News

josh rogers / nhpr

 

 

Democratic candidates for governor Molly Kelly and Steve Marchand are working to stoke support -- and pounding core messages -- in advance of Tuesday's primary.

NOAA

 

Tropical Storm Florence turned into a hurricane Sunday morning and swirled toward the U.S. for what forecasters said could be a direct hit on the Southeast toward the end of the week.

The storm's sustained winds reached 75 mph (121 kph), just over the threshold for a hurricane, as it made its way across the Atlantic, about 750 miles (1,210 kilometers) southeast of Bermuda, the National Hurricane Center said. It was moving west at 6 mph.

20/20

 

A New Hampshire teenager who was abducted, imprisoned and sexually assaulted nearly five years ago says she can't believe she's alive.

Abby Hernandez spoke to ABC's "20/20" in an interview that aired Friday night.

Manchester PD

Manchester police issued an arrest warrant for a man accused of committing a fatal shooting on Hanover Street on Friday.

Manchester Police Chief Carlo Capano and Attorney General Gordon MacDonald identified the shooter as 26-year-old Paul Dimick. They said he shot Justin Lee, 32, who later died at the Elliot Hospital.  

Dimick is described as a white male, 5'6", with blonde hair and blue eyes. Police say he is considered armed and dangerous.

The shooting led to Central High School being on lockdown for hours. 

 

Republicans competing for a chance to take on Democratic Rep. Annie Kuster in New Hampshire's 2nd Congressional District unanimously praised President Donald Trump but differed a bit on immigration, abortion and other issues in a televised debate four days before their primary.

If optics is everything in political campaigns, it was fitting to see Eddie Edwards and Andy Sanborn at far ends of the debate stage.

Gov. Chris Sununu/Twitter

For the Democratic candidates running for New Hampshire governor, it’s crunch time. All week long Steve Marchand and Molly Kelly have worked to get attention from voters and the press. Between now and Tuesday, that hustling will be almost non-stop.

For Republican Gov. Chris Sununu, who is running for reelection but doesn’t face a primary, the political pace is decidedly less frantic. Incumbency helps, but so does Sununu’s personality. 

 

State of N.H.

State officials are proposing changing their strategy for slowing the spread of the invasive emerald ash borer.

The destructive beetle arrived in New Hampshire in 2013 and has now entered seven counties, including Carroll and Grafton, where the majority of the state's ash trees grow.

Ash makes up about 6 percent of the state’s hardwood forests, netting at least $1 million for the forest products industry every year.

With just a few days left of primary campaigning, supporters of Republican congressional candidate Eddie Edwards continue to target Andy Sanborn’s character.

Today, two state senators - Regina Birdsell of Hampstead and Sharon Carson of Londonderry - endorsed Edwards. They praised Edwards for his conservatism, and warned that Andy Sanborn's alleged behavior toward staffers would haunt him in a general election.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

Hope for New Hampshire – an operator of drug recovery centers that received $600,000 in last-minute state funds this spring to maintain two locations outside its base in Manchester – has now closed one of those locations, in Franklin.

The weekend has arrived, so go ahead and make the most of it. Here are 5 things to do in New Hampshire, plus a little extra because, well, you deserve some fun.

Check out the NHPR community calendar for more ideas - and submit your own events.

Peter Biello / NHPR

All this summer we've been hearing from Granite State musicians about their signature sounds. Today we'll hear from singer/songwriter Chelsea Paolini. The Brentwood native has been playing in bands since the age of 14. You may have heard her as the frontwoman for the band People Skills. Most recently she's been experimenting with her solo sound. Chelsea Paolini spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello. 

Daniela Allee / NHPR

About 15 people in Concord learned how to use voting technology for the visually impaired at FutureInSight, a local non-profit.

The system, called One4All, was first used in the 2016 state primary.

It's tablet-based. There's a keyboard and voice output that reads through the candidates. Voters hit "enter" on a keyboard to pick their candidate.

This year's system has a few small tweaks: the voice output is clearer and a bit faster, for one thing.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Construction on Amtrak’s Downeaster rail line will interrupt service for the next several weeks.

Fewer trains will run weekdays as Amtrak makes track improvements between Brunswick, Maine, and Dover, New Hampshire. Passengers can expect to complete some sections of the route via shuttle bus.

The Northern New England Passenger Rail Authority, which operates the Downeaster, says most fares have been reduced for impacted passengers during the construction period.

There is no planned reduction in weekend train trips, but riders will face construction delays.

Via Plymouth State web site

Plymouth State University will hold a conference Saturday to raise awareness about human trafficking.

 

"Even the victims themselves oftentimes don't recognize themselves as victims,” said Stephanie Halter, associate professor of criminal justice at Plymouth State University, member of the N.H. Human Trafficking Collaborative Task Force. “So it's kind of helping people understand what this really looks like and helping them see this as a crime."

Manchester Police

  

Manchester police arrested and charged a city man with three counts of attempted murder after an officer-involved shooting Thursday night.

