Word of Mouth

Saturdays at 11 am, Tuesdays at 8 pm

Word of Mouth explores the nooks and crannies of New Hampshire. Airs Saturdays at 11 am and replays Tuesdays at 8 pm.

Subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts or find us wherever you get your podcasts!

Send us an email: Word of Mouth

Leave us a message: 603.513.7796

Curious about things you've seen, heard, or experienced in our state? Send us your "Only In New Hampshire" questions here!

An Old-Timey Treasure Hunt

Nov 3, 2011
Nancy Greenleese

Forget Geocaching...these folks are going old-school with something called Letterboxing...and they love it. WoM correspondent Nancy Greenleese bring us the story.

The Newest New Kids

Nov 3, 2011

Brooke Hauser, author of The New Kids, Big Dreams and Brave Journeys at a High School for Immigrant Teens, talks about the hard knocks the newest kids face.

Links:

Word of Mouth for November 3rd, 2011

Nov 3, 2011
Jurvetson / Flickr Creative Commons

How impossible inventions defeated the odds. What makes a business "Good?" The science of retractions. And an old-timey treasure hunt in a geocaching era.

The Glee of Politics: Which TV shows do it best?

Nov 2, 2011
Jay Cox / Flickr Creative Commons

Produced by Chris Cuffe

Alyssa Rosenberg is the pop culture blogger for thinkprogress.org.  She joins us to review this season's political stories on television, and explain who does it best and why.

Links:

 

The Prep School of Rock N'Roll

Nov 2, 2011
Ben McLeod / Flickr Creative Commons

A group of teachers from St. Paul's in Concord trades hall-passes for instruments after school.  Two members join us to talk about the art of finely-aged Rock N'Roll.

Links:

Prep School of Rock

Nov 2, 2011

The Fletchtones might be a group made up of prep school faculty and staff, but that doesn't mean they don't rock hard. 

 

Links:

Word of Mouth for November 2nd, 2011

Nov 2, 2011
USB / Flickr Creative Commons

The other drug war south of the border. TV gets politics right...except when it doesn't. A school for immigrant teens. And the Fletchtones rock on.

As The Publishing World Turns...

Nov 1, 2011
Zimpenfish / Flickr Creative Commons

Amazon is back in the business of getting books on print - only now, they're hopping the middle man. Jason Boog, Editor of the publishing website Galley Cat, explains.

Links:

Genetic Genocide: GMO Mosquitoes

Nov 1, 2011
Karl-Ludwig Poggeman / Flickr Creative Commons

Editor for Scientific American Michael Moyer explains how genetically-modified mosquitoes could stop the spread of Dengue Fever; unless uncomfortable corporate practices don't cause a GMO backlash first.

Links:

Deaf Jam Poetry - the signs of spoken word

Nov 1, 2011
Kaveh Khodjasteh / Flickr Creative Commons

Deaf Israeli slam-poet Aneta Brodski collaborates with Palestinian interpreter Veronica Staehle, uniting culture and language through art.

Links:

As one of the nation's top experts on U.S. Senate office decor, no one is more pleased than me that New Hampshire's Kelly Ayotte decided to bring "Oscar the Moose" to Washington.

Uprooted: Heartache and Hope in New Hampshire

Oct 5, 2011
Ricardo Angulo

Virginia speaks with one of the refugees in the film, Deo Mwano, and the film’s executive producer, Mary Jo Alibrio from the University of New Hampshire’s Center for the Humanities.

An Act of Hate You Have to See to Believe

Sep 22, 2011
O World of Photos / Flickr Creative Commons

Refugee families are targeted with paragraphs of graffiti in Concord, New Hampshire. Sarah Palermo is the reporter covering the story for the Concord Monitor.

Links:

Outcasts United

Sep 12, 2011

In 2009, we spoke with new York Times reporter Warren St. John about his book Outcasts United– which tells the story of the Fugees soccer team and the growth of community around them.  The book is currently being featured in the Concord Reads program at the Concord Public Library.  Concord is a city that has experienced its own influx of refugees from war torn countries in recent years.  Here is what Warren had to say about the Fugees' inspiring story.

Links:

Hollywood's 9/11

Sep 10, 2011
(Photo courtesy New York Time Out)

If you ever want to know the state of the American politics and culture at any point in the past hundred years, look to Hollywood. Casablanca (1942) reflects American patriotism and sense of purpose and belief in supporting the war effort and On The Waterfront (1954) gives a read on the Cold War anxieties that permeated American society. So what happened in American cinema after September 11th? We have film reviewer for New England Cable News Garen Daly with us to talk about what Hollywood has been reflecting back to us about that day since.

Elizabeth Gilbert Grows Up

Jul 31, 2011
(Photo by The American Libary Association via Flickr/Creative Commons)

Elizabeth Gilbert reads from her new book, Committed: A Skeptic Makes Piece with Marriage, and talks about her relationship, skipping yoga in the mornings, and why Pamela Anderson is a great philosopher.

Amy Winehouse: Gone but never forgotten

Jul 30, 2011
(Photo courtesy RealBollywood.com)

A reflection on reactions to the pop singer's death this past weekend. 

