Diversity

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

Governor Sununu's Council on Diversity and Inclusion will hold a public forum in Laconia on Monday evening. 

This is the next stop for the council in a series of listening sessions held across the state.

The public forums are organized to collect stories and concerns from the community so they can inform future policy and foster equity in the state. 

The community forum will be held from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Monday at Laconia Middle School at 150 McGrath Street.

 

Governor Sununu's Council on Diversity and Inclusion held its fifth listening session in Manchester Wednesday night.

 

About a hundred people participated in the forum, which has the goal of gathering feedback on how the state can become more welcoming for people of all backgrounds.

 

Sitting around folding tables at Brookside Congregational Church, attendees spoke of their personal experiences.

 

Cosme Neles said he's concerned about how immigrants see the Granite State.

  Governor Sununu's Advisory Council on Diversity and Inclusion will hold its fifth listening session in Manchester on Wednesday evening.

 

The public forums are organized to collect stories and concerns from the community so they can inform future policy and increase equity in the state.

 

The State Board of Education has released a statement regarding recent Facebook comments made by a Department of Education employee.

Last week, Anthony Schinella, the department's communications director, made posts criticizing a gathering of state business leaders focused on diversity in the workforce. 

He wrote that increased diversity could bring more crime and create a "cesspool." 

The Board said it's "deeply disappointed" by the comments and that "our public schools are and ought to be welcoming to everyone." 

Robert Garrova for NHPR

A group of New Hampshire leaders from the private and public sectors met recently to discuss what they see as a challenge for the state: How to attract a diverse workforce.

It was an energetic group of folks, all sitting around circular tables in a conference room in Manchester. Organizers said they were pleased with the large turnout.

Will Arvelo, Director of New Hampshire’s Department of Economic Development was one of several who led the event and he laid out the group’s goals.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: August 3, 2018

Aug 3, 2018

State Sen. Jeff Woodburn arrested on domestic violence and assault charges, followed by calls for his resignation.

Governor Sunuu's commission on diversity is inciting some strong - and some say racially charged - reactions.

Rudy Giuliani, former New York City Mayor, visits the state to endorse Republican Eddie Edwards in his bid for N.H.'s First Congressional district. 

New Hampshire Education Commissioner Frank Edelblut condemns a statement by a departmental spokesman that has been called racist. 

Prosecutors say a former Wolfeboro dog breeder found guilty of animal abuse misled the court during her sentencing. 

And the Concord Police are the latest department to throw down in a national viral video challenge.

New Hampshire Education Commissioner Frank Edelblut is condemning a statement by his departmental spokesman that has been called racist.

Anthony Schinella is the Department of Education's communications director.

In a recent discussion on his Facebook page, Schinella criticized a gathering of state business leaders focused on diversity.

Joe Gratz / flickr, creative commons: https://www.flickr.com/photos/63126465@N00/117048243

Last summer, an alleged attack on a biracial boy in Claremont made national headlines. There were also racially charged incidents at UNH, and on a school bus in the Oyster River School District.

In December, with those events swirling in the local news, Governor Chris Sununu announced a major change within the state’s top law enforcement agency.

Savannah Maher/NHPR

It's 6:30 in the morning. Hamida Hassan is scrolling through Instagram while Kenchael Emadamerho styles her hair into box braids.

"So basically you grab a piece of extension depending on how thick they want the braid to be. And wrap it around her actual natural hair. And then I would just braid it."

Emadamerho demonstrated the braiding process, which she said would take about six hours. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The governor's advisory council on diversity and inclusion says the state ought to recognize Juneteenth, the holiday marking the end of slavery. As NHPR's Josh Rogers reports, that's one of the few concrete recommendations from the council's preliminary report. 

Britta Greene / NHPR

An advisory council appointed by Governor Chris Sununu to look at race and diversity issues said they'll return to Claremont after an initial public meeting Thursday night.  

 The city was the site of an attack on a young biracial boy last year that made national headlines. Discussion at the meeting, part of series of listening sessions the council is performing around the state, focused to a large degree on that incident.

Ryan Lessard for NHPR

The chairman of the Governor’s Council on Diversity and Inclusion is raising questions about the announcement of UNH’s new president, James Dean.

Rogers Johnson, who is also president of the Seacoast NAACP, has called for more transparency in the search process.

Now he says the unveiling of UNH’s choice for president seems to emphasize his ability to raise revenue for the institution.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu announced in December a new advisory council focusing on diversity and inclusion.

The council will present the governor with recommendations on how New Hampshire can improve equity in the state, including on issues of race, gender, age and disability.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Rogers Johnson who will chair the council.


NHPR File Photo

 

Governor Chris Sununu has announced the members of a new advisory council on diversity and inclusion.

 

The council includes representatives of state agencies, the university system, the ACLU, law enforcement, and others.

 

The group will be chaired by Rogers Johnson of the NAACP.

 

Sununu announced the creation of the council in December, following several high profile incidents of racial bias around the state.

