Peter Biello

Host, All Things Considered

Peter Biello is the host of All Things Considered at New Hampshire Public Radio. He has served as a producer and host of Weekend Edition Saturday at Vermont Public Radio and as a reporter/host of Morning Edition at WHQR in Wilmington, North Carolina.

Peter has won several AP awards for his journalism, which has appeared on NPR’s All Things Considered and This American Life. He’s also a fiction writer whose work appears or is forthcoming in Gargoyle, Lowestoft Chronicle, Green Writers Press, and South85 Journal. He’s also the founder of Burlington Writers Workshop, a nonprofit writing workshop based in Burlington, Vermont, and co-founder of Mud Season Review, a literary journal featuring fiction, nonfiction, poetry and visual art that publishes in print annually and online monthly.

Peter lives in Concord, New Hampshire. 

Ways to Connect

The New Hampshire Legislature's joint task force on opioid and heroin abuse worked through December to discuss the state's growing drug epidemic. Those recommendations have been sent to the governor and public leaders, and they'll start going through a public hearing process in the legislature next week.

Joining NHPR to talk about what the task force concluded is Senator Jeb Bradley. He served as chair of the task force.

The recommendations your forwarded fell into a few different priority levels. Can you spell them out for us?

AP

While campaigning at New England College today, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders spoke of student debt and other domestic policies. His proposals include providing health care for all Americans and free tuition at public colleges. But how will these be paid for? Sen. Sanders spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello about this policy idea, and much more. 

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Right now Santa and his elves are working hard to build presents in time for Christmas. To build toys for all the good boys and girls on the nice list, how big would Santa’s workshop actually have to be? Granite Geek David Brooks did some "research" on this very question. He writes for The Concord Monitor and GraniteGeek.org. He spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello.

David, unfortunately you were not given a tour of Santa's workshop, so you just have to take some educated guesses, right?

Brady Carlson / NHPR

South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham ended his presidential campaign this morning. A well-known voice in Republican foreign policy debates, and a frequent visitor to New Hampshire, Graham failed to catch on with voters here. NHPR’s Senior Editor for Politics Dan Barrick spoke with All Things Considered Host Peter Biello, to look back on Graham’s short-lived White House bid.

Hanibaael via Flickr Creative Commons

The Department of Veterans Affairs has been trying to end veteran homelessness by the end of this year. The goal was to achieve and sustain something called “functional zero,” which doesn’t eliminate homelessness, but rather ensures that it’s rare, brief and non-recurring.

Photo courtesy of the NH Dept. of Fish & Game

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Premshee Pillai via Flickr Creative Commons

You’ve heard of a megawatt, a unit of electricity that represents a million watts, or, in other words, enough electricity to power about 1-thousand homes. But you may not have heard of the nega-watt—that’s nega with an “n.” The nega-watt is a term used to describe what happens when businesses are paid to reduce their need for electricity. That, in turn, reduces strain on the grid, and in theory is a good idea to those who want to save the environment.

NuDay Syria

Since last month’s terror attacks in Paris and last week’s mass shooting in San Bernardino, California, the issues of Syrian refugees and radical Islam has risen to the top of the national political  agenda. Presidential candidate Donald Trump in particular has singled out Muslims as potentially dangerous. President Obama recently called on Americans to respect Muslims and separate the vast majority of them from the relatively small number of Islamic radicals.

But are people in New Hampshire answering the president’s call? Nadia Alawa, the founder and president of NuDay Syria, a local nonprofit that focuses on empowerment and help with dignity to Syria's mothers and children, spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello. 

Courtesy / Veterans Administration

A mobile clinic for veterans in the North Country has seen a few dozen patients since it opened in late October.  The clinic is set up in the parking lot of the Androscoggin Valley Hospital in Berlin.  A doctor and nurse team there have been able to give out flu shots and other treatments. VA spokesman Rick Salgueiro says there are about 1,000 veterans in the Berlin area who could possibly avoid a long trip to the VA hospital in White River Junction, Vermont.  "We wanted to rapidly deploy primary care into the Berlin area based on what veterans are communicating they want," he says.

Peter Biello / NHPR

The City of Concord approved Wednesday Concord Craft Brewing Company’s request to put in a microbrewery and tasting room in the city’s newly renovated downtown. That part of the city can be heated with steam, and that, says brewery owner Dennis Molnar, is a huge advantage when it comes to making beer. 

"So that’s where the steam comes in for this part of the building," Molnar says as he shows off a closet filled with pipes in the back of what will be a beer production room. He says the steam from those pipes will reduce the risk of burning the beer as it brews.

Every four years, New Hampshire Primary candidates and their supporters buy up hours of commercial time on local TV in hopes of attracting potential voters.

But, this year, all the advertising has not translated into more support, especially on the Republican side.

NHPR’s digital reporter Brian Wallstin has been tracking the primary-ad war and he’s giving NHPR's All Things Considered the lay of the land.

So, here we are – a little more than two months before the primary. Are viewers sick of all the political ads yet?

