Hiking

Looking back on my past two years as a single person fitfully dating in New Hampshire, I don’t actually remember most of the first dates I’ve been on. I remember the second and third dates, in which conversation flows normally and you both feel comfortable enough to really learn about each other.

 

But on first dates, I enter a kind of fugue state, propelled by self-awareness and nervous drinking. I know roughly what was said and how much I should be embarrassed by it, but not much more than that.

 

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New Hampshire's Fish and Game Department says trail maintenance projects have caused hikers to seek alternate routes to the summit of Mount Washington, which may be resulting in more rescue calls.

The department says Huntington Ravine has been a consistent producer of rescue calls this summer, when many groups have been taking the Huntington Ravine Trail instead of the Tuckerman Ravine Trail to the summit.

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The New Hampshire Fish and Game Department says two sets of hikers had to be rescued from the White Mountains because they were unprepared for the terrain and cold, windy conditions.

A 77-year-old Florida man and 71-year-old woman from New York were found at 11:20 Friday night off the Tuckerman Ravine trail after requesting a rescue. Both had hypothermia.

Volunteers worked overnight carrying them to the Mount Washington Auto Road where they were driven down. The woman was taken by ambulance to the hospital.

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Two teenagers from Massachusetts have been rescued from an icy New Hampshire trail considered too dangerous for descending any time of year.

Tim Sackton / Flickr Creative Commons

In Morning Edition’s series, Radio Field Trips, we’re taking you to places in New Hampshire you may not have heard about.  

For our latest story, Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley and producer Mary McIntyre visited Prescott Farm in Laconia for a moonlit night hike.

Do you have a suggestion for an upcoming Radio Field Trip? Click here to send us an email and let us know!


Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Women are one of the fastest-growing demographics for outdoor recreation in New Hampshire.

The state Department of Fish & Game has encouraged that for more than 20 years with its “Becoming an Outdoors-Woman” program, or BOW. It helps the department make money and cut down on preventable rescues.

NHPR’s Annie Ropeik attended the winter BOW last weekend in Holderness, and found out it’s also about women helping women learn to fend for themselves. 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Dozens of bundled-up hikers tromped onto the snowy trails of five New Hampshire State Parks Monday, marking the frigid start of 2018 with the parks’ eighth annual First Day Hikes.  

The forecasted high at Wellington State Park in Bristol was only 3 degrees. Park workers handed out beanies, face buffs and hot cider as hikers headed into the woods.

Even the wind chill warning didn’t stop Kathy Bishop and Martha Doelle – both teachers from Enfield – from strapping on snowshoes for a trek up into the park's higher elevations.

Chris Jensen / NHPR

The New Hampshire Division of Parks and Recreation is hosting free, guided hikes on New Year’s Day as part of a national event called First Day Hikes.

The department is offering five different hikes, from Silver Lake State Park in the southern tier, to Milan State Park in the North Country.

Each is free, family–friendly, and guided by either park staff or volunteers from conservation groups.

I rolled into the parking lot of the Mountain Wanderer Book Store in Lincoln, New Hampshire. I was there to meet two White Mountain hiking experts. Authors Mike Dickerman of Bond Cliff Books and Steve Smith, editor of the Appalachian Mountain Club’s White Mountain Hiking Guide. Steve also owns the Mountain Wanderer. From the bookstore, we drove to a nearby trail head for the Pemigewasset Wilderness Area in Lincoln.

From Small Mountains to Twin Peaks

Aug 11, 2017
Logan Shannon / New Hampshire Public Radio

Diehard New Hampshire hikers tend to fixate on four-thousand footers, but as any peak bagger who's climbed Owl's Head or Mount Isolation knows, big mountains aren't always the best mountains.

On today’s show, a day out with a heartwarming hiking group that's been shouldering packs since 1979: the Over the Hill Hikers.

We continue with a seemingly simple listener question about the Wapack Range that sends our producer into a geological can of worms for this week's Only in New Hampshire segment.

And, Twin Peaks is back and weirder than ever. We’ll talk to Kristine McKenna, the author who collaborated on a forthcoming memoir and biography of David Lynch, about the filmmaker's life and career. David Lynch is being honored at this year’s Medal Day at the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough.

This N.H. Hiking Club Has Been 'Over The Hill' For Decades

Aug 11, 2017
Photo courtesy of the Over the Hill Hikers

There are loads of hiking groups in New Hampshire—groups for women, families with young kids, birders...a quick search on Facebook will turn up one or more that fits your style. The Over the Hill Hikers club has been climbing New Hampshire’s mountains since 1979. Back then, the group's schedule was mailed out by hand. 

Word of Mouth's Virginia Prescott recently took a hike with the club, and came back with plenty of stories to tell.

Via the NH State Parks Blog

When we started asking for questions from our listeners about the state, we got pages and pages of submissions online; so many we couldn’t answer them all. 

So I combed through and picked one that sounded interesting to me. And that’s how I ended up calling a woman named Jen, and asking one of the stupidest questions I’ve ever asked.

Courtesy

A Florida man is recovering from flesh-eating bacteria he encountered while hiking in New Hampshire.

Thirty-two-year-old Wayne Atkins of Miami has been hospitalized since Father's Day weekend. WHDH-TV  reports Atkins was left in a two-week coma because his organs were shutting down.

Doctors say the bacteria entered Atkins' body through blisters on his foot from when he went on a hiking trip. He started feeling sick when he got back to Miami.

