The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 7 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show, hosted by Laura Knoy.  It airs live at 9 AM and rebroadcasts at 7 PM weekdays.

Submit your questions for 2nd Congressional Candidates Annie Kuster (D) and Steven Negron (R), and tune into The Exchange live at 9 a.m. on Tuesday, October 16th to hear our forum with the candidates.

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Coming Up on The Exchange: 

Monday, 10/8 - Rebroadcast: Above & Beyond: John F. Kennedy and America's Most Dangerous Cold War Spy Mission

Tuesday, 10/9 - The Future of Natural Gas in New England

Wednesday, 10/10 -  CD1 Forum with Eddie Edwards and Chris Pappas

Thursday, 10/11 - Rebroadcast:  The White Mountain: Rediscovering Mount Washington's Hidden Culture

Friday, 10/12  -  Weekly N.H. News Roundup

Want to call in during the show or leave us a message? Here's the number: 800.892.6477 

You can also reach the show by email, by tagging us in a tweetfollowing us on Instagram, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

If you can't listen to the live show or don't live in our broadcast area, you can listen to our show online (just open the day's show post below) or subscribe to our podcast. Click here to get it on Apple Podcasts, and click here to find us on Stitcher. (Don't know how to find and listen to podcasts? Click here for a handy guide created by our friends at VPR!)

We gauge the reaction of New Hampshire politicians to the Trump/Putin summit in Helsinki. The U.S. attorney's office in New Hampshire focuses on sales of synthetic opioids, like fentanyl, in a new drug enforcement push. And the final of three Dartmouth College psychology professors facing allegations of sexual harassment and discrimination has resigned, marking the end of the formal disciplinary proceedings at the college. 

GUESTS:

Going Local: The Seacoast

Jul 18, 2018
Sara Plourde; NHPR

We look at the New Hampshire Seacoast as part of our regional series, Going Local.

With thirteen miles of ocean, a vibrant local business and arts scene, and cities and small towns that surround the beach and inland estuaries, the Seacoast is rich in culture. However, the region has faced challenges with climate change and a higher cost of living. We look at what makes this part of our state unique, and in both smaller towns like Exeter and 

Epping, and big draws like Portsmouth and Hampton.

2018 Summer Movie Show

Jul 17, 2018
Flickr, Eman Rahman

From action-packed thrillers and family-friendly animation, to heart-warming documentaries and the latest installments in several superhero franchises, summer 2018 has had a diverse movie lineup. We discuss the summer's movies so far: what we loved, what we hated, and what we think you should see. After that, we'll look ahead to the rest of the summer, and let you know what upcoming movies you won't want to miss. 

Telemedicine in N.H.

Jul 17, 2018
Courtesy of Dartmouth-Hitchcock.

Telemedicine allows health care professionals to evaluate, diagnose and treat patients at a distance using telecommunications technology.  In N.H.,  consulting a doctor through a video-chat has the potential to lower costs and help the state deal with the opioid crisis and rural healthcare shortages. Virtual house calls are limited with problematic broadband access in the state, but rural hospitals are using it to access specialized providers. We learn more about the state of telemedicine.

Call Me American: A Memoir by Abdi Nor Iftin

Jul 16, 2018

As a child in Somalia, Abdi Nor Iftin learned English by watching American action-hero films and listening to American pop stars.  His love of all things American  earned him the nickname Abdi American. But when the radical Islamist group al-Shabaab rose to power in 2006, familiarity with Western culture became something to hide.  Abdi began sending secret dispatches to NPR about worsening conditions in Somalia. After a long and arduous journey, Abdi found his way from Mogadishu to Maine, where he works as an interpreter while attending college.  

We'll talk with Abdi about his life here in the United States and about life in Somalia, one of the countries covered under the travel ban recently upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court.  Most of his family remains in Somalia. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: July 13, 2018

Jul 13, 2018

The N.H. Supreme Court decides that the voting bill defining residency/domicile, HB1264, is constitutional. Candidates for New Hampshire's First congressional district hold their first debate, amid new allegations about State Senator Andy Sanborn. State lawmakers return to Concord to figure out how tax-free New Hampshire can fend off an internet sales tax.  And Attorney General Jeff Sessions visits N.H. to discuss the opioid crisis.

