The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 7 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show, hosted by Laura Knoy.  It airs live at 9 AM and rebroadcasts at 7 PM weekdays.

Coming Up on The Exchange: 

Monday, 9/24 - Taking a Toll: NHPR's Series on the Impact of the Drug Crisis on Children

Tuesday, 9/25 -  School Safety

Wednesday, 9/26 - Self-Driving and Autonomous Technology

Thursday, 9/27 -  Eliza Hamilton 

Friday, 9/28  -  Weekly N.H. News Roundup

Want to call in during the show or leave us a message? Here's the number: 800.892.6477 

You can also reach the show by email, by tagging us in a tweetfollowing us on Instagram, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

If you can't listen to the live show or don't live in our broadcast area, you can listen to our show online (just open the day's show post below) or subscribe to our podcast. Click here to get it on Apple Podcasts, and click here to find us on Stitcher. (Don't know how to find and listen to podcasts? Click here for a handy guide created by our friends at VPR!)

It's a golden age for podcasting, with thousands you can listen to any time, anywhere.  NHPR producers discuss the latest trends in podcasting, and give their picks for all kinds of listening, from in-depth reporting, to storytelling, to comedy, and more. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 29, 2018

Jun 29, 2018

We look at how Supreme Court decisions on union dues and a tax on internet sales may affect businesses here in the state.  More prominent Republican lawmakers are bowing out of state politics.  And, it's not too early to think about tightening up your home for winter - Eversource says rates are going up almost twenty percent. 

FLICKR

At a summit in Exeter last week, residents and EPA officials  met to discuss a class of industrial chemicals known as PFAS. It was the first of several sessions addressing concerns about these toxic substances, which have been linked to cancer, among other health problems.  In New Hampshire, these chemicals have been found at high levels at several sites, including Pease International Tradeport and the Saint Gobain plastics factory in Merrimack, prompting concern among nearby communities. State and Federal officials promised action. 

NHPR

In this Race for the 1st conversation, The Exchange talks with Bruce Crochetiere, a Republican running in the closely watched race for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District. 

Crochetiere is the founder of a technology company, Focus Technology Solutions, and resident of Hampton Falls. 

Studies have shown that reading over summer vacation keeps kids' brains active and reduces stagnation or setbacks in reading levels (known as the "summer slide"). But how often do kids and teenagers read for pleasure these days? We talk with educators, librarians and authors about why independent reading is so important, what books appeal to kids nowadays, and what strategies help encouraage kids to open a book this summer.

The Loneliness Epidemic

Jun 26, 2018
Diego Torres Silvestre; Flickr

Loneliness can have a powerful impact on our mental, physical, and social wellbeing. We look at what might be causing loneliness in children, teenagers, and adults, and what it means for our health and happiness.

Donald Hall died this weekend.  Described as "staggeringly prolific," Hall wrote books of poetry, memoirs, short stories, childrens' books, and essays.  We explore Hall's work, and listen to the poet himself from interviews over the years.

Read NHPR's tribute to Hall, and listen to interviews and events with the poet, here. 

A Review of Recent SCOTUS Rulings

Jun 24, 2018
wikipedia

It's been a busy few weeks at the U.S. Supreme Court. We'll focus on several recent decisions  addressing online business, digital privacy, religious freedom, and sports betting.  The online-sales ruling in particular has made big waves here in New Hampshire. 

NHPR

In this Race for the 1st conversation, The Exchange talks with Eddie Edwards, a Republican running in the closely watched race for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District. 

Edwards is the former chief of police for South Hampton, and served as the Chief of New Hampshire State Division of Liquor Enforcement. He is a Navy veteran and graduate of the FBI National Academy. 

Our Race for the First conversations focus on the issues at the forefront in the CD1 race, including opioids, guns, veterans, and how each candidate plans to stand out in a crowded race. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 22, 2018

Jun 22, 2018

Governor Sununu issues several vetoes, including a long-promised veto of the death penalty repeal that passed this spring. An immigration checkpoint on I 93 results in five arrests -- and more controversy.

And data released by the federal government suggests chemicals known as PFAS may be risky at lower levels than regulated by New Hampshire.

This week's Roundup is hosted by Lauren Chooljian, politics and policy reporter for NHPR's State of Democracy project.

Listen to the show:

Watch the show:

The Exchange

In this Race for the 1st conversation, The Exchange talks with Naomi Andrews, a Democrat running in the closely watched race for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District. 

Andrews is the former chief of staff for Carol Shea-Porter, and also worked as campaign manager for Porter. Andrews is a graduate of Middlebury College, and has a law degree from the University of Richmond. 

Our Race for the First conversations focus on the issues at the forefront in the CD1 race, including opioids, guns, veterans, and how each candidate plans to stand out in a crowded race. 

What's Happening to New Hampshire's Honey Bees?

Jun 20, 2018

Scientists and beekeepers are trying to find out why almost 60% of honey bee hives died out last winter, and even more the winter before.  

wikimedia commons

This smoking alternative is sweeping schools nationwide and causing concern.  JUULs are small and easy to hide; they look like a flash drive and come in delicious-smelling flavors.  But manufacturers say their product is squarely aimed at adult smokers, to help them quit.  We look at the arguments. 

This is a rebroadcast of a show that originally aired live on April 25, 2018. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Former state senator Molly Kelly explains why she's running for governor and addresses the big issues facing the state, including the opioid epidemic, public education funding, and New Hampshire's energy future.