 

The council's first meeting is scheduled for Feb. 8.

The full list of membership is below.

Jason Moon for NHPR

It's been nearly five months since a racist bullying incident shocked the Oyster River School District community.

Parents and school administrators met Wednesday to talk about what's been done in response, and priorities going forward.

It was this past September when a 7-year old black student was bullied with racist language while riding the school bus home. The incident shocked many, including Oyster River Superintendent Jim Morse.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Speaking at a Martin Luther King Jr. event in Manchester, Governor Chris Sununu urged New Hampshire residents to add their voice to community forums in the coming months.

 

He pointed to his administration’s new council on diversity and inclusion, as well as a new Civil Rights Unit established within the Attorney General’s Office.

 

 

Britta Greene / NHPR

A new Civil Rights Unit in the New Hampshire Department of Justice shines a spotlight on the need for greater diversity and inclusion. Gov. Chris Sununu's announcement this week follows months of news reports about racial incidents, from Claremont to Durham and the University of New Hampshire.

Tackling the state's workforce issues

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  Gov. Chris Sununu just made two announcements on equity issues at the state level. The state Department of Justice is launching a new civil rights unit. And the governor is forming a new advisory council on diversity and inclusion.

 

Peter Biello, host of All Things Considered, speaks with Andrew Smith, who will be involved in the new state efforts. Smith works in the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services. He works with groups in New Hampshire after racial incidents occur.

 

Mike Ross, UNH

Local chapters of the ACLU and the NAACP are asking the University of New Hampshire to emphasize issues of racial diversity and equity in the search for the university’s next president.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Last night in Durham, parents, teachers, and students from the Oyster River School District met for a conversation about diversity and discrimination.

The event comes several weeks after allegations of racist bullying in the school district.

As NHPR’s Jason Moon reports, the event last night was a time for people to share their stories and to chart where to go from here.  

 

Recent allegations of racist attacks or bullying among school-aged children have schools and communities doing some soul searching, along with establishing new policies and procedures.   

Grace Caudhill, the mother of a 7-year-old boy allegedly racially harassed on a school bus in the Oyster River School district told NHPR reporter Jason Moon that she has heard from the parents of biracial children in other parts of the state who describe similar experiences of "racial denigration and racial hate in school."  (Listen to the full story here.) 

Jason Moon for NHPR

The first few weeks of school in the towns of Durham, Lee, and Madbury have been clouded by allegations of racist bullying  on a school bus.

NHPR’s Jason Moon recently sat down with the superintendent of the school district and the parents of the alleged victim to hear how each are grappling with the situation.

The Oyster River School District will be requiring diversity training for all staff in the wake of an alleged racist bullying incident earlier this month.

Superintendent Jim Morse says the trainings will be led by a member of the state health department who specializes in racial minority affairs. Morse says the training will be required for every district employee, including himself.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Over the next several months, the Claremont schools will take a closer look at issues of discrimination and bullying in the district. This comes after an alleged racially motivated attack of a young boy in town by local teenagers.

Oyster River School District

The Oyster River School District is grappling with a racially charged incident that took place on a school bus earlier this month.

Superintendent Jim Morse says he was taken aback by the revelation that an elementary school student from a biracial family had been bullied with racist language by another student on the bus.

He says the episode was out of character for the district which includes the towns of Durham, Madbury, and Lee.

Peter Biello / NHPR

Robert Azzi is an Arab-American Muslim who wants you to ask him anything about his faith. The Exeter-based photojournalist has put together a program called “Ask a Muslim Anything” that he hopes will help reduce misunderstandings between people of different faiths. 

Scripps National Spelling Bee via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/nMQtsf

Since 2007, every single winner of the Scripps’ National Spelling Bee has been Indian-American – a fact that fuels stereotypes about so-called “model minority” students. 

On today’s show: the perils of labeling.  Then, we turn to a different kind of label: electrohypersensitivity. We’ll take a look at a growing group of individuals who claim to be suffering from the condition, and why they’ve moved to the national radio quiet zone. 

NHPR / Ryan Lessard

Manchester is the state’s largest city, and it’s also the most racially diverse.

In the wake of tensions between police and citizens in several large cities, the Manchester Police Department recently held a public forum to talk about policing in a diverse community.

David Mara is chief of the Manchester Police Department.

He joins Morning Edition to talk about the issue.

When you first talked about the idea behind the forum, you said you didn’t want to have a Ferguson in 10 years. What did you mean by that?

Best of 2014 - How We Talk About Race In N.H.

Dec 30, 2014
Sean Hurley / NHPR

This spring, after racist remarks by Los Angeles Clippers Owner Donald Sterling and Wolfeboro Police Commissioner Robert Copeland, outrage dominated national headlines. Now, after events in Ferguson and New York City, race relations seem more fraught than ever, but a call for a more honest conversation about race still resonates.

This program originally aired on June 5, 2014.

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