Word of Mouth

Saturdays at 11 am, Tuesdays at 8 pm

Word of Mouth explores the nooks and crannies of New Hampshire. Airs Saturdays at 11 am and replays Tuesdays at 8 pm.

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Curious about things you've seen, heard, or experienced in our state? Send us your "Only In New Hampshire" questions here!

Type 1 Diabetes Spike

Jan 23, 2012
Photo by Rakka, courtesy of Flickr creative commons

The alarming spike in type-1 diabetes. Though type-2, commonly known as adult-onset diabetes, has been in the spotlight recently with Food Network star and butter-abuser Paula Deen's announcement that she is living with the condition, type-1 is also on the rise. The worldwide annual growth rate has climbed past three-percent. With its serious health risks and lack of a cure, public health researchers are scrambling to find the cause of type-1's recent spike.

Word of Mouth for 01.21.12

Jan 20, 2012
Photo by Leo Reynolds, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

                                                         

 

Part 1: Revenge of the Web-nerds

Darlingside

Jan 19, 2012
Robb Stey

The “string-rock” quintet Darlingside is based in New England, but its lineage includes California pop harmonies, Appalachian root riffs, and classical arrangements all shadowing that full-on American mongrel we call rock music.  After earning high praise and an eager following for a self-produced EP, Darlingside is rolling out a new subscription album, called Pilot Machines, throughout 2012. Darlinsgide

Andrew Jackson…A Musical?

Jan 19, 2012
Photo by HistoryByDay, courtesy of Flickr creative commons

Without using Wikipedia (now that you’ve made it through the one-day withdrawal) tell me: who was America’s 7th president? Stumped? I’ll give you a hint. He’s on the twenty-dollar bill. Still not sure? Then I’ve got the musical for you. Expressed through the angsty tones of emo and punk-rock, structured like skit comedy, and shorter than the shortest harry potter film – Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson is a lesson in American history built for a post-MTV generation.

Mitt versus the world

Jan 19, 2012
Photo by Joeff, courtesy of Flickr creative commons

As news broke that Mitt Romney might not have been the victor in Iowa after all, his campaign reacted diplomatically, with a statement acknowledging a virtual tie between him and rick Santorum. But diplomacy, especially when it comes to pledges on foreign policy, has been one of the things found lacking in Romney’s campaign messaging, especially from the point of view of the global press.

This segment was produced without Wikipedia

Jan 18, 2012

 The Stop Online Piracy Act now in front of Congress – and its Senate counterpart bill, the Protect IP Act, or PIPA, are both stirring up vigorous debates in political, media and  IT circles.

We needed scientists for THIS?

Jan 18, 2012
(Photo by maybeemily via Flickr Creative Commons)

Rap mogul Jay-Z and his pop star wife Beyonce welcomed a baby girl at Lenox Hill hospital two weeks ago. The news quickly outpaced other top stories on Twitter, helped along by the announcement of her name: Blue Ivy Carter, just the latest celebrity moniker to inspire a collective groan and the Twitter hashtag #NamesBetterThanBlueIvy.

Crossing the BLVD

Jan 18, 2012
Photo by mgarbowski via Flickr Creative Commons

Archie Bunker wouldn’t recognize the Queens of today, where cultures normally  thousands of miles apart live on the same block, and 138 languages can come together in a classroom. On the streets of Queens, passers by might hear Albanian hip-hop wafting from a market stall, or a  gypsy punk riff sill out of a café.  The diverse colors, accents and clothing illustrate “globalization” and “multiculturalism” in a way that corporate strategists cannot. Judith Sloan and Warren Lehrer are finely attuned to these sounds.

(Photo by Menage a Moi via Flickr Creative Commons)

We've gotten loads of feedback about our new credits. Mostly, they've been enthusiastically embraced, but one listener disagreed on his Facebook page, tagging us a post that called our new credits "juvenile." Ouch.

What do you think? Listen here and leave a comment on our Facebook page, or send us a tweet. 

Weight Watchers' new magic formula

Jan 17, 2012

In the world of weight loss programs, Weight Watchers rules, with more than a million members worldwide. New CEO David Kirchoff is credited with increasing meeting attendance in North America by fourteen percent, and upping online membership by 64%. Those numbers mean money, of course. Weigh Watchers is valued at an estimated at five billion dollars…double that of a year ago.

