Word of Mouth

Saturdays at 11 am, Tuesdays at 8 pm

Word of Mouth explores the nooks and crannies of New Hampshire. Airs Saturdays at 11 am and replays Tuesdays at 8 pm.

Subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts or find us wherever you get your podcasts!

Send us an email: Word of Mouth

Leave us a message: 603.513.7796

Curious about things you've seen, heard, or experienced in our state? Send us your "Only In New Hampshire" questions here!

Marlborough Police Department

When cops go online, sometimes they make jokes. 

A Game of Failures

Oct 12, 2018

In the Summer of 1946, the Nashua Dodgers did something no other professional baseball team had done in the U.S. in the twentieth century: they played ball with a racially integrated team.

Word of Mouth Presents: Bear Brook

Oct 5, 2018

Two barrels. Four bodies. And the decades-long mystery that led to a serial killer.

In this episode of Word of Mouth, we take a listen to Bear Brook: A new podcast from NHPR about a New Hampshire cold case that's changing how murders will be investigated forever.

Franconia Lives

Sep 28, 2018
(C) CHESTER LUDLOW, 1972

Once, a utopian experiment burned bright and brief in the Great North Woods.

Help us decide what story to tackle next in our "Only in New Hampshire" series. We're looking for your questions about wages. Wondering why our minimum wage is lower than in our neighbor states? What the wage gap looks like in New Hampshire? The impact of seasonal employment? Why your wages haven't gone up?

Only in New Hampshire is your place to ask questions about the state we all call home.

Submit your questions below. We'll start reporting the story in October for an upcoming episode of Word of Mouth and our newscast.

_

Ursula Marvin
Smithsonian

Today, we're looking skyward to explore the life of geologist Ursula Marvin, who used her exceptional ability to identify minerals to study asteroids. Planetary geology wasn't a field that welcomed women but Marvin never let that stop her. In the 1970s, she became the first woman to travel to Antarctica to hunt for meteorites. 

Also, another story from our continuing series on vanity plates.

Growing up is hard enough. Now imagine that very few people look like you - in your community, schools, and even your home. This can often be the world of transracial adoptees. These are kids adopted by families of a different race or ethnicity. On today's show we're exploring the complex conversations around these adoptions and hearing from adoptees of color. 

Taylor Quimby

If you live on New Hampshire's seacoast, or in the White Mountains, then you might already know parts of this story. But chances are, the details will still surprise you.

 

On this episode, we dig into an international exchange program called Summer Work Travel: a cultural exchange program that supplies the hospitality industry, fast food restaurants, and shopping outlets with foreign labor.

A Company Town

Aug 24, 2018

In the sleepy town of Pittsfield, New Hampshire you can find a global leader of manufacturing and technology right under your nose. On today's episode we're returning to our New Hampshire Firsts series with the company that invented firefighting turnout gear: Globe Manufacturing.

Jess O'Hare loved living in New Hampshire. She moved to Concord for a job as an environmental organizer just after her college graduation and enjoyed the affordability, tight-knit community, and natural landscapes.

"Life in New Hampshire was mountain-biking, swimming, skiing, sometimes even before work. You'd just get it all in," she said. "And it was easy to do that."

But there was just this one thing. 

What does that list of state abbreviations on your beer bottle mean? And why didn't New Hampshire make the cut?

On today's show, we dig into the decades-long fight for, and against, bottle deposit laws -- in New Hampshire, and across the country. 

Gap Mountain Goats

As far back as ancient Egypt, it was possible to rent a professional mourner to cry and moan at your funeral. They put on a dramatic show so people know you'll be missed. Even now, in parts of the world, if you fork over a little extra cash, a hired mourner will even hurl themselves into your grave. Newer fads also include renting an extra family member, professional cuddlers-for-hire, or even an entourage, complete with paparazzi and an adoring crowd of cheering fans.

But in New Hampshire, rental options lean towards the bucolic: instead of a team of human landscapers, you can hire yourself a herd of goats to clear brush.


Full-time workers often spend more time with their colleagues than their families. So, what's the history of work in the U.S. What changes could be in store for the workweek?

And why can it feel so liberating to leave a terrible job? On today's show we'll look into all of those questions and more. 

Some kids spend their summers swimming and paddling. Others hammering and drilling.

 

Bella and Kaylee are two of the leaders of Girls at Work. It’s a program for girls based in Manchester that teaches girls how to build everything from shelves to picnic tables using power tools.

 

Justine Paradis

Do you ever wonder about the sounds we hear every day, by choice or by circumstance? How does the sound of our daily environments affect our lives and minds? One man seeks the quietest place in the White Mountains and we explore the art of the soundscape.  

For nearly two decades, the Furniture Masters of New Hampshire have been leading a program at the state men's prison in Concord. They teach a woodworking skill to inmates in the hobby shop, and return a month later to check on the progress.

