Leila Goldstein

Intern - All Things Considered

Leila Goldstein is graduate of the radio program at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies. She has produced stories about sudden deportation orders in New Hampshire, interfaith protests at ICE offices, and the competitive world of food vendors at the county fair.

She’s lived in many parts of the world, including the Czech Republic and Japan. For two years she taught in Indonesia as a Shansi Fellow, and organized screenings and events for the local film organization Aceh Documentary.

She’s taught storytelling at Cleveland Public Theater, Girls in Motion, the International Humanity Foundation, and Syiah Kuala University. This summer, Leila will focus on producing segments for NHPR’s All Things Considered.

Peter Biello/NHPR

This week, the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester is welcoming art-lovers to its gallery for a new show. Boston-based artist and Tufts Professor Ethan Murrow has created wall drawings and a sculpture honoring Manchester's working class roots. Last week, ahead of the show's opening, he and a team of art students put the finishing touches on the drawings.

[Editor’s note: We highly recommend listening to this story.]

Leila Goldstein / NHPR

If you close your eyes you wouldn't know it was a sleepy Sunday morning here in Salem at the back of "Coffee Coffee," an organic coffee house. Luke Moss squints, smiles and nods as he taps out a bead on his snare. He signals directions to his bandmates: a guitarist, a bassist, and a sax player.

Above him is a big, yellow sign reading Live Music.

Dan Houde/Wiseguy Creative via Pinterest

According to U.S. census data, New Hampshire has the second-oldest population in terms of median age. Over the past month and a half, 10 New Hampshire towns have been accepted into the AARP Network of Age Friendly Communities. As part of the network, these towns are making a commitment to making their communities more age-friendly.

Leila Goldstein/NHPR

Senator Jeanne Shaheen was in Concord today where she addressed Russian interference in U.S. elections. She spoke at a New Hampshire Business and Industry Association luncheon.

She said, while she was pleased to hear yesterday's federal briefing about the threats, she was disappointed by President Trump's contradictory remarks at a rally later in the day.

"This is real folks. And we need to make sure that we have people who are in charge who are addressing it. And we need the president to stop undermining the efforts to do something about this threat," she said. 

Peter Biello / NHPR

The Summer Music Series swings through the Mount Washington Valley this week to visit the only music shop in New Hampshire that builds steel drums, the national instrument of Trinidad and Tobago.

After a listener wrote us about it, NHPR’s Leila Goldstein visited the shop, Maccabee Panworks, in Conway.


Via Wikimedia Commons

  

Thursday was the court-ordered deadline for border authorities to reunite families separated at the U.S.-Mexico border. A Keene woman whose sister-in-law and nephew were separated says they've now been reunited, but the reunification comes without answers to key questions.

Why were they cleared for reunification while others still wait in detention centers? Why were they not deported back to Honduras? And how long can they stay? 

YVONNE DE JONG & THOMAS BUTYNSKI

 

In the book The Lorax, by Dr. Seuss, a furry creature named the Lorax speaks up for the Truffula trees as they are being cut down. The character of the Lorax is generally seen as an outraged, even bossy spokesperson for the environment. But new research at Dartmouth suggests a different interpretation, in which the Lorax is actually part of the environment. Researchers believe the Lorax was inspired by real monkeys the author saw on a trip to Kenya in 1970.

Courtesy of U.S. Customs and Border Protection

The ACLU of New Hampshire held a Know Your Rights training in Concord Thursday night. The training was in response to the immigration checkpoints conducted by U.S. Customs and Border Protection along I-93.

Leila Goldstein/NHPR

At a naturalization ceremony Wednesday at the Strawbery Banke Museum in Portsmouth, 103 people from 49 countries became U.S. citizens.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Headquarters, via Wikimedia Commons. Photo by Matthew Strausser.

Biologists from New Hampshire's Fish and Game Department rescued a moose calf Thursday in Keene after its mother was struck by a motorist earlier in the day. The two were seen together on Wednesday around Keene, but then became separated.

In a video posted online by the Keene Sentinel, the adult moose can be seen running past an AutoZone on Key Road. Another video shows the calf walking around an apartment parking lot on Ivy Drive.

Leila Goldstein/NHPR

Community members and police officers met last night in Concord to share their perspectives in an event called Concord Blue and You.

The American Friends Service Committee and Change for Concord put on the event in collaboration with New Hampshire Listens, an initiative of the University of New Hampshire.

Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

People in New Hampshire have been reacting to the news of President Trump ending the family separation policy at the border. NHPR’s Leila Goldstein gathered some voices in Concord earlier Wednesday before the executive order was signed.

Leila Goldstein/NHPR

Imane Naji Amrani is in total party planner mode. She wears a pink dress and matching pink headscarf. Focused and firm, she tells a group of teenage helpers where food should go and hurries to get everything done before sunset.

Every night for the month of Ramadan, families at the mosque in Manchester take turns cooking for the Iftar, the evening meal where Muslims break their fast each night during Ramadan. Tonight is Naji Amrani’s night to cook.