Kelly is running against former Portsmouth mayor Steve Marchand in the Democratic primary.  The winner will face Governor Chris Sununu. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

In this Race for the 1st conversation, Laura talks with Andy Sanborn, a Republican running in the closely watched race for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District. 

Sanborn is a state senator and current chairman of the Senate Ways and Means and Election Law & Internal Affairs committees. 

Our Race for the First conversations will focus on the issues at the forefront in the CD1 race, including opioids, guns, veterans, and how each candidate plans to stand out in a crowded race. 

Creative Commons

Since moving into the state in 2013, the invasive Emerald Ash Borer has been diminishing local ash tree poplations. Now, New Hampshire's forrests face a threat from another non-native insect: The Southern Pine Beetle. On Monday, June 18, the Exchange discusses the these two wood-boring beetles and their impact on New Hampshire, how they got here, and what we can do to fight back.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 15, 2018

Jun 15, 2018

The state parole board wrestles with public access to hearings.  A V.A. task force issues recommendations for improving N.H. veterans' health care.  And several property-poor districts consider suing the state over its education-funding mechanism.     

CCO Public Domain

Several high-profile suicides have been the focus of a national conversation, and recent numbers show that the rate in New Hampshire is up nearly 50 percent over the past 20 years. The Exchange on Thursday, June 14, will examine what's causing this rise in suicide deaths, and how N.H. is approaching this difficult topic. 

On Thursday, June 14, we're discussing suicide in New Hampshire and efforts underway to prevent it.

Suicide rates were up 48.3 percent from 1999 - 2016 in the Granite State, according to a recent report from the CDC.  We'll examine what might be contributing to this, as well as the latest thinking on how to discuss and prevent suicide.  Submit your questions below. 

Mental health professionals urge people suffering from suicidal thoughts to seek help by contacting the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, which is available 24 hours a day at (800) 273-8255.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

New Hampshire Department of Corrections Commissioner Helen Hanks says only patients whose mental illness drives them to extreme violence end up in the state prison’s secure psychiatric unit, and it’s a small group -- on average occupying about 10 of the unit’s 66 beds every year.  

DCist Photos

How are tariffs and international trade disputes impacting our state? We also take a look at summer employment, including the shortage of workers. And, how do large companies mergers impact the little guys?

NHPR File Photo

It's been called one of the toughest jobs in the state: Commissioner of the Department of Corrections. Since last November, Helen Hanks has held the position, overseeing three prisons, probation offices, and transitional housing units.  Also on her watch:  The opening of a new women's prison after a long legal battle over equal treatment for female prisoners, and protests over the practice of housing non-criminal patients in the state prison's secure psychiatric unit.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

In this Race for the 1st conversation, The Exchange talks with Maura Sullivan, a Democrat running in the closely watched race for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District. 

Sullivan is a Marine who was born in Illinois and moved to New Hampshire after serving as Assistant Secretary at the Department of Veterans Affairs, among other postings, for the Obama administration. 

NH DHHS

New Hampshire residents have long known the risks of contracting diseases like Lyme and West Nile from a tick or mosquito bite, but a recent report from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says there’s even more to worry about.

The CDC is now tracking 16 of these “vector-borne diseases” and says the number of cases has tripled between 2004 and 2016.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 8, 2018

Jun 7, 2018

We look at the public feud between the largest state employees union and the top managers of the New Hampshire Liquor Commission.  Are state liquor store employees at risk in high-volume cash sales?  Lakes Region residents consider possible future plans for the former Laconia State School.   And what to do with the troublesome bear pardoned by Governor Sununu last year, now rummaging again in backyards in the Upper Valley.

GUESTS:

New research shows that illnesses carried by ticks and mosquitos are on the rise. We talk about why these creatures are carrying more disease, and what you need to know about illnesses such as Lyme, babesiosis, and Zika.

 

The NFL Kneeling Ban And The First Amendment

Jun 6, 2018
By Keith Allison from Hanover, MD / Wikimedia Commons

The National Football League recently announced a new policy requiring players to stand during the national anthem or stay in the locker room. Earlier this week, President Donald Trump called off a visit by the Philadelphia Eagles to the White House, citing the dispute over the NFL kneeling ban. We check out issues of constitutionality and find out how players and owners are reacting. 

Annie Roepik/NHPR

Neighbors at the Coakley Landfill Superfund site in Greenland met privately with top EPA officials on Monday to discuss a long-standing concern: high levels of potentially toxic PFAS chemicals in a brook that runs alongside the landfill. 

Local residents handed New England EPA Administrator Alexandra Dunn a petition asking the agency to compell the group responnsible for the site's contamination to take several actions, including expanding testing of residential wells and installing water filters at homes and schools around the landfill. 

We get an update on the Coakley site, as well as other areas dealing with drinking-water contamination, from NHPR's Energy and Environment reporter Annie Ropeik. 

NHPR File Photo

The opioid crisis has forced physicians to rethink their prescribing practices, and many are providing fewer opioid prescriptions, potentially leaving some patients without proper pain management.

Tighter regulations and insurance requirements have reduced overprescribing, but many say this makes it difficult for patients with both acute and chronic pain to find the help they need.

U.S. Air Force

  

A recent study found that New Hampshire reduced opioid prescriptions by 15% last year, the largest drop in the country.  How have physicians changed how they prescribe opiods in acute, and chronic care settings?

Pages