Going Gourmet with Game

Jan 17, 2012
Photo by Ulterior Epicure via Flickr Creative Commons

 A warning to vegetarians and vegans, this segment is about meat. And fish. And foul. Take coffee-crusted elkstrap, pheasant marsala, or country-fried antelope...yup, gourmet game.

Colin Kearns is deputy editor of Field and Stream Magazine, and editor of the Wild Chef column and blog, where such recipes are shared with hunters and consumers of all things hunted. 

 

Word of Mouth for 01.14.12

Jan 13, 2012
Photo by Lockhart Steele, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

Part 1: Political Red Herrings

Absent tight races or sex scandals, pundits, op-eds and media-makers occasionally flirt with tantalizing uncertainties to liven things up. Salon news editor Steve Kornacki wrote about five of the biggest non-stories you’ll hear far too much of during campaign 2012 - none of which (he says) will amount to a hill of beans.

Part 2: Ten Revolutionary Tea-Parties you weren’t invited to

OH. MY. GODS.

Jan 12, 2012
Photo by Sp!ros via Flickr Creative Commons

How many times have we heard that studying the classics is no longer useful, an anachronism? Then out come movies like Clash of the Titans, or Troy, and suddenly everyone is hungry for more. From Star Wars to Harry Potter, references to ancient myths are inescapable.

A Campaign to End Awesome? NOOOO!!!!

Jan 12, 2012
Evan Hahn via Flickr Creative Commons

Produced by Avishay Artsy

We all have our linguistic pet peeves. I, for one, bristle when I hear “literally” to describe things that aren’t literal at all. I admit, I was an English major, and still grieve a little inside when people use “was” for the conditional tense instead of “were.” A painter and writer living in Los Angeles is campaigning against a far less arcane peeve: the overuse of “awesome”. 

Meet the blogger behind Gwarlingo

Jan 12, 2012
Gwarlingo's Michelle Aldredge

Somewhere on the list of why making a radio show is so fun would be this:  surfing the internet is part of the job. In other office pods, people have to Google on the sly. We consider following links and electronic crumbs rather productive. You never know when you might accidentally stumble onto your next guest.

Faith on the Field

Jan 12, 2012
Ed Clemente Photography via Flickr Creative Commons

And now, a new tick on the American conversation on religion. Yes, politicos discuss how GOP candidates appealed for the Evangelical vote in Iowa, and will again in South Carolina. But, another discussion arises from the spectacle of one Tim Tebow. The Denver Broncos quarterback’s out-of-nowhere fourth quarter surges and open displays of devotion make him the target of criticism and adulation.

The YouTube Celebrity in You

Jan 11, 2012
Photo by, eurleif, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

In 2007, Tay Zonday uploaded his video, “Chocolate Rain” to YouTube.  Before the rain soaked the ground, it became a viral sensation. Unlike many VH1 one-hit-wonders, Zonda’s career continues to thrive more than five years after the chocolate storm ran its course.  For musicians, finding a label was been traditionally been the way to stardom. For aspiring actors, heading to Hollywood has been the well-trod, yet equally unreliable gateway. Would-be YouTube celebrities can come from anywhere.

A Safeway in Arizona

Jan 11, 2012
Photo by knomad, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

A year ago this week, Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords was shot while meeting constituents outside an Arizona supermarket. Six others were killed and thirteen injured when Jared Loughner unloaded thirty-two rounds of bullets from a Glock handgun into the crowd. A year later, on January 8th, Gabby Giffords led the pledge of allegiance at a candlelight vigil in Tucson.  Reporter and author Tom Zoellner is a fifth-generation Arizona native. He considers the baffling “Tuscon tragedy” to be more than a random act by a mentally ill aggressor.

Hope: A Tragedy

Jan 11, 2012

 There are strange noises and a rotten smell  coming from the attic of Solomon Kugel’s old farmhouse in upstate New York. His wife resents him, his kid is sickly and his mother, who grew up in the United States, imagines herself a Holocaust survivor with PTSD. Yet, Kugel remains an optimist, which his shrink declares is the problem: the more hell bent one is on life, the more terrified of death.

