Fake News

Today is the first day of the Radically Rural Summit in Keene, which will bring together hundreds of people working on a variety of issues in rural communities. The two-day summit will take place in venues throughout downtown Keene. One focus of the conference is the impact of "fake news" on rural America, with three sessions on local journalism. The Keene Sentinel is co-hosting the event.

More than 300 news outlets across the country published editorials today denouncing President Trump's attacks on the media. Several New Hampshire publications participated in the campaign, which was lead by the Boston Globe's Opinion Page Editor. 

Since taking office, the President has called journalists "crooked," the "enemy of the people," and, of course, "fake." 

"What he refers to as fake news isn't fake at all," said Dana Wormold, Editor of the Concord Monitor's opinion page. "It's news reports that he's uncomfortable with for whatever reason." 

This week, we're going deep into our country's founding through radio drama, the classic musical "1776," and the inside story of a New Hampshire-based fake news site. 

David Folkenflik joins us as part of our Justice & Journalism series with UNH Law School. We talk about the vast changes in journalism he's seen in recent years, from the impact of social media, to "fake news," to covering the #MeToo movement, including at NPR. 

The term “fake news” became part of the national lexicon leading up to last year’s presidential election.

But in the months since President Trump took office, there’s now been a flurry of liberal conspiracy theories being spread across social media.

Becoming Savvy About Fake News

Mar 21, 2017
Pexels

The wave of fake news that flooded Facebook and other social media during last year's election campaign was a wake-up call for many.  But fake news  has actually been around for a long time. Seventy-five years ago, regional newspapers in the South falsely reported that first lady Eleanor Roosevelt  was quietly organizing  black women into secret "Eleanor Clubs," with the motto: "A white woman in the kitchen by 1943."    In the digital era, that kind of rumor can spread far and worldwide, in no time.