Police said 29-year-old Justin McInnes, who was wanted on several warrants, began to flee and got into a car and accelerated toward officers outside an apartment building on the West Side. Officers fired at the vehicle and narrowly escaped getting hit, police said. Officers apprehended him nearby when the car failed or broke down.

 

WMUR Debate

New Hampshire voters got a chance last night to check out the Republican side of the 1st Congressional District race during the candidates' only televised debate. There were some surprising performances, a little fighting but mostly the five Republican candidates focused on the issues. NHPR's Lauren Chooljian is back with us this morning to breakdown last night's WMUR debate.  

(This transcript was lightly edited.)  

OK. so quickly remind us, who was on stage last night.

Flickr Creative Commons | Mark Moschell

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Hundreds of people from the timber and renewable energy industries crowded the New Hampshire State House lawn Thursday, rallying for legislators to overturn two vetoes they say could put them out of business.

The Claremont school board voted Wednesday to allow a needle exchange program to operate at Valley Regional Hospital. The program needed board sign-off because of the hospital’s proximity to a local elementary zone.

Students at Dartmouth’s medical school will staff the exchange, which will likely open this fall or winter, said Valley Regional CEO Peter Wright.

It’s one of only a handful of programs to crop up across the state since New Hampshire legalized needle exchanges in 2017 in an effort to reduce the spread of infectious disease.

WMUR

The 11 Democrats running to replace Rep. Carol Shea-Porter in the 1st Congressional District tried their best to stand out during a televised debate Wednesday, using their fleeting time on stage to prove to voters that they’re the most progressive candidate and best able to take on President Donald Trump’s agenda.

Taylor Quimby

About a mile from downtown North Conway is a house. A sign out front says, “Residents Only.” An old silver camping trailer sits off to one side, half buried by tall grass and weeds. A half-dozen bikes are parked in the driveway.

Inside, it’s dark and smells strongly of mildew.

Fernando, who is just about to turn 21, is leaning forward, his elbows on his knees. He and four others sit around a coffee table, laughing awkwardly about the radio reporter who knocked on their door just a few minutes ago.

U.S. ICE

  Dozens of Christian Indonesians challenging deportation orders issued last year have reached a milestone in their legal battle.

 

Yesterday, 44 of a total 51 individuals named in a class action suit from last year received notice that the U.S. Department of Justice would grant motions to reopen their asylum cases.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 7, 2018

Sep 6, 2018

We take a look at this final week of debates, forums, and politicking before next Tuesday's primary. In Massachusetts it's being called a political earthquake - do historic victories in primaries there have ramifications for New Hampshire races?  And the Red Sox add a shimmy to the lineup.

GUESTS:

Bryan Pocius / Flickr Creative Commons

U.S. Customs and Border Protection has been running checkpoints in New Hampshire more frequently under the Trump administration, setting up on Interstate 93 near the small towns of Woodstock and Lincoln.

The stated goal of these stops is enforcing immigration law, and to that end, they have been fairly successful. Agents have arrested more than 50 people over the past two years who they determined to be in the country illegally. 

But those in support of the stops are often quick to turn attention to a topic other than immigration: drugs and the state’s opioid crisis.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The fight to overturn two energy bill vetoes will come to the State House today with a demonstration.

The timber industry and renewable energy supporters have teamed up to urge legislators to override Gov. Chris Sununu's vetoes. One would subsidize the biomass power industry, while the other would expand net metering in New Hampshire.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Since the 1970s, every candidate running for governor—or any other major office in New Hampshire—has faced the question: will they pledge to oppose a broad-based sales or income tax?

This year, some prominent Democrats say it is long past time to stop taking what is known as The Pledge. But its political pull remains strong.

To understand how the pledge continues to shape—and some might say warp—politics within the New Hampshire Democratic Party, consider this recent exchange between the party’s two gubernatorial candidates at Dartmouth College.

Manchester School District

Teachers in Manchester headed back to work on Wednesday without a new contract.

The teachers' union has been at an impasse with the school board since June.

The sticking point is salary increases.

Sue Hannan, president of the Manchester Education Association, says that in March, the union submitted a proposal that would put Manchester salaries on par with districts in New Hampshire with good teacher pay. Hannan says it would have cost the city an additional $28 million over the course of three years.

Via audio-luci | Flickr Creative Commons

In the 1990s, a string of New Hampshire Supreme Court cases established the state's responsibility to fund an "adequate" education. These days, however, an adequate education is funded primarily by local property taxes, and rates vary from town to town. John Tobin is part of the team leading a charge to pressure the state to pay more of that bill. He is former executive director of New Hampshire Legal Assistance and he represented the plaintiffs in the Claremont Supreme Court cases. Now he is leading education funding forums around the state. NHPR’s Peter Biello spoke with Tobin about his efforts.

Berlin School District

The city of Berlin and its school district will host a forum Thursday that explains how the state funds public education.

They're calling it: "Save Our Schools: Save Education Funding Now."

Executive Councilor Andru Volinsky and lawyer John Tobin have led three of these forums in other property-poor towns around the state.

The pair were lawyers in the original lawsuits against the state for adequate school funding more than two decades ago.

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