Alan L. MacRae

Last week, The Exchange went to the historic Belknap Mill in Laconia to talk to a live audience about what it takes to make New Hampshire's old buildings relevant and useful for today.   

Auntjojo/Flickr

We get a New Hampshire take on two national issues.  First, your questions on President Trump's Supreme Court nominee Brett M. Kavanaugh.  A UNH constitutional law expert explains the process. Then, the ramifications of battles over trade: on New Hampshire manufacturers, consumers, workers, and our economy overall.  

Sara Plourde; NHPR

The Exchange will explore a different region of the state every Thursday starting July 12th: the Great North Woods, the White Mountains, the Lakes Region, Dartmouth/Sunapee, the Monadnock Region, the Merrimack Valley, and the Seacoast. 

We look at what makes each region distinct, the biggest issues facing that part of the state, and what people who live there love about their home. 

Feline Domestication: Science, History, and Ethics

Jul 9, 2018

The popularity of exotic cat hybrids (part domestic, part wild) raise moral questions about pet keeping. NHPR podcast Outside/In investigated the culture around this practice for a forthcoming episode of the podcast. We give you a preview, and talk about why "ethical" ownership of domestic cats means something different for different people. 

Check out the forthcoming episode of Outside/In on Thursday, July 19. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

On Friday, July 6, we do things a little differently on the Weekly New Hampshire News Roundup.

Following the tragedy at the Capital Gazette newspaper in Maryland, we focus on New Hampshire journalists and their experiences in newsrooms around the state: how they do their jobs, what they wish people knew about their profession, and how journalism has changed.  

2018 Summer Book Show

Jul 4, 2018

Whether it's for a tablet, phone, or hardback, booklovers are always on the lookout for what to read when life slows down in the summer.  We hear what's new in fiction,  including a thriller co-written by a best-selling author and a former President.  For non-fiction fans, we review new works of History, Humour and Self-Help.  And as always, some N.H. authors make the list.  Get your pen and paper ready if you are looking for help with ideas for your reading list this summer! 

pixabay/Krusha

Last week, the city of Dover became the first New Hampshire municipality to raise their smoking age from 18 to 21. The new city ordinance prohibits anyone under 21 from buying, using or possessing tobacco products, including e-cigarettes and vaping devices. We look at what kind of impact this law may have on the Dover community, and the state as a whole, and look at similar legislation in Maine and Massachusetts. 

Later in the hour, an update on marijuana legalization across New England. 

It's a golden age for podcasting, with thousands you can listen to any time, anywhere.  NHPR producers discuss the latest trends in podcasting, and give their picks for all kinds of listening, from in-depth reporting, to storytelling, to comedy, and more. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 29, 2018

Jun 29, 2018

We look at how Supreme Court decisions on union dues and a tax on internet sales may affect businesses here in the state.  More prominent Republican lawmakers are bowing out of state politics.  And, it's not too early to think about tightening up your home for winter - Eversource says rates are going up almost twenty percent. 

FLICKR

At a summit in Exeter last week, residents and EPA officials  met to discuss a class of industrial chemicals known as PFAS. It was the first of several sessions addressing concerns about these toxic substances, which have been linked to cancer, among other health problems.  In New Hampshire, these chemicals have been found at high levels at several sites, including Pease International Tradeport and the Saint Gobain plastics factory in Merrimack, prompting concern among nearby communities. State and Federal officials promised action. 

NHPR

In this Race for the 1st conversation, The Exchange talks with Bruce Crochetiere, a Republican running in the closely watched race for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District. 

Crochetiere is the founder of a technology company, Focus Technology Solutions, and resident of Hampton Falls. 

Studies have shown that reading over summer vacation keeps kids' brains active and reduces stagnation or setbacks in reading levels (known as the "summer slide"). But how often do kids and teenagers read for pleasure these days? We talk with educators, librarians and authors about why independent reading is so important, what books appeal to kids nowadays, and what strategies help encouraage kids to open a book this summer.

