News

More than 300 news outlets across the country published editorials today denouncing President Trump's attacks on the media. Several New Hampshire publications participated in the campaign, which was lead by the Boston Globe's Opinion Page Editor. 

Since taking office, the President has called journalists "crooked," the "enemy of the people," and, of course, "fake." 

"What he refers to as fake news isn't fake at all," said Dana Wormold, Editor of the Concord Monitor's opinion page. "It's news reports that he's uncomfortable with for whatever reason." 

A North Country Democrat is mounting a write-in campaign to challenge State Senator Jeff Woodburn, who is seeking reelection as he faces multiple misdemeanor domestic violence and assault changes. 

Kathleen Kelley says her positions on issues don't differ much from Woodburn, and that if elected she'd fight for more resources for the North Country -- for schools, for health care and to improve economic opportunity. Kelley says Senate District 1 needs representation that is beyond reproach.

JIM RICHMOND VIA FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission says they found no problems with the response to cracks in concrete at Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant during a recent inspection.

Their new report is another step forward in the power plant's bid to get its license renewed.

As part of a series of interviews with GOP candidates in the 2nd Congressional District primary, we sit down with Robert Burns.

Robert Burns is a former Hillsborough County treasurer, and served as National Youth Coalition chairman for Donald Trump in the 2016 election. He is a lifelong New Hampshire resident, currently residing in Bedford. 

This conversation will air on Friday, August 17 live at 9:40 a.m., and again at 7:40 p.m.

Photo Courtesy Waterville Valley Resort

The International Ski Federation has selected New Hampshire's Waterville Valley Resort to host U.S. Alpine ski championships in 2019 and 2021.

 

The resort hosted the World Cup in 1991. But Waterville says this winter's championship could draw an even larger crowd, with Olympic gold medalists Lindsey Vonn and Mikaela Shiffrin expected to compete.

 

Governor Sununu's Council on Diversity and Inclusion held its fifth listening session in Manchester Wednesday night.

 

About a hundred people participated in the forum, which has the goal of gathering feedback on how the state can become more welcoming for people of all backgrounds.

 

Sitting around folding tables at Brookside Congregational Church, attendees spoke of their personal experiences.

 

Cosme Neles said he's concerned about how immigrants see the Granite State.

Savannah Maher/NHPR

Students in Parkland, Florida started school today six months after a shooter killed 14 of their classmates and 3 adult teachers and coaches. A group of  teenagers from around New Hampshire spent the day rallying for gun control measures in their own state. 

The 25 students, who held a press conference followed by a march around the State House this morning, are part of what they call the "lockdown generation" -- kids who have grown up preparing for the possibility of a mass school shooting. 

A new report from the New Hampshire Women's Foundation finds slightly more women are seeking office in the state compared to two years ago. But there are significant differences in the number of women running based on political party and region.

Sara Plourde/NHPR

Item No. 4 on the agenda seemed routine, even dull: a vote on “Cash Control and Security 2-11 Large Volume Sales Policy Revision.”

But within months, that one policy tweak would bring major changes -- and lots of cash -- to one of New Hampshire's most important money makers: state-run liquor stores.

Britta Greene / NHPR

 

Almost a year after an 8-year-old biracial boy was nearly hanged, the New Hampshire attorney general's office says a legal dispute is preventing it from releasing a report on its investigation.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

Governor Chris Sununu and state Health Commissioner Jeff Meyers on Wednesday announced a major overhaul of New Hampshire's addiction treatment infrastructure.

The state will funnel tens of millions in newly available federal funds into a coordinated system of care that tracks patients for months, if not years, through their recovery. The funds, expected to total roughly $46 million over a two-year period, were made available through the federal budget deal earlier this year.

AP

Michael Avenatti, the lawyer for "Stormy Daniels," will appear at a Democratic Party picnic this weekend in New Hampshire.

Michael Avenatti says he's considering a 2020 presidential run. He already visited Iowa and on Sunday he'll speak at the Hillsborough County Democrats Summer Picnic in Greenfield.

Roger Lessard leads the local Democratic committee there.  He says the Avenatti visit came together quickly.

"We had not anticipated having anyone of national note appearing at the picnic and this just sort of fell into our lap."

James Sarmiento / Flickr

More than 120 people attended a forum on education funding in Newport on Tuesday night.

This is the second forum on education funding this year that Executive Councilor Andru Volinsky and attorney John Tobin have put on. Both were lawyers in the original cases that sued the state for adequate funding.

During their presentation, which drew attendees from nearly two dozen towns, they broke down differences in property taxes across the state and the percentages towns pay for education versus the state.

Animal Planet

 

Scene-stealing snakes, bears, turkeys and lobsters all make an appearance in the latest season of a television program featuring New Hampshire's Fish and Game conservation officers.

"North Woods Law: New Hampshire" returns to the Animal Planet cable network on Sunday at 9 p.m.

Episodes feature officers dealing with a woman who has been hand-feeding bears in her backyard, an illegal turkey hunt, and a man finding a snake in his bed.

