Bears

 

A Groton resident was seriously injured after a bear entered her home. 

 

Jim Juneau of New Hampshire Fish and Game says that a wild black bear was likely startled when a 71-year old woman discovered it in her kitchen early Tuesday morning. 

 

"The bear reacted in a panicked manner and unfortunately she sustained some injuries," he says.

 

The woman is currently at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, after undergoing surgery. 

 

Courtesy Ron DiMasi

A bear in Hanover nicknamed "Mink" is now the subject of a second online petition aimed at saving her life.

The first, last year, gained so much attention that Governor Chris Sununu ordered Fish and Game to pardon the animal. At the time, her then-yearlings had gotten into a home in town.

This time around, the petition comes after Mink’s relocation to the North Country. According to the latest update from Fish and Game, she’s covering long distances to try to get home. 

Courtesy of Crawford Notch Campground

 

A momma bear and her cubs are no longer going to be causing mischief by raiding trash bins and bird feeders near Dartmouth College in New Hampshire.

Officials said the bear nicknamed Mink was captured Friday and hauled north to Coos County, near the Canadian border, where she was released with a tracking collar.

Andy Timmins, bear project leader for the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department, tells the Valley News that he hopes the bear stays put. But, he added, "I'm not sure this is the end of the story."

Courtesy of Crawford Notch Campground

Cornish police shot and killed a bear Monday that had  repeatedly returned to a local property to feed on the homeowner's chickens. 

The homeowner, who runs a daycare onsite, first called the police Saturday.

Courtesy Sarah Lindberg

State wildlife officials are considering scrapping their plans to relocate a female bear from the Hanover area.

It’s the latest turn-of-events for an animal whose fate has swung dramatically over the past year, aided in part by a grassroots public-awareness campaign and a last-minute reprieve by Governor Chris Sununu.

Fish and Game officials decided last spring to kill the bear after her then-yearlings got into a home in Hanover.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: May 11, 2018

May 10, 2018

The state's new Child Advocate launches an investigation into the Sununu Youth Center following allegations of a pattern of illegal use of restraints on juveniles there.  For the third time this year, the New Hampshire House of Representatives votes against a bill to create education savings accounts. Voting laws and Medicaid expansion are on the governor's desk to be signed into law.  And it's that time of year - bears are out, looking for easy pickings at your bird-feeder...even in Manchester.

WATCH THE SHOW:

Courtesy Sarah Lindberg

New Hampshire wildlife officials have a new plan for a bear in Hanover that gave local and state officials the run-around last year.   

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Spring in New Hampshire means black bears are emerging from their dens to search for food – including around your backyard bird feeder.

And warming winters are bringing the bears out sooner. So state officials now want people to bring in their bird feeders earlier than ever.

Kelly Dwyer lives in a big, airy house nestled up against the woods in Hooksett. Being back here, she says, has its perks:

“The surprise of what is going to show up that day – what’s going to fly in or walk in – it’s really exciting,” she says. “And just the peace and tranquility.”

https://youtu.be/Aw7CgEYs7M8

With spring on the way, state conservation officials say it's time for residents to take in their bird feeders.

Even as winter weather continues, the Department of Fish and Game's bear project leader Andrew Timmins says bears are waking up – and they're hungry for rich, fatty foods like birdseed.

"Bears have excellent memories. They know where they've got 'em in the past, and they'll routinely check those areas to see if those feeders are still available,” he says. “And they'll just start searching backyards in general looking for that food.”

Courtesy Sarah Lindberg

One of three bears relocated from the Hanover area this spring was shot and killed by a hunter in Quebec shortly after it was released, according to Andy Timmins, bear project leader for the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department.

Black Bear Spotted and Killed in Downtown Nashua

Jul 4, 2017
Michael Webber via Flickr CC

A wild black bear was shot and killed in downtown Nashua late last night.

Living with Black Bears in Back Yards

Jun 5, 2017

The recent saga of the troublesome family of bears in Hanover, destined to be killed after they entered a home in search of food, is one of the latest examples of conflict between black bears and humans in New Hampshire.  Governor Chris Sununu intervened, and the three yearlings were captured and relocated to the north country, although the mother bear has yet to be located.  The Hanover human-bear conflict generated concern nationwide, with hundreds signing an online petition and flooding N.H. Fish & Game with calls.  Why did this conflict resonate with so many - and how do we continue to live with bears in New Hampshire?

 


 

Three juvenile bears in Hanover that were initially targeted to be destroyed have been trapped and relocated.

New Hampshire Fish & Game had said last week the three bears and their mother had to be killed, after two of the cubs entered a home. But Governor Chris Sununu then intervened, saying the bears should be released in a remote location.

Courtesy Sarah Lindberg

The State Fish and Game Department is being flooded with calls about four bears in the Hanover area. Officials recently decided to trap and kill the bears after two of the animals entered a home in town. 