For some inmates, these workshops have opened the door to mastering the craft of furniture making; and to a changed perspective on the world.

On this week's episode, we hear from these inmates, and from a UNH professor and woodworker wants to bring the same skills to incarcerated women.

Border/State

Jul 13, 2018
Robert Garrova

Conversations around immigration have become a hot-button issues once again, not just in national rhetoric, but here in the Granite State. On today's show we'll hear of one family's vacation that came to a screeching halt on I-93, what an open borders policy could look like, and we'll hear about the sport that transcends borders.  

  •   Plus a conversation with Milford grad and Seattle Reign FC's Morgan Andrews
  • A Father-Daughter bond with deep love of country and soccer 

This week, we're going deep into our country's founding through radio drama, the classic musical "1776," and the inside story of a New Hampshire-based fake news site. 

Since May, a string of viral Facebook posts have led some to ask: what’s the difference between satire, and fake news? Producer Taylor Quimby investigates.  

(Editor's note: we highly recommend listening to this story.)

Why is it so difficult for a woman of color to find a good haircut in New Hampshire?

Courtney Marshall returns to the show with a problem: where can she get her hair done? We investigate the hair scene for people of color in the Granite State. Plus, spoils from the annual Gilsum Rock Swap.

Laurie Shaull, courtsey Flickr CC: https://bit.ly/2lrvtMI

Bloody footprints. A rifle thrown to the floor. Bodies splayed across the bedroom. It's a gruesome scene. Still, you might have to squint to make it all out. Because this murder is in miniature... Today on the show, a profile of Frances Glessner Lee, called "the Mother of Forensic Science," and her famous crime-scene dioramas. Plus, a visit to a Juneteenth Day event in Nashua and the next installment in our NH license plate culture.  It's a Word of Mouth smorgasbord!

Andover Beacon

Two hundred years ago, Richard Potter was one of the nation’s most famous entertainers, but he’s all but vanished from public memory. So has his extravagant house. 

Grassroots

Jun 15, 2018

Over the past five years, New Hampshire's cannabis legislation has gone from non-existent to possible all-out legalization. But among neighboring states, New Hampshire still lags behind. On today's show we're answering an #OnlyinNH question that asks, "why, when compared to other New England states, is New Hampshire so conservative on cannabis legislation?" And then a different kind of high - we head to the mountains to see who's hiking and smoking?   

SquidFlip: Concord's Kid Entrepreneur

Jun 8, 2018
Taylor Quimby

Recently, I visited a summer-season open house at SquidFlip on Warren Street in Concord: A basement business where you can find brightly colored furniture, side-tables made from vintage suitcases, and hand-mixed chalk paints with charming New Hampshire-based names. It's a cute little business, but even more remarkable is the boy who runs it: 11-year old Owen Simoes.

The Splatmasters

Jun 8, 2018
Photo courtesy of Joe Drinon

There's so much happening in this show, it's hard to know where to start. We interview a very together kid entrepreneur. We investigate the semi-secret economy of international workers in New Hampshire. We talk about NH vanity license plates.  And we tell the incredible, mostly true story of how a multibillion dollar sport got its start in the woods of Henniker.  

We love making this show. Help support local journalism by donating here: bit.ly/2LeT8ei.

In 1859, a Mrs. H.E. Wilson published a novel at her own expense. The book told the story of a biracial girl named Frado abandoned by her mother to be raised by a prominent family where she suffered verbal and physical abuse at the hand of her employers in a New Hampshire town famous for its abolitionist activities.

The novel didn’t sell well - likely less than 100 copies - and the book as well as its author fell into obscurity.

Justine Paradis

What if the gym were a joyful place?

We love making this show. Help support local journalism by donating here: bit.ly/2LeT8ei.

New Hampshire loves its vanity plates. We were supposedly the first state to offer them and rank second in the nation (behind Virginia) in the number of vanity plates on the road. There's even a NH License Plate Museum.

Our own parking lot at NHPR is filled with vanity plates. 

Barbara Follett had done more by the age of 25 than many will do in their lifetime. Including vanishing. Today on the show, the disappearance of an American prodigy... and how we forgot her. Plus, the rediscovery of the first known published African American in the country -- a woman from New Hampshire -- and how one woman figured out how to bring LGBTQ pride back to Concord year after year.

Speech Bubble

May 18, 2018
CREDIT FACEBOOK - ALL EYES ON UNH

In this episode, Producer Jimmy Gutierrez heads to the UNH campus to find out more about how debates over free speech are playing out on a majority white campus. Check out his earlier reporting here

Also on the show, NHPR's Annie Ropeik takes to the Crawford Trail to find out what it takes to maintain the region's oldest continuously used hiking path, and the story of how the humble potato came to North America. 

Pages