We're going to keep families together but we still have to maintain toughness or our country will be overrun by people, by crime, by all of the things that we don't stand for and that we don't want," Trump said Wednesday morning, when he announced that he would sign the order.

Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

People in New Hampshire have been reacting to the news of President Trump ending the family separation policy at the border. NHPR’s Leila Goldstein gathered some voices in Concord earlier Wednesday before the executive order was signed.

New Hampshire Public Radio will air a one-hour special from 1A titled "Families At The Border" Wednesday at 8 p.m.

Thousands of children have been separated from their parents at the southern border of the United States under the federal government's "zero tolerance" policy.

A Quinnipiac University poll found that while a third of voters oppose the policy - more than half of Republicans polled support the policy.

DHHS

 

Trump administration officials have been sending babies and other young children forcibly separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border to at least three "tender age" shelters in South Texas, The Associated Press has learned.

Lawyers and medical providers who have visited the Rio Grande Valley shelters described play rooms of crying preschool-age children in crisis. The government also plans to open a fourth shelter to house hundreds of young migrant children in Houston, where city leaders denounced the move Tuesday.

CBP.gov

Travelers on Interstate 93 near Woodstock encountered another Border Patrol Checkpoint between June 15 - June 17. 

The U.S. Border Patrol confirmed Tuesday afternoon that it made a total of five arrests for people who "did not have  legal immigration status." 

People arrested during the operation were from Mexico, El Salvador, China, Ecuador and Brazil, the agency said in a statement

The ACLU released a statement on its social media accounts calling for bus transit company Concord Coach Lines to cease what it says is complicity with immigration officials.

The civil liberties group also posted video allegedly showing travelers encountering immigration agents as they prepared to board a Concord Coach Lines bus in Maine. In that video, some of the customers question a company employee.

Daniela Allee / NHPR

About 60 people gathered in front of the US Attorney's Office in Concord today to protest the Trump administration's order to separate children from families at the border. 

Demonstrators held signs that read "Stop Separating Families," and "Las Familias Deben Estar Juntas."

Robert Garrova for NHPR

The non-profit Regional Economic Development Center is launching a program that will provide business loans to first-generation immigrants in New Hampshire. Called the New Hampshire New Americans Loan Fund, it will offer micro-loans capped at $50,000, with interest rates starting at seven percent.

The Fund has its roots in a program developed for new residents in the City of Concord, says REDC President Laurel Adams.

NHPR File Photo

 

The New Hampshire House has delayed action on a bill that would ban anyone who is not a legal resident from the state's adult education programs.

Supporters say the roughly $4 million the state spends on adult workforce training programs should be reserved for people who can legally work in the United States. Opponents say the bill would hurt immigrants and refugees working toward citizenship. The bill passed the Senate in March but the House voted 233-97 on Wednesday to further study it.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement / Wikimedia Commons

An Indonesian national who's lived in the U.S. for 18 years has been ordered to leave the country this week.

Bobby Candra of Somersworth had been regularly reporting to Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials for years after overstaying a visitor visa, his lawyers say.

But in February of last year, ICE reversed course and denied Candra a stay of removal, according to his attorneys.  

CBP.gov

U.S. Border Patrol agents detained two individuals in Woodsville, N.H., on Friday.

The Vermont-based advocacy non-profit Migrant Justice is working on behalf of one of the individuals, who was arrested the Woodsville Walmart and is being held in Strafford County jail in Dover, according to Abel Luna, an organizer with the group.  

U.S. Court of Appeals

  A Brazilian immigrant living in Nashua who narrowly avoided deportation earlier this month is still at risk of having to leave the country.

 

Elvecio Viana is 65 and has lived in the U.S. for 27 years, according to his attorney.

 

Robert McDaniel is a litigation lawyer representing Viana. He's filed a motion for a stay of deportation.

 

U.S. Court of Appeals

 

An immigrant from Brazil living in New Hampshire has won a temporary stay from a federal court to block his deportation, hours before he was ordered to board a plane.

The 1st Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston said it needed time to review the case of 65-year-old Elvecio Viana, of Nashua.

Viana's lawyers say he came into the United States 27 years ago on a visa. He recently filed papers for permanent resident status.

Robert Garrova for NHPR

New Hampshire lawmakers in the House held a hearing today for a bill that would restrict access to adult education programs in the state. Senate Bill 525 narrowly cleared the Senate.

 

A crowd of dozens showed up in opposition to the bill and a larger hearing room was needed to accommodate them.

 

Courtesy the Okeny family

  Ageth Okeny fled war in Sudan with her four children. In Egypt, she says she applied for refugee resettlement.

 

“They asked me in interview: ‘You have specific place to go?’ I said no, I just want to leave with my kid[s], I need the safety place to be safe with my children,” Okeny says.

 

“So they brought me here to Manchester,” she says.

 

 


DACA, or "Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals" has been in the news a lot recently, and for the past half year, Congress and the White House have gone back-and-forth over the fate of the Dreamers, debating what to do about their special but temporary immigration status.  We take a regional look at this issue, both political and personal.

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