Going for a Hike this Holiday Weekend? Remember These Tips

Jun 30, 2017
CREDIT JEFF PANG / FLICKR

Rescues in New Hampshire’s mountains have been on the rise this year and state officials expect the holiday weekend to only add to those numbers.

Janis Oppliger / Unsplash

The Town of Gorham has applied to be an official Appalachian Trail Community.

The Appalachian Trail, which runs from Georgia to Maine, passes through the town of Shelburne, which is east of Gorham. Hikers often leave the trail to pick up mail and shop in Gorham.

If the application is approved, Gorham businesses could appear on the Appalachian Trail Community's official maps and website.

N.H. Sees Rise in Wilderness Rescue Missions

May 5, 2017
FILE

Late Thursday night, New Hampshire Fish and Game Officials rescued a 53-year-old man on Mount Lincoln after they’d been searching for him for 3 days.

We’ve been seeing a number of stories like that lately, and state officials have confirmed it: wilderness rescue missions this year in New Hampshire are higher than normal. And the two busiest months are yet to come.

Wikimedia Commons

Officials with the state parks department presented plans for a new Franconia Notch trail Thursday. 

The trail would begin near an existing viewing plaza, dedicated to the iconic, now-fallen, rock formation known as the Old Man of the Mountain.

Hikers on Franconia Ridge
Jeff Pang / Flickr

  Five New Hampshire state parks are offering free admission for hikers on New Year's Day.

Guided hikes will be available at all five parks on Jan. 1. All 50 states open some parks for free as part of the America's State Parks First Day Hikes initiative.

The five open parks are Monadnock State Park in Jaffrey, Silver Lake State Park in Hollis, Weeks State Park in Lancaster, Wellington State Park in Alexandria, and Wentworth-Coolidge Mansion State Historic Site in Portsmouth. The guided hikes will range from 1 to 3.2 miles.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

The Appalachian Mountain Club is withdrawing its proposal for a new overnight hut in Crawford Notch State Park.

The AMC notified the New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic Development of its decision after more than a year of what the non-profit called ‘careful consideration.’

mwms1916 via Flickr

As fall comes to a close, winter imminent, there is a quiet that sweeps across New Hampshire. We celebrate the changing of the leaves but once they’ve fallen from the trees there’s really not much to look at before snowfall, right? Of course not! There’s always something waiting to be discovered in your back yard and this time of year is no exception.

Recently the Something Wild team went for a hike. One thing to bear in mind when walking with knowledgeable biologists like Chris and Dave, is that hikes take longer than they might if you were walking on your own. 

Sean Hurley

Six years is barely the blink of an eye for the White Mountains, which have defined New Hampshire’s landscape for more than a hundred million years. But to a father, six years can feel like a lifetime - as NHPR’s Sean Hurley discovered while hiking recently with his son.


Ian Hart

This past winter four New Hampshire friends set out for a 12 day thru hike of the Cohos Trail -  170 miles from Crawford Notch to the Canadian Border.  When they began their hike in early February they had no idea that if they finished they'd become the first hikers to ever complete the trail in winter.  NHPR's Sean Hurley has more. 

Matt Bowman - Androscoggin Valley Search and Rescue

With winter now here, New Hampshire's search-and-rescue teams are watching for storms in the Presidential mountains and worrying that once again, a hiker will make a decision that puts lives at risk.

That's what happened last February, when Kate Matrosova, a 32 year-old from New York, who thought she could beat an approaching storm.

'Ill-Prepared' Hiker Rescued On Mt. Washington

Nov 10, 2015
Mike Pelchat

Monday  afternoon a 24-year-old hiker who thought he could take the Cog Railway down after climbing Mount Washington was rescued after making trying to descend the steep Huntington Ravine Trail. The hiker, Andy Nguyen of Billerica, Massachusetts, was at the summit when he found out the trains were no longer operating, said Sgt. Mark Ober of New Hampshire Fish and Game.

r12a via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/ARmMo

Yesterday, the filing period for the New Hampshire primary began, which means candidates can now secure a place on the February ballot.  But one important prediction of electoral success happens long before voters get to the polls. Today, the invisible endorsement primary. Then, climbing conditions can get rough at twenty three thousand feet, but as one climber tells us, human waste is the real problem when scaling Everest. 

Chris Jensen for NHPR

Sometime next year an official with the White Mountain National Forest will try to answer a complex question: How wild should the wilderness be?

The issue is whether to remove – or replace - a decrepit bridge in the Pemigewasset Wilderness Area.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

Egg is dripping down Jeff Colt’s bare back as he stands in the kitchen of the Appalachian Mountain Club’s Greenleaf Hut just below Mount Lafayette. Such is the peril of carrying about 28 pounds of eggs along with 50 pounds of other food.

But then again, running a restaurant high in The White Mountains is a little different than running one in Portsmouth, Laconia or Colebrook.

Sean Hurley

For the last ten years, photographer Chris Whiton has been combing through old guide books, hundred year old newspapers, and even modern maps to find lost waterfalls in the New Hampshire wilderness.  Some of them used to be located on old trails long since abandoned.  

Sean Hurley

With more than 4000 miles of hiking trails, it's not too hard to get away from it all here in New Hampshire. But if you want to get even further away, you could head out on the Cohos Trail, one of the wildest, most remote trails in New England. I recently went for a hike on the Cohos with trail founder, Kim Nilsen.

In the dirt lot at the base of Owl's Head mountain, 68 year old Kim Nilsen pulls a weaved pack basket, made by his daughter, over his shoulders.  

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