 

NHPR Staff

An independent organization of Dartmouth College faculty says the school should offer reparations to victims of harassment and abuse, and should investigate how a "hostile climate" was allowed to persist in the psychology department for years. 

Annie Ropeik for NHPR

As Molly Kelly makes her case to voters that she should be New Hampshire’s next governor, a recurrent argument is that her time in the state Senate proves that she is up to the task of leading New Hampshire.

“As governor, I think it is very important that you have that experience to work with legislators, and that you are ready day one," she recently said on the trail.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

New data is shedding light on the possible source of PFAS chemical contamination at the Coakley Landfill Superfund site on the Seacoast.

The data comes from a contractor for the Coakley Landfill Group, the towns and businesses responsible for pollution at the landfill.

They voluntarily analyzed water from Berry's Brook, which runs out from the landfill and was found last year to contain high levels of PFAS chemicals.

Those are man-made substances that are slow to biodegrade and have been linked to cancer and other diseases.

The federal defense spending authorization bill President Trump signed Monday includes added funding for a national health study on PFAS chemicals – and neighbors of Pease International Tradeport will be the first group studied.

The study will analyze health effects for children and adults exposed to PFAS in the Tradeport's drinking water years ago.

The man-made chemicals have been linked to cancer and other diseases, and were left at Pease by past military operations.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

A federal judge has struck down a New hampshire law that allows pollworkers to toss out absentee ballots if they don’t believe the signature adequately matches the one used on other voting paperwork.

  Governor Sununu's Advisory Council on Diversity and Inclusion will hold its fifth listening session in Manchester on Wednesday evening.

 

The public forums are organized to collect stories and concerns from the community so they can inform future policy and increase equity in the state.

 

For the latest in our Only in New Hampshire series, we’re taking on a question from listener Meg Miles. She asks: Why is New Hampshire the only state in the region without a bottle deposit

PSN

 

Measures helping the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard are included in the defense policy bill that President Donald Trump signed into law.

Democratic New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen says the law repeals a policy that targeted shipyard workers.

It had reduced the per diem rate for civilian workers for each day while they were away from their families to provide maintenance to ships and submarines.

The law also addresses shallow water levels at the shipyard and the impediment to the docking and undocking of submarines by creating a flood basin.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire schools will begin classes again in just a few weeks, and as they get ready for the year ahead, officials continue to discuss safety and security concerns.

Several schools have made infrastructure upgrades over the summer, and Gov. Chris Sununu’s Safety and Preparedness Task Force released a report in June with their recommendations.

Perry Plummer is the chairman of that task force. He’s also the director of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. He spoke with Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley about school security efforts in the upcoming year.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

The Coakley Landfill on New Hampshire’s Seacoast is back in the headlines, more than 30 years after it became a Superfund site.

Neighbors are again worried the site could be poisoning their drinking water, after a rash of childhood cancer cases nearby and the discovery of dangerously high levels of PFAS chemicals at the landfill.

That’s despite local officials' promises that the landfill is safe, under control and not a threat to nearby residents. In fact, they say the landfill is mostly just misunderstood.

Invitation via Josh Zakim's Facebook Page

 It's not out of the ordinary to see a New Hampshire politician skip across the state's southern border to raise money in Boston. What is unusual — really, unheard of until this year — is to see that from someone running for Secretary of State.

Wikimedia Commons

A group of neighbors concerned about noise are asking the state Supreme Court to step in and block a proposed country music festival at the New Hampshire Motor Speedway.

In May, a Superior Court judge ruled that the racetrack can go ahead with a multi-day concert despite an agreement signed in 1989 that prohibits stand-alone concerts at the track.

File

Governors from every New England state but Maine are weighing in on lowering energy rates.

Their joint statement comes as they meet on energy and other issues with leaders from Eastern Canada.

The five governors say they'll work to encourage energy efficiency this coming winter. They say more hydro, wind and natural gas capacity will help lower rates and boost reliability too.

josh rogers / nhpr

Company officials were joined at the groundbreaking by U.S. Senators Jeanne Shaheen and Maggie Hassan. Before they all donned hard hats and turned the soil with chromed shovels, Revision CEO Jonathan Blanshay said New Hampshire's workforce, proximity to Boston, and political climate, made it the perfect location for its U.S. Headquarters.

"In just over a year we will have a brand new, state of the art facility. It is going to house the most advanced soldier systems capability in the world, right here in New Hampshire."

NHPR Photo

The father of a toddler who was killed by the child’s mother is suing the N.H. Division of Children, Youth and Families for negligence.

In a suit filed on Monday in Superior Court, Christopher Willott alleges the state failed protect his daughter from “foreseeable risks of harm.” Twenty-one-month-old Sadee Willott was killed in September, 2015, after sustaining injuries in the bathtub. The child’s mother Kaitlin Paquette is serving a 21-42 year prison sentence after pleading guilty in 2017.

Dan Tuohy for NHPR

Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Steve Marchand talks about the issues in his campaign, from energy to education, and answers your questions. 

Note: Marchand's primary opponent, former state senator Molly Kelly, declined to appear on today's program.

Later in the hour, NHPR's Josh Rogers updates us on the New Hampshire Governor's race overall. 

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