Jomegat / Wikimedia Commons

Evolving technology can sometimes make the things we use outmoded. For example: when’s the last time you’ve dragged your typewriter to work? But then again, typewriters are still useful at town clerk’s offices for some paperwork. One company in Boscawen still manufactures leather industrial products like belts and straps that aren’t used as often as they once were, but are still tremendously important to the businesses that need them. For more on Page Belting Company, we turn to David Brooks.

Kevin Ouellette

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Courtesy VA

The Veterans Administration Hospital system in Phoenix was the epicenter of the VA scandal that surfaced in 2014.

The director of the Veterans Administration Hospital in White River Junction, Vermont is has been assigned to the Phoenix, Arizona VA Health Care System.

Deborah Amdur will take over as leader in Phoenix on December 13th.

Phoenix VA hospitals made headlines in 2014 when it was discovered that VA staff manipulated records to show that wait times for care were shorter than they actually were.

Peter Biello / NHPR

All this week we’ve been hearing about programs that help veterans who are struggling with PTSD or TBI.  But before these programs can work—veterans who need help actually need to ask for it.  But we know that’s a barrier to getting healthcare.

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Peter Biello / NHPR

Veterans’ justice programs are popping up all over the country, and just last year, New Hampshire got its first one, in Nashua. These alternative justice programs are courts that allow veterans to get a handle on problems such as post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and alcohol or drug abuse that put them at odds with the law.

Peter Biello / NHPR

Thirty-five year old Navy veteran Zech Anderson shifts gears on a mountain bike and glides down a leaf-littered path. He’s riding through the woods near UNH with a fellow veteran, Lou Fladger. Anderson’s been down this trail before.


File Photo / NHPR

Senator Jeanne Shaheen has reintroduced a bill that requires random audits of Veterans Health Administration hospitals.

This follows reports released in October by the Inspector General that show VA hospitals in Alaska, California, and Illinois are still delaying veterans’ care. 

The bill is called the Veterans Scheduling Accountability Act. Shaheen says these audits are designed to make sure veterans receive care in a timely manner.

Public Domain / NASA

We’re going far out into space for this next conversation, beyond what’s called the heliosphere. That’s the protective bubble that the sun creates by giving off something called solar wind. To give you an idea of how big the heliosphere is—it extends beyond Pluto. NASA’s Voyager 1 broke through the heliosphere a few years ago, but the magnetic field data that it gathered didn’t match what scientists expected to find.   

Manchester Mayor Ted Gatsas

Manchester's mayoral election is tomorrow. Incumbent Ted Gatsas faces challenger Joyce Craig. This morning on Morning Edition we heard from Craig about her approach to a variety of issues at stake in this election. All Things Considered host Peter Biello spoke with Gatsas.

Jason Meserve, NHPR

An NHPR interview with Congressman Frank Guinta.

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Flikr Creative Commons / BiologyCorner

New numbers released by the College Board show that for every New Hampshire girl who took the AP or “Advanced Placement” exam in computer science, more than 7 boys took it. It’s just one example of the gender divide in fields of study in New Hampshire. David Brooks, a reporter for The Concord Monitor and writer at Granitegeek.org, spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello. 

That number is huge. More than seven boys, actually 7.47 boys, for every one girl taking the AP computer science exam. Is this surprising to you?

JonJon2k8 via Flickr Creative Commons

This far into the campaign season, polls are generating lots of headlines. And if you live in New Hampshire, polling firms have likely been calling you and hundreds of other Granite Staters. But how do those polling firms find you? How do they choose their questions, and what do they do with your information?  For more on this, we turn to David Brooks who’s a reporter with The Concord Monitor, writer at GraniteGeek.org, and he’s moderating a Science Café panel discussion about this very subject Wednesday, October 21st at 6 p.m.

Allison Quantz for NHPR

The holiday season is fast approaching, and coming along with it is the stress associated with making travel plans or preparing big meals for family gatherings. That stress could take a toll on your body as well as your mind. It could cause back pain, insomnia and stomach problems, just to name a few.

We know that rest is a good way to cut down some of these problems. But now a new study demonstrates that relaxation programs could reduce your medical bills as well. 

These days lotteries are everywhere. Walk into most convenience stores and you’ll see scratch tickets on sale. Big Powerball payouts stretching across state lines make headlines, but fifty years ago the idea that lotteries were sinful and contributed to society’s moral decay was more widespread than it is today.

You may be surprised to learn that in the 1960s New Hampshire was the first state to launch a legal lottery. It came after a fight involving politicians of opposing sides, religious moralists, mob members, and the FBI.

Dale Van Cor / Rockethub.com

Sometimes it's the most basic of technologies that stand the test of time. Take the simple screw. It’s a bit of metal with threads spiraling down a shaft, and yet it holds together most of the products and tools we use every day. But one New Hampshire inventor is challenging that time-honored design. David Brooks, a reporter for the Concord Monitor and writer at GraniteGeek.org, spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello. 

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