The Loneliness Epidemic

Jun 26, 2018
Diego Torres Silvestre; Flickr

Loneliness can have a powerful impact on our mental, physical, and social wellbeing. We look at what might be causing loneliness in children, teenagers, and adults, and what it means for our health and happiness.

Donald Hall died this weekend.  Described as "staggeringly prolific," Hall wrote books of poetry, memoirs, short stories, childrens' books, and essays.  We explore Hall's work, and listen to the poet himself from interviews over the years.

Read NHPR's tribute to Hall, and listen to interviews and events with the poet, here. 

A Review of Recent SCOTUS Rulings

Jun 24, 2018
wikipedia

It's been a busy few weeks at the U.S. Supreme Court. We'll focus on several recent decisions  addressing online business, digital privacy, religious freedom, and sports betting.  The online-sales ruling in particular has made big waves here in New Hampshire. 

NHPR

In this Race for the 1st conversation, The Exchange talks with Eddie Edwards, a Republican running in the closely watched race for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District. 

Edwards is the former chief of police for South Hampton, and served as the Chief of New Hampshire State Division of Liquor Enforcement. He is a Navy veteran and graduate of the FBI National Academy. 

Our Race for the First conversations focus on the issues at the forefront in the CD1 race, including opioids, guns, veterans, and how each candidate plans to stand out in a crowded race. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 22, 2018

Jun 22, 2018

Governor Sununu issues several vetoes, including a long-promised veto of the death penalty repeal that passed this spring. An immigration checkpoint on I 93 results in five arrests -- and more controversy.

And data released by the federal government suggests chemicals known as PFAS may be risky at lower levels than regulated by New Hampshire.

This week's Roundup is hosted by Lauren Chooljian, politics and policy reporter for NHPR's State of Democracy project.

Listen to the show:

Watch the show:

The Exchange

In this Race for the 1st conversation, The Exchange talks with Naomi Andrews, a Democrat running in the closely watched race for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District. 

Andrews is the former chief of staff for Carol Shea-Porter, and also worked as campaign manager for Porter. Andrews is a graduate of Middlebury College, and has a law degree from the University of Richmond. 

Our Race for the First conversations focus on the issues at the forefront in the CD1 race, including opioids, guns, veterans, and how each candidate plans to stand out in a crowded race. 

What's Happening to New Hampshire's Honey Bees?

Jun 20, 2018

Scientists and beekeepers are trying to find out why almost 60% of honey bee hives died out last winter, and even more the winter before.  

wikimedia commons

This smoking alternative is sweeping schools nationwide and causing concern.  JUULs are small and easy to hide; they look like a flash drive and come in delicious-smelling flavors.  But manufacturers say their product is squarely aimed at adult smokers, to help them quit.  We look at the arguments. 

This is a rebroadcast of a show that originally aired live on April 25, 2018. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Former state senator Molly Kelly explains why she's running for governor and addresses the big issues facing the state, including the opioid epidemic, public education funding, and New Hampshire's energy future.

Kelly is running against former Portsmouth mayor Steve Marchand in the Democratic primary.  The winner will face Governor Chris Sununu. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

In this Race for the 1st conversation, Laura talks with Andy Sanborn, a Republican running in the closely watched race for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District. 

Sanborn is a state senator and current chairman of the Senate Ways and Means and Election Law & Internal Affairs committees. 

Our Race for the First conversations will focus on the issues at the forefront in the CD1 race, including opioids, guns, veterans, and how each candidate plans to stand out in a crowded race. 

Creative Commons

Since moving into the state in 2013, the invasive Emerald Ash Borer has been diminishing local ash tree poplations. Now, New Hampshire's forrests face a threat from another non-native insect: The Southern Pine Beetle. On Monday, June 18, the Exchange discusses the these two wood-boring beetles and their impact on New Hampshire, how they got here, and what we can do to fight back.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 15, 2018

Jun 15, 2018

The state parole board wrestles with public access to hearings.  A V.A. task force issues recommendations for improving N.H. veterans' health care.  And several property-poor districts consider suing the state over its education-funding mechanism.     

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