Andrew Timmins heads the department’s bear program and says many people are calling from far away, wanting to save the animals.  

State officials have set traps for four bears in the Hanover area after two of the animals recently entered a home there. Once caught, the bears will be shot, according to Mark Ellingwood, Wildlife Division Chief for the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department.

Conservation biologists say that the good news for wildlife is there are still extensive tracts of forest habitat in the northeast. Yet as humans have built up roads and housing developments, crossing between key habitat areas — such as from the Adirondacks to the Green Mountains — can be a dangerous trip for a moose or a bear.   

Michael Webber via Flickr CC

Black bears are as much a part of New Hampshire as fall foliage and stone walls, nevertheless they are a misunderstood species. To better understand the species, we wanted to talk to a bear, the closest thing we could get was Ben Kilham. And that’s pretty close, which is evident when you meet him. He’s over six-feet tall and moves with a slow ambling gait. His ursine tendencies aren’t surprising when you consider Kilham’s been studying and living with black bears for nearly 25 years.

Sean Hurley

Growing up in Loudon, Andrew Timmins didn’t see his first bear until he was nearly 20.  Now, as Fish & Game’s Bear Project leader, Timmins manages the state’s population of more than 5,500 bears. NHPR’s Sean Hurley recently spent a day with Timmins at a bear hotspot at the Attitash Ski Resort and learned how the state regularly catches troublesome bears and relocates them to the northernmost part of the state.

 

The New Hampshire Fish and Game Department is asking residents to take down bird feeders to avoid attracting bears that have emerged from their winter dens early this year.

The department's bear project leader says bears are emerging from their dens about a month early due to the mild winter and recent spring-like conditions.

He says bear activity and sightings have become more frequent in the past week and will become increasingly frequent in the coming weeks.

Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/cjdv7S

Black bears are as much a part of New Hampshire as fall foliage and stone walls, nevertheless they are a misunderstood species. To better understand the species, we wanted to talk to a bear, the closest thing we could get was Ben Kilham. And that’s pretty close, which is evident when you meet him. He’s over six-feet tall and moves with a slow ambling gait. His ursine tendencies aren’t surprising when you consider Kilham’s been studying and living with black bears for nearly 25 years.

Moiggi Interactive / Flicker CC

New Hampshire is one of 13 states that allows baiting to hunt bears. But last fall four bears died suddenly in the town of Stark after eating chocolate at a bait site, and now the Fish and Game Commission is considering banning the use of chocolate as bear bait.

Michael Webber via Flickr CC

 

The public is getting a chance to weigh in on proposed charges to bear and moose hunting in New Hampshire, including banning the use of chocolate as bait for bears after four bears were found dead last fall due to a chocolate overdose.

The Fish and Game Department is holding a public hearing Wednesday night in Concord to discuss the proposals. Necropsy and toxicology reports confirmed the bears died of heart failure caused by theobromine, a toxic ingredient in chocolate.

Michael Webber via Flickr CC

  New Hampshire Fish and Game laid out a proposal Wednesday that would ban the use of chocolate to bait bears. This follows four confirmed bear deaths. Officials say the animals overdose on the theobromine in the sweets.

Those against the measure say limiting chocolate would be a better alternative to banning it.

The Fish and Game Commission voted to move the proposal forward. The public will have a chance to submit their concerns.

Here at Something Wild, we’ve been thinking a lot about winter and the different strategies animals use to get through these cold, harsh months. There are quite a few techniques to survive winter if you don’t live in a toasty house with central heating or a roaring wood stove.

The top 5 are:

Michael Webber via Flickr CC

Supporters of a referendum to ban the use of bait, hounds and traps in Maine's annual bear hunt began canvassing neighborhoods in Portland over the weekend. Mainers for Fair Bear Hunting say they don't oppose hunting in general, just the use of what they consider cruel and inhumane practices. They plan to contact tens of thousands of voters across the state over the next few weeks to make their case. Opponents are also gearing up.  And both sides are feeling confident as the election draws closer.

Michael Webber via Flickr CC

State Fish and Game officials say they’ve seen more bears put down this year than usual.

They’re asking homeowners to take precautions to avoid drawing them out.

New Hampshire Fish and Game Bear Biologist Andy Timmins says in a typical year, the department and homeowners combine to kill roughly 15 bears because of so-called nuisance conflicts.

He says this year, they’re already past that.

Michael Webber via Flickr CC

The number of encounters with bears in the White Mountain National Forest is on the rise early this season, prompting rangers to issue early warnings and step up enforcement of safety rules.

Colleen Mainville, a spokeswoman for the national forest, says the black bears are getting bold. One tried to enter a tent while another was searching the back of pickup trucks for food. There are an estimated 4,800 to 5,000 bears in the state.

Most people will never see a bear but when the critters find food, they learn that they can mooch a meal from the two-legged visitors.