Three Wishes, Three Surprise Endings

Jan 11, 2012
Karen and Casey Jordan via Flickr

Statistics from the Pew Research Center show that single women over 35 now account for around fifteen percent of the birthrate in the united states. One reason may be that there are so many more options for women who have delayed motherhood -- from adoption to using donor sperm to freezing their own eggs. Journalists Pamela Ferdinand, Carey Goldberg, and Beth Jones all had fulfilling careers, rich friendships, and hapless relationship histories.

Stealing their future...

Jan 9, 2012
Photo by Theein via Flickr Creative Commons

Thousands of foster kids are released from the system at age 18 only to realize that they are thousands of dollars in fraudulent debt. It can take years for any target of identity theft to restore their credit, and even longer to recover a sense of security. Former foster kids without family support or the benefit of experience or access to resources can be especially challenged.

10 Tea Parties You Haven't Heard About

Jan 9, 2012
Photo by Spychick via Flickr Creative Commons

With the first in the nation primary swirling around us, we turn to the spread of the Tea Party…circa 1774. We’re talking about the Annapolis Tea Party…the New York Tea Party, and other protests that boiled over in the colonies from Maine to North Carolina. These copycat protests were buried by the 92,000 pounds shoved overboard in Boston.

Tea, anyone?

Jan 9, 2012

Long before playing a role in sparking the American Revolution, tea drove history, something largely unknown to me when i took a proper afternoon tea in Boston, with a man affectionately known as “the Nose." Giles Hilton is famous for his ability to sniff out the finest tea leaves from around the world. He’s Teamaster at Whittard of Chelsea, tea merchants in England since 1886. Giles gave me the chance to steep in his knowledge of just what it takes to make the perfect cup of tea.

Giles Hilton on UK Food TV

 

 

Republicans...in tights!

Jan 9, 2012
Photo of Ari Garnick by Darren Garnick

As filmmaker and freelance journalist Darren Garnick discovered, his son's simple question may have revealed a side of the GOP hopefuls we wouldn't otherwise have seen.

Watch what happens when Ari asked Mitt Romney, Jon Huntsman, Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich, and Herman Cain whose tights they'd most like to wear...and why. Darren and Ari join us to talk about what it means when candidate invokes Superman or Spiderman, or, in the case of Ron Paul, when he can't seem to pick a hero at all.

 

Is Retail Politics Dead?

Jan 6, 2012
Photo by Lawria via Flickr

It’s game on in the Granite State. Every four years, the TV trucks pull in, guys in suits and sunglasses show up in your local breakfast joint, and the opinions of New Hampshire citizens are momentarily considered to be of national importance. It’s the first in the nation primary time!

The Value of New Hampshire

Jan 6, 2012
Photo by JCB Walksh via Flickr

We've heard several takes on the downward slide of retail politicking in New Hampshire…now, to other trending topics in the 2012 campaign…joining us with his take on New Hampshire's role in the political process is Bill Curry. He’s a long-time political analyst and NPR commentator who was a close advisor to Bill Clinton during his presidency .  

For those who revel in political swag and campaign catering, the New Hampshire primary is a perfect opportunity to socialize with like-minded supporters and bathe in the glow of national media.  But for many others, politics are a private affair – that is until you receive a pre-recorded via the home phone - usually, right around dinner time.

A Celestial Victor?

Jan 6, 2012
Photo by FlickrDelusions via Flickr

Bookies take bets on winners and losers. Political junkies follow the news, budgets and campaign strategies to determine the odds. Astrologers follow the candidates destinies as mapped out in the heavens. The Nashua Patch asked astrologer Dorothy Morgan to consult the stars  for clues to the outcome of the New Hamsphire primary.

Snap Snap…Not a Celeb?

Jan 5, 2012
Photo by, ILoveDoodle, courtesy of Flickr creative commons

While celebrity might be an aspiration to some, actual stars complain about the adoring hordes fawning over their every move and the aggressive paparazzi capturing sloppy visits to the coffee shop and gym. For those envious of Kardashian-style celebrity, there is one man to call.

The Civil War Era's Kardashian

Jan 5, 2012

News of the spectacular break-up between actress Adah Issacs Menken and bareknuckle boxing champ John Heenan splashed across the papers that year. Heenan accused his wife of bigamy. That was just one charge against the woman who was best known for bounding across the stage strapped to a horse in a skin-tight flesh colored costume.

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