Writers on a New England Stage: Ben Mezrich

Jul 26, 2011

This segment was produced by Shannon Dooling.

The controversial author and self-proclaimed inventor of a new genre of literary non-fiction, Ben Mezrich's bestselling books include Bringing Down the House and The Accidental Billionaires. The first was the source for the film, 21 and the second was adapted into the Academy Award-winning movie The Social Network.

(Photo by Frederic Poirot)

William Gibson is the best-selling author of Neuromancer and nine other visionary novels, along with several short stories and screenplays. He is also a futurist who described the look and function of the information age long before internet and video game culture became dominant. Gibson also predicted the global ascent and eventual collapse of a financial market built on illusion, and envisioned the rise of reality television.

Writers on a New England Stage: David McCullough

Jul 5, 2011
David J. Murray, cleareyephoto.com

David McCullough is widely known for his Pulitzer Prize-winning writing on great leaders and American politics, in books such as Truman and John Adams. In his newest work he turns his focus to Americans abroad in Nineteenth Century Paris.

In this edition of Writers on a New England Stage, McCullough reads from his newest book, The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris, a chronicle spanning generation, and sits down for a conversation about his work, his influences, and America's age-old fascination with The City of Light.

Writers on a New England Stage: Neil Gaiman

Jun 29, 2011
David J. Murray, cleareyephoto.com

Neil Gaiman is often credited for expanding the audience for comics beyond white, teenage boys with his Sandman series. But he is also a true multi-media phenom, a filmmaker, (now) recording artist, screenwriter for the likes of Dr. Who, and prolific author, including the multi-award winning, groundbreaking novel American Gods.

Ann Patchett: Write What You Know Only If It's Interesting

Jun 15, 2011

Ann Patchett's new novel, State of Wonder, is topping all the big reading lists right now. She reads from the book, tells a terrifying true story about her close encounter with an anaconda, and has a blisteringly funny conversation with Virginia.

Links:

Joyce Carol Oates Remembers

Mar 31, 2011
David J. Murray, cleareyephoto.com

Joyce Carol Oates reads from her new book, A Widow's Story, and talks about her writing life and the experience of crafting this book with Virginia Prescott.

11 for '11: Sherry Turkle

Jan 11, 2011

How has technology changed the ways that we interact with one another? Sherry Turkle's Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other is the third in a trilogy exploring this question. Social networking, e-mail and texting, Turkle says, provide the façade of socialization but ultimately leave their users dissatisfied and disconnected. It may be time to reflect and reconsider the role we really want technology to play in our lives.

Links:

Writers on a New England Stage: Joseph Ellis

Dec 2, 2010

Joseph Ellis, Pulitzer Prize winning author and historian, reads from his new book, First Family. He also talks about why the likes of Abigail and John Adams will never come again.

Links:

Writers on a New England Stage: Simon Winchester

Nov 10, 2010

The bestselling author of The Professor and the Madman, and Krakatoa visited the Music Hall in Portsmouth to talk about his new book, Atlantic: Great Sea Battles, Heroic Disasters, Titanic Storms and a Vast Ocean of a Million Stories. It’s a biography of the ocean, from its origins 195 million years ago, through centuries of discovery, trade, war, and harvest to what he calls “the forgotten ocean” of today.

Links:

Writers on a New England Stage: Margaret Atwood

Sep 23, 2010
<a href="http://www.cleareyephoto.com/">David J. Murray</a>

Today on Word of Mouth, a conversation with Margaret Atwood, recorded live at the Music Hall in Portsmouth as part of the “Writers on a New England Stage” series.  Virginia spoke with the award winning author of the dystopian novel The Handmaid’s Tale. They talked about pessimism, hope for the future, and learning survival skills in Canada. 

Writers on a New England Stage: Isabel Allende

May 13, 2010

Today on Word of Mouth, a conversation with Isabel Allende, live from the series. Allende is the best selling Latin-American author in the world. Beginning with her 1982 debut, House of the Spirits, Ms. Allende’s novels have been praised for their historical accuracy, deep sensuality and what critics call "magical realism." She has written 17 more books including novels, memoirs and young adult stories since she was forced to leave her native Chile. She and her family fled after a military coup toppled the presidency of her father’s cousin, Salvador Allende.

Writers on a New England Stage: Michael Lewis

Apr 9, 2010

The author of Liar’s Poker, Moneyball, and The Blind Side joined NHPR's Jon Greenberg at the most recent installment of Writers on a New England Stage to discuss his latest work of nonfiction, The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine. It's a character-rich and darkly humorous account of how the US economy “was driven over the cliff” by a collection of professionals entrenched in the financial world.

Writers on a New England Stage: Jodi Picoult

Apr 8, 2010

Today on Word of Mouth, a conversation with Jodi Picoult, live from the "Writers on a New England Stage" series. The prolific novelist’s 17th book, House Rules, recently debuted at the #1 spot on the New York Times bestsellers list for hardcover fiction. We spoke to her about her work and her life as a mother of three here in Hanover, New Hampshire. But first, we hear Jodi Picoult reading from her new book.

Pages